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CAA CAP 1789

The EU UAS Regulation Package - Outline

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Steve J21/06/2019 13:41:31
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The CAA have published an outline of the EU UAS regulations.

Steve

Trevor21/06/2019 14:16:08
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This clause gave me some hope:

“Model aircraft
Additional provisions are made within the regulation to cater for operations, including registration and remote pilot competence, under the framework of model aircraft clubs or associations under a separate authorisation that can be negotiated with, and issued by, the CAA.”

That seems to keep the door ajar for a pragmatic solution. I just hope the will is there to achieve it.

Trevor

Edited By Trevor on 21/06/2019 14:16:40

Steve J21/06/2019 16:44:44
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Two things that I take from this document:

1) the CAA are referring to the test that we have to do from November as a 'foundation';

2) the minimum age for open category remote pilots will be 12 (which is the lowest that the regulation allows the CAA to make it).

Steve

Edited By Steve J on 21/06/2019 16:45:35

Simon Chaddock21/06/2019 17:32:36
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Interesting that the maximum weight allowed before registration is required in France is 800 g rather than 250 g proposed in the UK.

The French seem to have a different definition of low/no risk!

Martin Harris24/06/2019 22:17:20
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From Article 4:

...the fact that the unmanned aircraft cannot

•drop any material (i.e. articles) whatsoever (this is a security requirement)

How does the panel interpret the apparent total ban on dropping anything?

Is this the end for toffee bombing, scale model bomb releasing, parachute dropping (what about glider launch lines/bungees?) or even releasing ashes of deceased club members over their favourite club fields?

I didn't see any reference to exemptions although my reading was fairly cursory.

Steve J24/06/2019 22:57:01
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Article 4 is open category.

Posted by Martin Harris on 24/06/2019 22:17:20:

Is this the end for toffee bombing, scale model bomb releasing, parachute dropping ...

We need all that stuff to be in the authorisation that the CAA gives to the UK model associations.

Steve

kevin b24/06/2019 23:00:10
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Posted by Trevor on 21/06/2019 14:16:08:

That seems to keep the door ajar for a pragmatic solution. I just hope the will is there to achieve it.

Trevor

Edited By Trevor on 21/06/2019 14:16:40

It will be there. The government don't want to pay for it and they know that if they price us "out of the market", they will have to, because they are committed to addressing the problem. If we go away the problem won't.

Chris Berry25/06/2019 07:02:49
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The dates make me chuckle

Gordon Whitehead 125/06/2019 10:00:57
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A friend texted me the other day with the proud announcement that while flying his thermal soarers at a recent aerotow event, he'd set a new personal best height in a thermal at 1925 feet.

PART A. UAS.OPEN.10 places height limits on sailplanes.

I don't fly sailplanes myself, and can see no possibility of a height exemption for the powered stuff I do fly. But I'm wondering how the thermalists amongst us will cope with UAS.OPEN.10.

All these new rules bring to mind how free and easy life used to be. As teenagers in the 1960's, a friend and I were flying our 10oz wt or so Vic Smeed Cherubs from a field near Keighley. Somehow my mate misjudged the size of the squirt of diesel fuel he put in the tank of his Mills .75 and it puttered away from the field towards the town at a goodly height, eventually gliding down onto the roof of an abandoned cotton mill. The holes in the mill's rotting upper floors and roof were something of a deterrent but with the full confidence of youth we retrieved the plane undamaged. We'd broken all the rules laid out in this CAP (and probably some law of trespass too).

Steve J25/06/2019 10:39:45
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UAS.OPEN.010 contains a significant concession to allow slope soaring the open category that was granted after a campaign organised by finesseplus and others late last year.

Flying over 400ft under both current UK law and the EU regulation requires permission from the CAA.

Steve

Andrew Ray25/06/2019 11:07:49
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This seems to suggest that flying models weighing up to 7kg over 400' is approved providing certain conditions are met in paragraph 3 and is dated 4th April 2019.

As CAP 1789 is an outline as I read it, it does not contain the detail.

To my mind for the club flyer, wether power or silent flight not much will change for practical purposes and any registration, test or modest fee is nothing more than an irritation

Gordon Whitehead 125/06/2019 12:03:42
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The "Flying Models in France " link on the finesseplus site looks useful if one plans to fly over there. Has anyone had a go at the online test?

The short videos are a neat summary of the regulations. The fines for transgression are huge even if the rule-breaking is inadvertent.

I wonder if we'll see similar guidance over here.

Gordon

Martin Harris25/06/2019 12:08:18
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Posted by Andrew Ray on 25/06/2019 11:07:49:

This seems to suggest that flying models weighing up to 7kg over 400' is approved providing certain conditions are met in paragraph 3 and is dated 4th April 2019.

As CAP 1789 is an outline as I read it, it does not contain the detail.

I don't think that Steve's statement is incorrect. The permission he mentioned is exactly what has been granted to the 4 associations and applies only to their members. The 400' rule stands for all other model flyers.

This exemption can be withdrawn or modified at any time as I understand it. It would not be mentioned in CAP 1789 as the regulations stand at 400'.

Edited By Martin Harris on 25/06/2019 12:14:45

Andrew Ray25/06/2019 12:32:09
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Thanks Martin, I see now the document I have linked to is the permission.

Dickw25/06/2019 12:33:29
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Posted by Gordon Whitehead 1 on 25/06/2019 12:03:42:

The "Flying Models in France " link on the finesseplus site looks useful if one plans to fly over there. Has anyone had a go at the online test?

The short videos are a neat summary of the regulations. The fines for transgression are huge even if the rule-breaking is inadvertent.

I wonder if we'll see similar guidance over here.

Gordon

Yes, I had a go at the test and passed. I have also registered a couple of planes on the French system.

No plans to fly there, I just did it out of curiosity. Once you have worked through the videos the test is then failrly simple.

Dick

Don Fry25/06/2019 13:18:54
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Small bit of French examination advise. It's multiple choice, but some of the questions have more than one correct answer. Tick all correct answers.

Steve J25/06/2019 13:50:12
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Posted by Martin Harris on 25/06/2019 12:08:18:

This exemption can be withdrawn or modified at any time as I understand it.

That is why I was happy to see the slope clause and a couple of other things in the regulation. I can do most of my flying in the open category, it's only big aeros and thermal soaring that I will need the associations article 16 authorisation for.

Steve

Gordon Whitehead 125/06/2019 17:14:17
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Posted by Dickw on 25/06/2019 12:33:29:

Yes, I had a go at the test and passed. I have also registered a couple of planes on the French system.

No plans to fly there, I just did it out of curiosity. Once you have worked through the videos the test is then fairly simple.

Dick

As a matter of interest Dick, was there a place to de-register your models - just in case a posse of gendarmes fancied a day out across the channel to check your docs wink 2

Gordon

Dickw25/06/2019 17:38:39
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Gordon

Just checked and I can't see any way of de-registering anything, or cancelling my French competency cert.

Can't see why it would be a problem anyway. If a gendarme wants to check my French docs while I am flying in the UK under our airspace regs he is welcome to do so.

Incidently, my French registrations and competency are free and valid until 2024!

The whole French process is possible in English here.

Dick

Steve J25/06/2019 17:46:34
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Posted by Dickw on 25/06/2019 17:38:39:

Just checked and I can't see any way of de-registering anything, or cancelling my French competency cert.

Can't see why it would be a problem anyway. If a gendarme wants to check my French docs while I am flying in the UK under our airspace regs he is welcome to do so.

The regulation says:

"UAS operators shall register themselves in the Member State where they have their residence for natural persons or where they have their principal place of business for legal persons and ensure that their registration information is accurate. A UAS operator cannot be registered in more than one Member State at a time."

I wonder if the French will remove non-residents from their database before 1st July next year.

Steve

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