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Wots Wot Deluxe Kit

First time kit build

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Jonathan Quayle12/07/2019 08:58:05
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5 forum posts

Hello, long time lurker here,

I'm hoping some more experienced members can help me out here. I've been flying for a few years now (self taught, which was expensive...) mostly with a few foamies an second hand ARTFs.

I had a bit of a false start when I was 13 back in '99 when I built a club trainer ARTF with an MDS 40 pro (hobbystores bundle) but never actually flew it.

Anyway, I digress.

I feel I need to earn my stripes and build from a kit, preferably a domestic one.

I did have an ARTF Wots Wot a couple of years ago which was electric and flew brilliantly, however a LiPo fire in flight ended that spectacularly. I'd love another one and I've been looking at the "Deluxe Kits" for sale and I'm almost ready to take the plunge.

so my questions are:

1) has anyone here built one in the past

2) is this suitable for a first time kit builder (i'm a fairly competent mechanic and carpenter, and have repaired a few built up ARTFS)

3) what should I consider power plant wise? I definitely want to go glow.

4) any gotchas I've missed?

all comments welcome!

Jon

Pete B - Moderator12/07/2019 22:03:57
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Moderator
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Hi Jonathan, Welcome to the forum - you're not the first long time lurker to eventually succumb....wink 2

I'm aware you've waited some time to get this post approved so I'll bump it up the list to get some coveragethumbs up

Pete

Geoff Sleath13/07/2019 01:12:56
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3371 forum posts
272 photos

I've never built a Wots Wot but I started by building my trainer which was the first model I'd built since the early 1950s when I was still at school. My background then was from quite practical hobbies like restoring vintage motor cycles, decking sailing dinghies and building bicycles so I can't think you'd have many problems.

Just make sure it's all straight and strong and make sure you have a flat building board.

As for power, I wouldn't know. If electric I'd go for 4 or 5S LiPo and aim for at least 100 watts/lb for lively aerobatics though it would fly on 70 or 80 watts/lb. Just fit the kit recommended glow engine size if that's what you prefer.

I'd say go for it.

Geoff

edgar13/07/2019 05:09:56
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68 forum posts
25 photos

I've never built a Wots Wot either, but my first kit since I was 15 was a Wot 4 (a forty year gap), this was after building two ARTF trainers. The finished item was not perfect but it flew well enough and no one else noticed the imperfections. Based on my experience, I would say that it probably is suitable for a first time kit builder, especially a competent mechanic and carpenter (I do not consider myself to be either of these) who has repaired a few built up ARTFS. In terms of the power source Geoff has given some sound advice, it might be helpful to have the details of this clear at the start, because it will probably determine the position of the firewall very early in the build. If you search for Wots Wot on this forum there are one or two useful building tips which might help.

Percy Verance13/07/2019 06:40:41
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

I had a Wots Wot kit about 20 years back, but sold it on before I built it to fund another project. I have built a couple of other Foss kits though - Mini Phase and an Acrowot - and rate them quite highly. They are among the most straightforward of any kits on the market to build. There is no full size plan, but instead you get a leaflet with plenty of info plus some good constructional sketches/drawings. Follow those and you're unlikely to go wrong.

If you've repaired a few artf's Jonathan, you're not going to have any problems. I'd echo what's been said already. The basis for any sound/straight accurately built model build is a flat ( and warp free!) board of adequate size to build on. The favourite material to use on the board into which you can push pins, seems to be plasterboard these days.

If you prefer to go with a glow engine, I'd consider a four stroke. They produce a little more torque than a two stroke, and to many people's ears produce a more acceptable noise. The choice these days isn't what it was 5 or 10 years ago. A few engine manufacturers have ceased production, and some others seem to have scaled back production and pared their range of engines. If I wanted a four stroke glow engine today, my first port of call would be Laser Engines. These are UK produced engines, and are of superb quality. They're usually built to order and are not often held as stock items because they usually sell as soon as they're in stock! Take a look at www.laserengines.com and see if there's anything you fancy Jonathan.... the .80 would fly the Wots Wot well enough, but for a more lively, fully aerobatic performance, some might say go for the .100 or the 1.20

 

Edited By Percy Verance on 13/07/2019 06:43:57

Chris Walby13/07/2019 06:53:40
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984 forum posts
231 photos

IMHO if getting into the building I would go for the Acrowot deluxe form Leeds model shop (4 left!)(other suppliers may have them!). Its less wings to build, less faff assembly at the field and more forgiving flight envelope than the Wotswot.

My ARTF Acrowot with a Laser 70 is an absolute cracker to fly in most weather conditions where the electric Wotswot (ARTF) is harder work (just when you don't need it - landing!).

The built up may come out a bit heavier so a Laser 80 might be better so worth posting a question on the Laser tread or give Jon at Laser Engines a call and he'll help out.

PS the Laser sounds nice and are known for their reliability which can be reassuring for the newer person to hobby.

Percy Verance13/07/2019 07:08:16
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

I'd be inclined to agree with Chris here. The additional complication and work of an extra wing for a first complete build may not be a sound way to go. The easier, more straightforward the better I'd say. As Chris says, the Acrowot would be good. Quicker to build ( no second wing), and will fly just as well. Acrowot + Laser .80 would be a winning combination. yes

John Lee13/07/2019 11:10:21
653 forum posts
48 photos

I built one back in the 90's. It's a very straightforward build so if that's your preference I say go for it.

I finished mine it in glass cloth & epoxy & it came out a bit heavy. It was powered initially with an Irvine 72 & when that wore out I put in a J'en 90, both 2-strokes. Both were over the top power wise but we had a tendency then to see how big an engine we could stuff in the various Wots. It was as tough as old boots & I eventually sold it after about 10 years hard use only to see it on Ebay a few years later still going strong.

So to answer your questions Jonathan:

1) Yes, as have hundreds if not thousands done so over the years.

2) Yes, should be no problem given your description of your abilities.

3) Follow Chris's guidelines - .45 - 60, 2 stroke or 60-90 4 stroke. If I was to build another I'd keep it lighter than previous and use an OS 55 AX.

4) No gotchas but do use the optional GRP undercarriage & cowl.

Jonathan Quayle13/07/2019 13:23:47
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5 forum posts

Thank you so much for all the replies!

I think from what I’ve read here and elsewhere it should be okay for a build complexity perspective. For a power plant I think this needs to be domestic too. The laser 80 seems like a good shout, never had one before. It played with a few ASP 4 strokes and a Saito radial so should be interesting!

orders being placed soon (if I can get hold of an engine) and build log to follow!

Jonathan Quayle13/07/2019 13:25:09
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5 forum posts
Posted by John Lee on 13/07/2019 11:10:21:

I built one back in the 90's. It's a very straightforward build so if that's your preference I say go for it.

I finished mine it in glass cloth & epoxy & it came out a bit heavy. It was powered initially with an Irvine 72 & when that wore out I put in a J'en 90, both 2-strokes. Both were over the top power wise but we had a tendency then to see how big an engine we could stuff in the various Wots. It was as tough as old boots & I eventually sold it after about 10 years hard use only to see it on Ebay a few years later still going strong.

So to answer your questions Jonathan:

1) Yes, as have hundreds if not thousands done so over the years.

2) Yes, should be no problem given your description of your abilities.

3) Follow Chris's guidelines - .45 - 60, 2 stroke or 60-90 4 stroke. If I was to build another I'd keep it lighter than previous and use an OS 55 AX.

4) No gotchas but do use the optional GRP undercarriage & cowl.

John, thanks for this. Was durability or main reason for the glass finish? I fly of an a pretty poor surface so this would help.

Frank Skilbeck13/07/2019 15:59:07
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4453 forum posts
101 photos

My ARTF Wots Wot has a TT 75FS up front, which is more than adequate, so a Laser 80 would be more than adequate IMHO.

John Lee13/07/2019 17:01:06
653 forum posts
48 photos
Posted by Jonathan Quayle on 13/07/2019 13:25:09:
John, thanks for this. Was durability or main reason for the glass finish? I fly of an a pretty poor surface so this would help.

Jonathan, yes durability was the reason, but not so much from the flying surface.

When flying IC & using conventional fuel proofers my models eventually suffered from the absorption of fuel & exhaust residues over the years which led to them becoming increasingly tatty & being pensioned off. The only thing that worked for me was to coat the inside with epoxy resin during the build & finish the outside with glass, epoxy & spray paint.

I now fly exclusively electric but the last IC model I still have is a Wot4 built about 1984 & finished in this way. It has had hundreds of flights & last flew a few years ago, but it is still completely sound & I could take it out tomorrow & fly it (it's on its third OS40 FSR but still has the original Futaba 128/148 servos).

Percy Verance13/07/2019 20:01:32
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8108 forum posts
155 photos

Wow, Futaba 128's. My Fut Gold came with 128's in about 1983.......

CARPERFECT13/07/2019 20:31:45
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483 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Johnathan, This is what you want to build ?. They are very easy to build, I built this years ago, They may have changed a few bits over the years, mine has foam wings, sheeted. It has an ASP fs 70 up front.. Where abouts in the country are you ? Its having a day out at Pontefract this Sunday 14/7/19

Wots Wot

Edited By CARPERFECT on 13/07/2019 20:32:33

Edited By CARPERFECT on 13/07/2019 20:34:13

Jonathan Quayle15/07/2019 12:58:39
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5 forum posts
Posted by John Lee on 13/07/2019 17:01:06:

When flying IC & using conventional fuel proofers my models eventually suffered from the absorption of fuel & exhaust residues over the years which led to them becoming increasingly tatty & being pensioned off. The only thing that worked for me was to coat the inside with epoxy resin during the build & finish the outside with glass, epoxy & spray paint.

That's a great bit of info John, I'll try this on my build. any reccomendations on which fiber/epoxy kit to use?

CARPERFECT - I'm in Oxfordshire but thanks anyway. that's a nice bird you have there!

John Lee15/07/2019 16:49:13
653 forum posts
48 photos

Jonathan I used to use SP113 resin & 24g/sq metre cloth. It's probably over a decade since I last bought any though (not needed now I fly electric) and I can't recall seeing SP113 of late.

I've used Bucks Composites at major model shows for Carbon rods, they have a full range of products & I would go to them if I needed materials in the future. You may want to have a look at them, with the caveat that I've no experience of their resins. Perhaps someone else here can give an endorsement?

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