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Moon landing

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Cuban820/07/2019 12:51:38
2561 forum posts
12 photos

I was 12 in '69, so recall the moon walk quite well, although I missed it live at 3.00 am . James Burke could sometimes 'over popularise' things I agree, and for my money, ITV's Peter Fairley was the better choice IIRC. I recall being frustrated at the lack of in-depth coverage, despite the unprecedented time that TV gave to Apollo 11 and the others, if you missed the TV programme, then that was that. Domestic video recorders wern't around yet. Newspapers just didn't have the immediacy of TV. How things are different now with NASA TV and live feeds from the ISS and the commercial operators and the web awash with detail.

Cuban820/07/2019 13:00:34
2561 forum posts
12 photos
Posted by Wilco Wingco on 20/07/2019 12:37:05:

It was not an anti American rant but an attempt to tell the truth about this fantastic American ? project. All those people who died in order to make this happen should be remembered for the parts they played.

I think people do understand the darker side of the space race, whether it's the terrible conditions of slave labourers working on the V2, or the counter arguments regarding the cost of the US space programme when they had such poverty at home. The same could be argued against the Vietnam War, I suppose. On that subject, I looked up US casualty records in Vietnam on the day of the moon landing and learned that 30 troops were killed.. Not much to celebrate every year and anniversary for the families affected.

Doc Marten20/07/2019 13:13:01
352 forum posts
4 photos
Posted by Wilco Wingco on 20/07/2019 12:37:05:

It was not an anti American rant but an attempt to tell the truth about this fantastic American ? project. All those people who died in order to make this happen should be remembered for the parts they played.

 

The concluding "well done America" and the question mark inserted into your latest "...fantastic American" comment confirm your anti American feeling.

What other achievements do you feel you need to berate due to the suffering of others? We all know the dark side of medical, scientific and technological achievements but do you need to bring it up in a moon landing thread on a model flying forum? Next time a member posts a topic mentioning that their circuit breaker has tripped will you pile in with how many experiments were carried out on human and other living beings to provide the data which now keeps us safer?

Don't pass your own guilt onto us, we know the history and live with it, taking the benefits we now have from the uncomfortable and grotesque past.

 

Edited By Doc Marten on 20/07/2019 13:17:08

barryt20/07/2019 13:21:25
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50 forum posts
14 photos

I was 17 and managed to stay awake all night while staring at the largely inanimate black, white and shadowy tv pictures. Luckily, for me anyway, the advent of the internet and more recently Youtube channels, has shed light on some of the fascinating and innovative engineering that made the project so successful.

I have just reread James Hansen's book First Man, It reveals that as a schoolboy Neil Armstrong was an Aeromodeller, building enough balsa and tissue models to fill his bedroom.

He was issued a student pilots licence on his sixteenth birthday and soloed two weeks later. A special man indeed.

Colin Leighfield20/07/2019 14:15:02
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5886 forum posts
2457 photos

It sounds as if we should stop buying German cars because BMW etc were major users/abusers of slave labour, also coffee from Brazil which was probably the largest slave owning nation. We would probably find a reason to condemn everything if we pursue this line, so best stick to the subject and celebrate human achievement that commemorates all of those that contributed to it. The moon landing was perhaps the greatest technical achievement of all time and I really hope that we are now seeing the beginning of the next episode in our journey into space. There’s nothing more exciting. I will never forget following the adventure of Apollo 11 from start of finish, the experience of a lifetime.

David P Williams20/07/2019 14:24:25
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834 forum posts
282 photos

I was up at 3am watching it live (I was 18) and I seem to remember that the picture of the ladder waiting for Neil Armstrong to descend was initially upside down, and I couldn't work out what I was looking at. Is that my memory, or was it our flaky telly, or was that how it happened?

Clever of the conspirators to build that element in just to make it seem more realistic !

Josip Vrandecic -Mes20/07/2019 14:31:57
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2982 forum posts
259 photos
Perhaps someone will be interested in this document prepared for President Nixon and in the event of a failure of the mission to the Moon.
''Moon 50
J D 820/07/2019 15:11:30
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1193 forum posts
74 photos

One of the great things about the Apollo missions starting with Apollo 7 was that we at home could go with them through the TV, Going to explore somewhere completely new. Something that could not happen in the time of Columbus, Cook or Shackleton when it took weeks, months even years for news to reach home.

By the later Apollo 15/16/17 missions the TV pictures and sound transmitted had improved a lot.

Christmas 1968 will always be a special memory for me as for the first time man had left the earth behind to go to another world.

Apollo 8 crew Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders transmitted their Christmas message while in moon orbit with a moving reading from the book of Genesis.

Many today think the famous "earthrise" photo was taken by Neil or Buzz but it was taken by Bill Anders on Dec 24th 1968.

Today many have been to space but only the 24 Apollo moon men have ever left low earth orbit. [ three went twice ]

John Bisset20/07/2019 16:30:18
130 forum posts
Posted by David P Williams on 20/07/2019 14:24:25:

I was up at 3am watching it live (I was 18) and I seem to remember that the picture of the ladder waiting for Neil Armstrong to descend was initially upside down, and I couldn't work out what I was looking at. Is that my memory, or was it our flaky telly, or was that how it happened?

Clever of the conspirators to build that element in just to make it seem more realistic !

Yes, that is right, the picture was at first upside down as transmitted, for some reason , possibly to do with the re-transmission from the Australian NASA pick up, if my memory is correct. Mission Control swapped it around after a few minutes. I had the same problem as you - couldn't work out what I was seeing.

Truly magnificent achievement. Interesting that several of the astronauts later admitted how low they had rated their chances of survival, let alone success. Impressive in so many ways.

Plummet20/07/2019 16:38:32
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1389 forum posts
41 photos

devil

Of course the whole thing would have been a lot harder if trees grew on the moon.

Plummet

Geoff Sleath20/07/2019 17:16:42
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3267 forum posts
251 photos
Posted by David P Williams on 20/07/2019 14:24:25:

I was up at 3am watching it live (I was 18) and I seem to remember that the picture of the ladder waiting for Neil Armstrong to descend was initially upside down, and I couldn't work out what I was looking at. Is that my memory, or was it our flaky telly, or was that how it happened?

Clever of the conspirators to build that element in just to make it seem more realistic !

I was 29 at the time but I'd forgotten that the initial pictures were inverted. I was probably too tired to notice

Geoff

Martin McIntosh20/07/2019 19:09:59
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2870 forum posts
1058 photos

Some of you will no doubt remember that I put a thread on here a while ago regarding a theory that this was all done in Hollywood. Many hundreds of generally nasty replies from people calling me a lunatic etc.

I have watched most of the recent stuff on TV and was slowly coming round to believing that it actually happened until I saw one of the `take offs` again. A few sparks, no dust, no flame from the rocket and the camera tilted up with the craft, and please don`t tell me again that it was controlled from the Earth. Why did it stop when it did and not follow the craft up further?

Also, on the `landings`, we can hear every word said by the crew with a rocket motor inches below them.

NASA have recently admitted that a Mars mission would not be possible until they found a way to get through Earth`s radiation belt without frying the crew.

I rest my case.

Martin Harris20/07/2019 19:33:47
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8662 forum posts
214 photos

I wonder if this might help restore your faith in NASA by answering some of your questions?

Having been captivated by the Apollo programme as an impressionable young boy, I'd be devastated to find out that it was faked and I can't understand why the USSR wouldn't have pushed hard to expose it should that have been the case.

Noise-wise, with no atmosphere, wouldn't the only sound coming from the rocket motor be vibration transmitted by the framework? It wouldn't be inconceivable that there were some sort of resilient mountings and I would think it entirely possible that throat microphones could have been in use - anyone know?

Malcolm Fisher20/07/2019 19:59:24
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611 forum posts
7 photos

This week the moon landing has been serialised on Radio Four based on recordings of the transmissions between Houston and Apollo. For my wife and me it was more moving than what we remember of the actual event. Then we only heard what was broadcast on radio as we didn't have a TV. We still live in that state and don't miss having a TV set of any sort - no time to watch - it's easier to get on with things while listening rather than watching.

Malcolm

Mike Blandford20/07/2019 20:02:26
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512 forum posts
22 photos

Why do you expect to see a "flame" from the rocket motor? Unlike the Saturn V first stage that uses kerosene, the lunar module uses hydrogen and oxygen, flames are mainly caused by glowing carbon.

For the landing, remember the rocket motor was not that powerful, it was only working against 1/6th of earth gravity. It is also mounted on the descent stage, so is a bit further away from the astronauts than you might think.

It appears that: "Apollo flight trajectories bypassed the inner belts completely, passing through the thinner areas of the outer belts"

Mike

Martin Harris20/07/2019 20:10:59
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8662 forum posts
214 photos

The duration of the transit was also very short, limiting the radiation exposure. The supposed admission that there were problems getting the Mars mission through the Van Allen belts referred to the effects on modern microelectronics and the longer term effects during the mission.

Dr Van Allen himself calculated the dosage during transit of "his" belts as very much in the safe range for humans.

Geoff Sleath20/07/2019 20:27:05
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3267 forum posts
251 photos
Posted by Martin McIntosh on 20/07/2019 19:09:59:

Some of you will no doubt remember that I put a thread on here a while ago regarding a theory that this was all done in Hollywood. Many hundreds of generally nasty replies from people calling me a lunatic etc.

I have watched most of the recent stuff on TV and was slowly coming round to believing that it actually happened until I saw one of the `take offs` again. A few sparks, no dust, no flame from the rocket and the camera tilted up with the craft, and please don`t tell me again that it was controlled from the Earth. Why did it stop when it did and not follow the craft up further?

Also, on the `landings`, we can hear every word said by the crew with a rocket motor inches below them.

NASA have recently admitted that a Mars mission would not be possible until they found a way to get through Earth`s radiation belt without frying the crew.

I rest my case.

Quite apart from any technical matters there's the problem that many 100s (if not 1000s) of people would have needed to be aware of any conspiracy. It would be amazing if not even one of them had thought to betray the fantasy in 50 years. Moreover secrets only remain truly secret the fewer people are involved ... ideally one.

I suspect, Martin, you're a troll in the original sense ie making outrageous assertions and then sitting back to watch the sparks fly

Geoff

brokenenglish20/07/2019 21:11:32
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446 forum posts
32 photos

While agreeing entirely with Geoff's post, there's another point that always amuses me.

The "doubters" (for want of a better word that would be accepted by the mods) are always only considering a few things that they don't understand from the actual moon sequence...

BUT, what about the preparation, the actual launch, and the flight out and back and the arrival back on earth, which we all followed.
How do our intellectuals think all that was done?
Where did the crew and the vessel just fly around for a week or more, between the launch and the splashdown?

Gary Manuel20/07/2019 21:20:45
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1853 forum posts
1507 photos
Posted by brokenenglish on 20/07/2019 21:11:32:

While agreeing entirely with Geoff's post, there's another point that always amuses me.

The "doubters" (for want of a better word that would be accepted by the mods) are always only considering a few things that they don't understand from the actual moon sequence...

BUT, what about the preparation, the actual launch, and the flight out and back and the arrival back on earth, which we all followed.
How do our intellectuals think all that was done?
Where did the crew and the vessel just fly around for a week or more, between the launch and the splashdown?

... and the fact that the Americans fierce competitor - the Russians (plus us at Jodrell Bank) were tracking their every move. I think they may have had something to say if there was any foul play.

Steve Colman20/07/2019 21:27:59
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719 forum posts
417 photos

I've just watched the film "The First Man" on the tele and thoroughly enjoyed it.

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