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New Poll - sticky situations.....

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Q: How often - when using superglue - do you end up with it on your fingers?

 Every time
 Occasionally
 Sometimes
 Rarely
 Never
 Wear rubber gloves


Bob Cotsford26/08/2019 20:44:09
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8058 forum posts
444 photos

I didn't need to make it that complicated the other day. Two fingers holding a piece of wood in place, 'I'll just put a drop of CA on there to tack it'. Glue floods out, index and middle fingers bonded to each other and to the Black Magic I'm fettling. I knew there was a reason that I usually stick to PVA.

Coat please blush

Don Fry26/08/2019 21:15:46
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4116 forum posts
48 photos

That Bob, is called microdermabrasion treatment. When you peel yer fingers off, be grateful the airframe doesn't charge you 50 quid.

Richard Harris26/08/2019 21:18:58
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2063 forum posts
1895 photos

Everytime time for me along with blood on pretty much every model I have built.

Edited By Richard Harris on 26/08/2019 21:19:37

Bob Cotsford26/08/2019 21:20:10
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8058 forum posts
444 photos

More than the BM cost me! Don't arf get some funny looks paying at the supermarket checkout with rather knobbly and woody growths on your fingers laugh

Stuart Z26/08/2019 21:50:11
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382 forum posts
Posted by Peter Miller on 26/08/2019 14:16:27:

I can get it on my fingers just opening the bottle.

THis why I keep acetone on the workshop

Guaranteed certainty ! As Peter, I keep Acetone on the workbench.

S

Martin Harris26/08/2019 22:11:24
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8944 forum posts
221 photos

Even I'm not using a fingertip to start off the setting process, I'm quite adept at puling my digits off a model's structure when the CA runs off unexpectedly.

The most entertaining "accident" was when I'd been doing some modelling indoors and picked up a large handful of tools to take them back out to my workshop. Amongst the odds and end was a bottle of thin cyano and the inevitable happened...things started getting hot and I ended up like a budget version of Edward Scissorhands. 10 minutes of soaking in warm soapy water later, the tools were separated from my fingers and the finger picking could commence.

Geoff Sleath26/08/2019 23:28:16
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3481 forum posts
318 photos

Well I voted for 'always' but that's not strictly true - it's only 99%.

Geoff

ASH.26/08/2019 23:56:40
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310 forum posts

i hate the stuff, but have to use it for mylar hinges.

I always keep debonder close by, just in case.

iqon26/08/2019 23:56:52
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1468 forum posts
239 photos

Not saying......blush

Kevin 21627/08/2019 06:45:02
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214 forum posts

Using the thin cyno = attached to Bench/model/tools/etc.

Reminds me of the old Stealers Wheel song "Stuck in the middle with you glue"

Nigel R27/08/2019 09:03:38
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3154 forum posts
479 photos

Some time ago I would have answered "every time". And, it beats me why there was a need to market "accelerator" for this stuff.

Anyway. I recently discovered that 0.5mm ID PTFE tube is available on Ebay for a couple of pounds a metre.

My fingers are much happier as a result.

Josip Vrandecic -Mes03/09/2019 19:42:26
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2993 forum posts
260 photos
Initially, 30 years ago, here and there, the rest on my toes happened .... today I'm too old for such a nasty adventure, so it doesn't happen.wink
Geoff Sleath03/09/2019 20:22:17
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3481 forum posts
318 photos

The first Cyano I came across was something called Eastman 910 (at least I assume it was Cyano) when it was used by the Instrument dept at RR to stick strain gauges on engine components under test on either rigs or actual engines. They used to fail as the test progressed so it wasn't perfect but it was probably the best available.

That was in the 1970s/80s. I don't know what they use now - I've been retired 2 years yes

Geoff

Douglas Groutage05/09/2019 15:52:24
10 forum posts
3 photos

Just think what the fumes are doing to your sinuses and internal parts. I have to wear a half face respirator to prevent my sinuses from congealing to a point I can't breath through my nose. Just a whiff will set them off. Its not an allergy it is the glue vapours literally setting my mucous membranes to semi-solid material.

I use the stuff very sparingly. And I also have a fan blowing any fumes away from my face as the glue will also react in a minor way with my eyes as well.

After an 'attack' three days later my breathing will be back to normal.

Don Fry05/09/2019 16:09:59
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4116 forum posts
48 photos

Douglas, there is the old saying, only two things in life are constant, death and taxes. Only half right if powerful and rich enough. But still half right, and breathing is compulsory component of the right. Are you sure you should be using CA at all.

EvilC5705/09/2019 17:49:04
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28 forum posts
14 photos

I find thin cyano to be particularly dangerous, the way it runs around joints and often seems to find my fingers.

Makes 'er indoors laugh sometimes when I go indoors with a section of model firmly attached to my fingers, or two fingers stuck together. I've found the thing is not to panic, and if it's something like a balsa model that can't be put under a warm tap, the sweat from your fingers and a bit of pulling, or the edge of a blunt knife seems to naturally loosen things up after about 20 minutes.

Alan Hilton09/09/2019 13:10:42
109 forum posts

I used to work in the water industry as a operations manager , I used to get phoned at home a lot .One evening I was in my workshop building a manatilla when the phone went (I had an extension in the workshop) .Unfortunatly the aileron I was working on got stuck to my right index finger .The caller was a somewhat irate local councillor who went on and an for about half an hour while the aileron hung off my finger .I started to use latex gloves after this

Alan

Foxfan09/09/2019 14:07:53
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848 forum posts
6 photos

Haha, I'd have just told him calmly that I couldn't speak while I had an aileron stuck to my hand and let him stew on that. After all, he's only a councillor!

Martin

Cuban809/09/2019 14:34:19
2809 forum posts
13 photos
Posted by Geoff Sleath on 03/09/2019 20:22:17:

The first Cyano I came across was something called Eastman 910 (at least I assume it was Cyano) when it was used by the Instrument dept at RR to stick strain gauges on engine components under test on either rigs or actual engines. They used to fail as the test progressed so it wasn't perfect but it was probably the best available.

That was in the 1970s/80s. I don't know what they use now - I've been retired 2 years yes

Geoff

You've reminded me Geoff, I think I first came across a similar adhesive when I was working at Imperial College, London for a while, also in the mid 70s. The firm that I worked for engaged IC to do some very expensive strain gauge investigations on experimental light weight diecastings and I had to build up some very complex machinery PDQ after the strain gauges had been glued on so the equipment could be run and tested - it was very time dependent for some reason IIRC and quite a responsibility for a young technician in my early twenties. Happy days.

Foxfan09/09/2019 14:37:50
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848 forum posts
6 photos

First superglue I ever encountered was a tiny phial of reddish Loctite that came with the very complex MRRC 4 wheel drive 1/32nd scale slot car kits of the Marcedes W 154 and that was well back in the 60s. It was used on all the tiny screws to stop them vibrating apart when racing. Find one in its box today and you could buy a new Laser with the proceeds.

Martin

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