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Alaskan Air National Guard Version

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dirk tinck06/05/2020 16:37:40
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644 forum posts
893 photos

I always go round the part with a foam roll .This way ,the cloth stick's a little further than the centerline and i'm sure i have some overlap from the opposite side.20200310_213749.jpg

Steve McLaren09/05/2020 15:22:56
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253 forum posts
261 photos

Thanks for the tip Dirk. I'll try that on the next pieces. I'm hoping to do a bit more today. But I've only got 4 of those foam rollers and I'm struggling to find a supply during this lock-down! I was saving them for the main panels, but maybe I'll try to do more parts in a single batch.

Steve McLaren05/07/2020 22:10:38
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253 forum posts
261 photos

Almost a month since I made an entry on this blog, and I'm still on glassing! It's a slow process ( the way I do it!).

I did the wing first, and I used the foam roller technique as recommended by Dirk. I found the rollers excellent for spreading the resin without dragging the cloth around and for making sure everything was well stuck down.

Since all the advice seems to be about not adding too much resin and making your model heavy, I was quite careful in using what I thought was just enough resin to get everything to stick down and look uniform.

wing glassing.jpg

But when I came to put some primer onto the surfaces later, I found that I hadn't used enough resin to fill the weave, and so I was getting this 'pin-holing' effect.

pinholing.jpg

I tried on one of the tailplanes to just keep adding primer and sanding back, until the weave was full and the pinholes disappeared, but it took 6 coats! I figured that was going to get expensive in paint, on the bigger surfaces, so I asked advice from the regular glass cloth users.

The solution was to apply another coat of resin - again with a roller, but scraping off as much excess as possible with a credit card. I found it was necessary to roll a bit more after scraping to get a uniform finish, but this seemed to work. The resulting surface would take the primer with very few pin-holes appearing even on the first coat.

So now I have done most of the fuselage too. There are a just a few fiddly little bits around the nose and tail-pipe to sort out before I can get onto painting that.

I did the fuselage in 4 operations + 2 more for the fin. Hence why it takes a long time to get this far.

I found it very difficult to get the planked fuselage smooth enough, so I am expecting to be doing quite a lot of skimming with filler on top of the glass cloth.

fuselage glassing.jpg

dirk tinck05/07/2020 22:21:32
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644 forum posts
893 photos

Looking real good there Steve ! The amount of resin in the glassing process is a story of trial and error as we all use different materials i guess.

Phil Cooke09/07/2020 22:48:21
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2619 forum posts
1836 photos

Great work Steve, good to see it all in glass - you have leapt ahead as my fus is still in final sanding - like you've reported I'm also struggling to get the smooth curved finish I'd expect in certain areas prior to the glass going on...

Anyway work has stopped for a while as I prep for the weekend but I must refocus after our first flying session next week!

Steve McLaren26/07/2020 21:17:05
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253 forum posts
261 photos

As I suspected, when I applied a coat of primer to the fuselage, I found quite a few flat spots and ridges and all sorts of other defects in the shape!

However I have found that off-cuts of 3mm depron make quite a good filler spreader which you can form to the general curvature of the fuselage. I'm hopeful that this will allow me to achieve a reasonably smooth curve over most of the fuselage. Its certainly easier to do this after the glassing/priming when you can see the shape a lot better.

But I think I've got a few more cycles of paint>fill>sand to go yet.

fuse primer.jpg

Phil Cooke27/07/2020 08:26:05
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2619 forum posts
1836 photos

Looks good to me Steve, good progress!

Can I ask - if you are applying filler on top of the glass - what type of filler are you using and will that be suitable for paint or does the filler itself need another coat of resin to seal it once you are happy with the local shape?

Steve McLaren27/07/2020 20:54:45
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253 forum posts
261 photos

Hi Phil, I'm using Isopon P38 car body filler on top of the glass so that I can spray the primer directly on it. Heavy I know! But I'm hoping it will only be a few thin slivers here and there! Obviously it would be better to have spent more time getting it right with lightweight filler before glassing, but I found it very difficult with the pattern and texture created by the planking.

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