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Thinking aloud about Spits...

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Foxfan07/09/2019 13:30:21
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928 forum posts
7 photos

A long way ahead maybe, but I was talking Spitfires with a friend and I said how difficult they are to fly alegedly.

Now, I would love a model Spit, like most folk, but I don't do cowpoo cammo, so mine would have to be the Cleveland Racer in bare metal. It was a Mk XIV e bubble top with the clipped wings.

Would this be any harder to fly than, say, a Mk. IX? Maybe easier with the squarer wing tips?

Is there a plan of this particular kite?

I would only want a tiddler. Maybe a 4-5 footer.

And lastly, how would I get on with an all bare metal finish where radio is concerned? I'm only thinking aloud and am aware of all the pitfalls for anyone, never mind a newbie.

Martin

Peter Christy07/09/2019 16:21:56
1769 forum posts

My limited experience of model Spits (had it about 18 months) is that the well designed ones are no more difficult to fly than any low-winger. The tricky bit is the landing!

A combination of narrow track undercarriage, small (scale) wheels, and wheels close to the CofG makes them prone to nosing over on landing. Take-offs usually aren't a problem, as we tend to over-power our models!

If you have a nice smooth runway (short grass or solid), a Spit shouldn't be a problem. Beware of trying to slow it too much on the approach, and if using full flaps, keep a bit of power on until just about to touch down.

Otherwise they are generally very nice to fly.

--

Pete

fly boy307/09/2019 16:44:43
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3670 forum posts
22 photos

I always thought that "warbirds" were more difficult to land due to a faster approach, and that this was caused by this type of model having a quite high wing loading. Could be wrong here, but if a lighter model could be built, I assume the landing speed would be lower ? Cheers

Colin Leighfield07/09/2019 17:46:44
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5993 forum posts
2503 photos

The full size Spitfire in some versions with flaps and wheels down had a stalling speed as low as 58 mph.

Martian07/09/2019 17:58:07
2461 forum posts
1157 photos

Maybe consider the Silver Spitfire currently doing an around the world flight . Www.silverspitfire.com

Martian07/09/2019 18:00:27
2461 forum posts
1157 photos

It's a mk ix

Peter Miller07/09/2019 18:12:01
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10940 forum posts
1272 photos
10 articles

Do a PR spit in duck egg blue

Foxfan07/09/2019 18:52:14
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928 forum posts
7 photos

I don't do military, Peter, although a PR wouldn't be a bad idea if the natural metal finish was difficult. The polished finish of the silver Spitfire is so nice, but a pain in the butt to reproduce. Hmm, actually, I rather like PR blue.....

Interesting to hear that you chaps don't think it especially difficult to fly. Encouraging, if a bit anti the received wisdom. We have a lovely old chap in the club who flies a small foam Thunderbolt (very similar wings to a Spit.) as smooth as silk. It's a real example to us all. He has no trouble with it ever. The odd thing is when you look at it close up it's as scarred, creased, repaired and tatty as anything could be that can still fly! So Heaven knows when he did all that!

Any views on the bare metal finish affecting radio? Or whether the square wing tips are less likely to tip stall?

Martin

Don Fry07/09/2019 19:14:16
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4557 forum posts
54 photos

At 4 to five foot, your enemy is weight. Metal finish is not good.

If you don't like military, on a fighter, why not a great uncle, a S6B.

Edit, not a great idea, metal, though Mr Nighous did a good one. Spelling problem. 

Edited By Don Fry on 07/09/2019 19:41:22

Foxfan07/09/2019 19:18:43
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928 forum posts
7 photos

Don, an S6B would be wonderful, but I have nowhere to run a float plane. I'm not obsessed with a Spit., but it would be nice. What about making one in Depron to keep it really light? I simply don't have space for bigger 'planes.

Martin

J D 807/09/2019 19:21:34
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1438 forum posts
84 photos

The standard full size Spitfire wing has at least 3 degrees of washout and to counter tip stalling.

The squared wing tip was an adaption to improve roll rate for operations at low level.

Cuban807/09/2019 20:18:05
2904 forum posts
1 photos

My Brian Taylor Mk 1a Spit 70" (Geoffrey Weĺlum markings) a delight to fly, no vices just handles like a good sports model should when up and away...............except it will punish you if you get the landing circuit wrong and rush the finals. Stalling will only get you if you really push it and it'll only flick if you really get it wrong - too slow and too much up will be the killer.

Caught me out last week when dumb thumbs on the take off roll had the model in air too soon without enough air speed. Only a couple of feet off the ground so the stall and slide to the left just took out a retract mount. Very, very lucky and a warning to never relax with this type of model. Can lull you into a false sense of security. 

Edited By Cuban8 on 07/09/2019 20:24:24

Former Member07/09/2019 20:42:41
3577 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Former Member07/09/2019 20:44:04
3577 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Peter Miller07/09/2019 20:51:17
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10940 forum posts
1272 photos
10 articles

Here is a reference source that might help. Should be some painted aircraft in there

**LINK**

Colin Leighfield07/09/2019 21:53:10
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5993 forum posts
2503 photos

All Spitfires from the prototype to the Mk24 had 2.5 degrees of washout from root to top, with positive incidence of +2 degrees at the root and negative -0.5 at the tip. They didn’t tip stall. Generally poor handling models of Spitfires are lacking in wash out and also may have non-scale wing section. The full-size was one of the best handling of all WW2 fighters and considered to be easy to fly. The Hurricane had a sharper stall and would drop a wing when it happened.

Foxfan07/09/2019 22:48:16
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928 forum posts
7 photos

So where does this almost universal belief that a model Spitfire will always re-kit itself in double quick time come from?

I'm delighted you gents all seem to think otherwise.

The blue scheme is nice, but not the double cockpit. I take it good silver paint or silver iron on film doesn't affect the R/C signal so badly as ally or ally tape?

Martin

Former Member07/09/2019 23:21:31
3577 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

Dad_flyer07/09/2019 23:26:10
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278 forum posts
306 photos

There was a red one that used to do shows apparently. It was the wings of one spit, and fuse of another. "Red spitfire" search will get you pictures.

If scale detail is not required, then a fun fighter style model can look good in the air. With hand launch and belly landing you lose any ground handling problems. A FliteTest foam board spit takes you even further from scale, supposedly in the direction of easy flying.

Nigel Grant 108/09/2019 00:04:00
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65 forum posts
10 photos

Only want a tiddler at 2" less than 4 foot you could do Tony Nijhuis's 46"spit featured on his website and was originally an RCM&E plan. There's a link on the web page for this model to the original article and the model started out in silver film before it was then painted. He does at least one larger one but this one would be a handy size for electric or a 30FS. There is at least one build article on this forum where retracts were fitted. Personally, I would go with the original design which was hand launch and belly landing. This keeps the weight down and does away with the two most difficult parts of any flight - well for me anyway.

**LINK**

Nigel

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