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Irvine 61 new bearings

Advice on removal of prop driver

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Phil B17/09/2019 22:39:12
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120 forum posts
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I have done many new bearings jobs and know most of the techniques but this Irvine 61 Sport (plain colour not red) has me temporarily baffled as the prop driver does not want to come off, to allow the crankshaft to move out through the rear crankcase.

Is it just a friction fit, so that warming the whole unit and a light tap on the front dislodge it, or is it keyed in some way?

Advice or possibly a scan of the engines parts diagram would be gratefully received if anyone can help.

Martin Harris17/09/2019 22:48:28
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8808 forum posts
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This thread may be your friend...

As far as I'm aware, the 61 will use the same tapered collet system as the 53, 46, 40, 25 etc.

Edited By Martin Harris on 17/09/2019 22:52:58

Denis Watkins17/09/2019 23:20:15
3883 forum posts
60 photos

Just as you say Phil, warm and tap

Don't spend days awaiting expensive pullers

If necessary, freeze the motor 1st,

Then warm and tap

Edited By Denis Watkins on 17/09/2019 23:21:00

Jason-I18/09/2019 06:48:19
224 forum posts
37 photos

I also have an Irvine 61 sport, that has been unused for 20 years and is in need of new bearings. Do you know what bearings fit this and where to get them from? Also, what about the crankcase rear gasket - make one, buy one, or gasket goo?

Denis Watkins18/09/2019 06:57:58
3883 forum posts
60 photos

Modelfixings.co.uk Jason

Look in bearings !ist

SIMON CRAGG18/09/2019 07:28:57
441 forum posts
14 photos

I changed the bearings in the same engine a few days ago.

The prop driver was locked solid, but careful heat from a blow lamp freed it off easily.

Bearings replaced for £12.00 from bearing company near where I live (take the old ones with you, so they can measure exactly.

Never had to replace a rear gasket, but would probably use gasket goo carefully, as prices for these items are mad these days.

Engine runs like a clock!.

Peter Miller18/09/2019 08:22:40
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Posted by SIMON CRAGG on 18/09/2019 07:28:57:

I changed the bearings in the same engine a few days ago.

The prop driver was locked solid, but careful heat from a blow lamp freed it off easily.

Bearings replaced for £12.00 from bearing company near where I live (take the old ones with you, so they can measure exactly.

Never had to replace a rear gasket, but would probably use gasket goo carefully, as prices for these items are mad these days.

Engine runs like a clock!.

 

You can buy very thin gasket paper or possibly scrounge a small piece from a local engineering works.

Wipe thin oil on the rear of the crankcase and press on the paper. This will leave the shape on the paper.

Cut out ad Bobs your Uncle

Edited By Peter Miller on 18/09/2019 08:23:39

Nigel R18/09/2019 09:30:20
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3065 forum posts
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Plain old newspaper works as a gasket here, IME.

Scalpel blade in a compass works wonders to make a lovely circular hole.

Then soak the paper in oil before tightening the backplate up and lastly cutting the excess off.

Jason-I18/09/2019 09:46:21
224 forum posts
37 photos

Thanks for the info guys!

Also looking for a 10cc sized 'ultra stick'  style plan........

Edited By Jason-I on 18/09/2019 09:51:05

Engine Doctor18/09/2019 09:50:57
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Sorry double post ?

Edited By Engine Doctor on 18/09/2019 09:58:56

Engine Doctor18/09/2019 09:57:23
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If you try the tap method ( not recommended ) make sure you screw the nut on the crankshaft to protect the thread.

Heat will release it but can often anneal the alloy if your not careful and get it too hot . The prop driver is then soft and can spread when used losing grip and come loose.

A puller is the only way to safely remove a tapered collet type prop driver. They can be very stubborn but quickly surrender to a puller. Pullers can be found on eBay for around £5 and don't take too long to arrive.

Bearings are available from many sources an Simply Bearing are IMO the best and quickest suppliers. Visit their website and it will show you how to measure the bearings . You will need a Vernier gauge . Model fixings may have the engine on their list so measuring the bearing will not be necessary .

Making gaskets is easy and my preferred material is thick brown envelope paper.

Jim Carss18/09/2019 17:30:01
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2066 forum posts
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Try a simultaneous tap to both sides of the prop driver,motor mechanics use this method to release tapered shafts on ball joints.

yes

Martin Harris18/09/2019 19:33:27
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8808 forum posts
216 photos

While it certainly works with forged steel components under a small amount of tension (although the ball joint I separated earlier this afternoon on my Series 1 Land Rover that hasn't been disturbed in at least 35 years refused to yield and needed an extractor) I'm not so sure that there isn't a risk of distorting the soft aluminium of a typical prop driver.

Jonathan W18/09/2019 19:49:09
101 forum posts
11 photos

Aye, I'm no longer surprised that I see so many engines with butchered prop drivers and damaged crank threads, when I read the bodges espoused on this and other threads!! Mixed in with some sound good advice of course smiley Nothing works better than the right tools for the job.

Phil B18/09/2019 21:26:18
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120 forum posts
102 photos

Thanks all for the contributions.

After considering all the above, I put the crankcase /shaft/prop driver assembly in the oven at 135 deg c for 20 mins, then holding the crankcase in a glove, lightly tapped the driver all round with the further edge against a mallet. Then, having previously locked two nuts right on the end of the threaded stub shaft, a sharp but not hard tap with a small pin hammer with hardwood interposed and the crankshaft popped out through the driver and front bearing, to b extracted through the rear with big rear bearing attached.

Getting the front bearing out was easy with a drift and light tap.

However the rear bearing is locked tight on the crankshaft. I've left this soaking in plus gas overnight as I thi k it is gummed castor gluing the bearing on. If all else fails I may have to open the bearing outer then work on the inner.

Jonathan W18/09/2019 22:16:43
101 forum posts
11 photos

That is where the bearing splitter mentioned in the other thread comes in handy. The knife edges of the splitter will get into the small gap between the bearing and the crank web.

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