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A Terrifying story

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Peter Miller01/10/2019 15:41:15
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Today I had to use a bus to get home having left my car at a garage for service etc. It was a wet day but I took the front seat on top of the bus.

WE came to a stop in the main street in Lavenham, the widest part of the street.

In front of us a very elderly lady with two sticks was being helped across the street by a younger lady. IT took over a minute for her to make it across the road which was really only just two lanes wide, even a passing car coming the other way had to wait.

Eventually the poor old dear made it to the other side.

Then she got into the drivers seat of a car!!

I made a comment and the couple beside me were in fits of laughter

Trevor01/10/2019 16:11:25
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Well, you didn’t expect her to walk all the way home did you?

will -001/10/2019 16:24:28
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Yeah old age is pretty terrifying isn't it........

Cuban801/10/2019 16:53:25
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An elderly neighbour, now sadly departed, was stopped by a traffic cop.............for driving too slowly to the eye dept at the hospital. I kid you not. We were unaware that she was more or less blind and was highly indignant at the time that her licence was subsequently revoked.

You can sort of understand it, I'd be totally lost without a car and will be driving & riding for as long as possible, but there does come a time when enough's enough.

Same sort of problem with very elderly club members that just won't give in but terrify the living daylights out of everyone else. Usually poor vision or very shakey on their pins. Horrible job, but sometimes the only answer is to ground them before a serious accident, or have them carry on via a buddy box. Some accept it, others unfortunately, and despite being as tactful as possible to protect them, do get quite bolshy.

 

Edited By Cuban8 on 01/10/2019 16:58:30

john stones 101/10/2019 17:05:09
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Just to add some balance, we have a club member who walking is an issue to, he drives no bother thankfully for him, automatic car I believe.

Erfolg01/10/2019 17:08:51
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Of course the way to less accidents per age group is to take all the licences from the young.smiley

Geoff Sleath01/10/2019 17:42:42
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My father had a TB hip which meant that as a teenager in the 1920s (no artificial hips then) his right femur was shortened by cutting off the head and pinned to his pelvis at a slight angle. Ever afterwards he wore a surgical boot on his right foot which was built up by 5 or 6 inches. He drove well all his life (I've even got photos of him motorcycling in the mid 30s). However, as he got older,walking got more difficult mainly because his back, having been working at an odd angle for decades, was giving up. So you might have seen him walking with difficulty but perfectly able to drive. He never had an automatic and the only changes he made to his cars was to ensure the seat was firm and a bit higher.

I was felt he was built like Charles Atlas from the waist up because of using crutches when he was younger but his right leg had no nuscle at all. He was very strong except at the very end when he wasn't driving. When he was in a hurry he would run a couple of steps and then hop - I used to copy him and thought that when I grew up I'd have a big boot, too

Though I can't judge the case Peter cites don't assume because someone has walking problems they aren't capable of driving.

Geoff

Peter Miller01/10/2019 18:12:26
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Well a couple of years ago or so one elderly gentleman drove onto a pavement and killed a young lady.

But I do ask,if the old lady has such trouble walking, how fast could she get on the brakes in an emergency.

My next door nieghbour used to taken around by another old lady. My NDN used to be terrified because her driver would wander all over the road and usualy drove right out in the middle.

Bob Cotsford01/10/2019 18:48:50
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She may well have had a hand control conversion Peter. As has been pointed out, lower limb or spinal deficiency doesn't have to mean the upper body or mind are defective. Even one duff leg can lead to loss of confidence when walking but need not affect you once seated.

John Stainforth01/10/2019 18:57:06
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I have just had to apply for an over 70's driving license. This can be done completely online; no forms have to be posted in, and new photographs. As far as eyesight is concerned, one just has to tick a box stating that one's eyesight is OK for driving. In the USA, every time one has to get a driving license renewed (which is every five or ten years), one has to go in person to a local driving test center where one is photographed and given an eye test on the spot. That seems far more sensible to me than our system.

john stones 101/10/2019 19:05:37
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Posted by John Stainforth on 01/10/2019 18:57:06:

I have just had to apply for an over 70's driving license. This can be done completely online; no forms have to be posted in, and new photographs. As far as eyesight is concerned, one just has to tick a box stating that one's eyesight is OK for driving. In the USA, every time one has to get a driving license renewed (which is every five or ten years), one has to go in person to a local driving test center where one is photographed and given an eye test on the spot. That seems far more sensible to me than our system.

Oooh us old folk wouldn't like that, I pay taxes you know, some young pup saying I can't drive anymore, what's the World coming to, who's gonna pay for all these tests ? ME oooh no, it's not the money you understand, it's the principle, next you'll be saying I shouldn't really be flying. face 1

Peter Christy01/10/2019 19:07:40
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Thanks for reminding me! That's something I'll have to do early next year!

Luckily, I'm still reasonably fit and my eyesight is still adequate. My dad was still driving into his 80s, and finally gave up still accident free! And let's not forget Ken Wallis, who took the CAA to court for trying to take away his pilot's license! He was still flying autogyros into his 90s!

Its not a simple matter of age. I would argue that as one gets older, experience teaches you to avoid a lot of situations that younger drivers head blindly into - younger eyesight notwithstanding! wink

Its more a case of keeping active and reasonably fit. I reckon as long as I can fly my models, my eyesight will be good enough for driving!

smiley

--

Pete

Colin Leighfield01/10/2019 19:29:52
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My biggest problem with advancing age is that my long term memory is very good and consistently fools me into forgetting that I am now in the departure lounge and getting closer to the exit every day. I drift around blissfully unaware until I come across a mirror and nearly have a heart attack because I see dad looking back at me and he’s been dead for thirty years. When it sinks in that the old codger staring at me is myself I have to go and lie down for half an hour to recover.

When I have had medical check ups over the last ten years or so the quack seems very concerned that I don’t exceed a heart rate of 130 on the treadmill. A while ago I thought I should start taking these things seriously so bought myself a Fitbit Versa. When I nip off for an hour or so on my bicycle I find that I average a heart rate for the hour of typically 136 and peak at around 170. Clearly I am living on borrowed time. My right knee is on it’s last legs (true) and most of the movement in my right wrist has gone, causing problems with the twist grip on the motorbike and holding a pint. Trying to change to left handed isn’t going very well and I find that the only way I can do that on the motorbike is to sit on it backwards. That didn’t work very well on my ride round Brittany and the French West coast on the Honda last month. Fortunately I have found a piece of kit called a “throttle-easy” that seems to provide an answer.

Carry on regardless.

kevin b01/10/2019 20:00:01
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Colin.

Have you considered not holding the pint whilst trying to operate the twist grip on your motorbike ?

wink

Tom Sharp 201/10/2019 20:07:38
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Peter, is the Lavenham you refer to the town where part of Whichfinder General was filmed.

Geoff Sleath01/10/2019 20:42:36
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Posted by Colin Leighfield on 01/10/2019 19:29:52:

My biggest problem with advancing age is that my long term memory is very good and consistently fools me into forgetting that I am now in the departure lounge and getting closer to the exit every day. I drift around blissfully unaware until I come across a mirror and nearly have a heart attack because I see dad looking back at me and he’s been dead for thirty years. When it sinks in that the old codger staring at me is myself I have to go and lie down for half an hour to recover.

When I have had medical check ups over the last ten years or so the quack seems very concerned that I don’t exceed a heart rate of 130 on the treadmill. A while ago I thought I should start taking these things seriously so bought myself a Fitbit Versa. When I nip off for an hour or so on my bicycle I find that I average a heart rate for the hour of typically 136 and peak at around 170. Clearly I am living on borrowed time. My right knee is on it’s last legs (true) and most of the movement in my right wrist has gone, causing problems with the twist grip on the motorbike and holding a pint. Trying to change to left handed isn’t going very well and I find that the only way I can do that on the motorbike is to sit on it backwards. That didn’t work very well on my ride round Brittany and the French West coast on the Honda last month. Fortunately I have found a piece of kit called a “throttle-easy” that seems to provide an answer.

Carry on regardless.

The rule of thumb for maximum heart rate is 220 minus your age, so, in my case, 140. I have a fairly low pulse rate. When I was bored in meetings at work I'd check my pulse and it was always 52 - and that was in spite of (or perhaps because of) my 13 mile bike ride in from home. Even if I go flat out on the turbo now I can't get it over 150.

I physically can't run so a treadmill isn't much use in my case. Though I can walk quite fast up hill, I'm rubbish going down.

Even when I was riding the occasional time trial I never actually trained and relied on my work and touring miles.

Geoff

Tom Sharp 201/10/2019 21:07:05
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When I was a youth in the 1960s, our local garage, fairly large for it's time, used to sell second hand cars as well as servicing petrol etc.

The owner had lost his right arm in the war but he still drove and did the car selling.

Now going for a demonstration drive with him driving was truly terrifying as I found out when my dad and I went for a test drive with him.

Peter Miller01/10/2019 21:07:35
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Posted by Tom Sharp 2 on 01/10/2019 20:07:38:

Peter, is the Lavenham you refer to the town where part of Whichfinder General was filmed.

Very likely as it is almost unspoilt and TV aerials etc are not allowed.Go there in the summer or should I say tourist season and you can't move.

I once went there at about 6.30 am on a Summer morning and spent an hour wandering round taking photos.Not a soul or car in the place.Sensational.

I live about 8 miles away.

Peter Miller01/10/2019 21:11:05
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I have just renewed my driving licence for the fourth time.

These days I don't even have to wear glasses which I have worn since I was sixteen.

I will not tell you what my resting heart rate is.

Peter Miller01/10/2019 21:17:15
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I will just say that after reading all your posts it has been a great relief.

In future if I see someone with a white stick, and totally paralysed getting in to the driving seat of a car I will feel totally confident that they are perfectly safe to drive

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