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BMFA 'B' Test Video Available

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Capt Kremen07/10/2019 12:07:44
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299 forum posts
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Just to let folks know, the BMFA have now released a guide to flying the BMFA 'B' Test.

Note: You are advised to have viewed the previous two videos (BMFA 'A' Test and Introduction/Pre-Flight Checks First).

Thanks to Peter Willis, Duncan Mcclure and all involved in the production of these very welcome guides for prospective candidates as well as their BMFA examiners!

Mark Elen07/10/2019 12:28:18
401 forum posts
738 photos

Its here:

**LINK**

Cheers

Mark

Geoff Sleath07/10/2019 13:20:07
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3429 forum posts
297 photos

Looks very good. I'll be unlikely to take it myself although I think I could cope with the flying part with a bit of practice. It's the questions that put me off, particularly the regulations applying to model air shows which are of of no interest to me. If I were to be involved in organising a show I'd simply look up the rules and recommendations rather than relying on memory.

Very pleased to see a Sopwith Pup in the opening sequence in view of my current build yes

Geoff

Capt Kremen07/10/2019 13:37:16
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Geoff, having recently attended a BMFA Achievement Scheme Roadshow where Peter Willis and the BMFA team went through the whole process and ethos of the Achievement Scheme, I think I can reasonably assure you that you have nothing to fear.

Assuming your examiner is not pedantic, (unlikely), and asks about legislation and ruling that is not applicable to your type/style of flying i.e. you are not a display pilot, 'drone' pilot etc. etc. the test is about your achieving and satisfying yourself in your abilities to fly safely, with due regard to your fellow fliers, property and the environment.

As a mainly fixed wing flier myself, although technically able to be part of, for example a Helicopter or 'Quadcopter' test, personally I would feel I lack the day-to-day understanding of those types and their operation. Whilst the tests require some mandatory questions, if I were examining you as a non-display pilot, I can very easily find plenty of other relevant questions that do apply to your flying and which you as an experienced flier no doubt already know.

I'm sure you fly with care and purpose so taking this straightforward test merely adds to your personal satisfaction and sense of achievement.

Go on have a go, I'm sure you will enjoy it.

Frank Skilbeck07/10/2019 14:41:46
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4488 forum posts
101 photos

Yep we just had a roadshow and I did the B demo (and then passed the B later in the day...............), examiner wasn't looking for a word perfect answer to the questions, if you have read up on the latest rules and your club rules then you should have no problems.

BTW glad to see the workshop/garage is as well organised as mine..................................

Tom Sharp 207/10/2019 18:46:31
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3550 forum posts
18 photos

OK here we go. In the opening shots of the B test film a modeller starts his engine then removes the glow stick by reaching over the rotating prop exposing his wrist to potential life threatening injuries. An immediate fail.

Edited By Tom Sharp 2 on 07/10/2019 19:01:53

stu knowles07/10/2019 18:58:19
572 forum posts
44 photos

and nothing happens

john stones 107/10/2019 19:16:29
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Posted by Capt Kremen on 07/10/2019 13:37:16:

Geoff, having recently attended a BMFA Achievement Scheme Roadshow where Peter Willis and the BMFA team went through the whole process and ethos of the Achievement Scheme, I think I can reasonably assure you that you have nothing to fear.

Assuming your examiner is not pedantic, (unlikely), and asks about legislation and ruling that is not applicable to your type/style of flying i.e. you are not a display pilot, 'drone' pilot etc. etc. the test is about your achieving and satisfying yourself in your abilities to fly safely, with due regard to your fellow fliers, property and the environment.

As a mainly fixed wing flier myself, although technically able to be part of, for example a Helicopter or 'Quadcopter' test, personally I would feel I lack the day-to-day understanding of those types and their operation. Whilst the tests require some mandatory questions, if I were examining you as a non-display pilot, I can very easily find plenty of other relevant questions that do apply to your flying and which you as an experienced flier no doubt already know.

I'm sure you fly with care and purpose so taking this straightforward test merely adds to your personal satisfaction and sense of achievement.

Go on have a go, I'm sure you will enjoy it.

Pedants may be more numerous than you think, been to a roadshow or two where they just love the sound of their own voice.

john stones 107/10/2019 19:22:42
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10704 forum posts
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Fella had hold of the glow battery to keep it on, took care to remove it safely in my eyes, are we gonna question the youngster helping next ?

Tom Sharp 207/10/2019 19:43:02
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3550 forum posts
18 photos

Holding the glow plug on from the front of the aircraft while starting. Instant fail.

john stones 107/10/2019 19:47:58
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10704 forum posts
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Is it ? Can you hold the nose section from the front, whilst you start ?

Tom Sharp 207/10/2019 19:52:25
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3550 forum posts
18 photos

Time to call in the experts for a professional opinion. laugh

john stones 107/10/2019 19:56:33
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10704 forum posts
1480 photos
Posted by Tom Sharp 2 on 07/10/2019 19:52:25:

Time to call in the experts for a professional opinion. laugh

How can you use a starter without holding the model, to prevent it being pushed back ?

How many rules and regs we gonna end up with, how many helpers will we need, what standard shall these need to be trained to ? Last few years have seemed nowt but nit pick to me.

Brian Cooper07/10/2019 20:31:46
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449 forum posts
20 photos

Personally, I would not fail someone for removing their glow battery from the front.

Martin Harris07/10/2019 20:32:19
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8872 forum posts
221 photos

While I teach newcomers to remove the glow clip from behind the prop right from the start and encourage the practice whenever possible, unless you can correct me Tom, I don't believe that this practice is mandated or even advised in the BMFA handbook, A Flying Start or CAP 658. I would not automatically fail someone for holding the glow as in the video if there was awareness of the hazard - you could see the operator was aware of the proximity of the prop by his slightly exaggerated movements - although I would discuss the advisability and alternatives.

Edited By Martin Harris on 07/10/2019 20:32:59

Don Fry07/10/2019 20:43:24
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4049 forum posts
46 photos

Don't much care, but keep those meaty bits out of the prop arc.

Tom Sharp 208/10/2019 01:42:18
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3550 forum posts
18 photos

Having watched the video's it would seem that IC engines are no longer relevant to the tests. So the glowstick problem I mentioned has gone away.

Andy4808/10/2019 13:48:18
1389 forum posts
1 photos

A couple of interesting points.

1. Not connecting the battery of an electric model until nearly on the runway.

2. Taking the tx onto to runway whilst collecting a model as opposed to leaving it either with a helper or on the ground.

Both very sensible in my opinion, but both frowned upon in my club.

 

Edited By Andy48 on 08/10/2019 13:48:54

Brian Cooper08/10/2019 13:54:06
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449 forum posts
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Ohhh, I.C. engines haven't quite "had their day" yet. . At three clubs I fly at, electric power accounts for approximately 20% of the aircraft.

The smaller glow engines (up to around .25) have been replaced by electric. . Models from .40 size to 1.20 size are still glow powered. Anything bigger than that is powered with petrol engines.

B.C.

Martin Harris08/10/2019 15:29:11
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8872 forum posts
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Posted by Andy48 on 08/10/2019 13:48:18:

A couple of interesting points.

1. Not connecting the battery of an electric model until nearly on the runway.

2. Taking the tx onto to runway whilst collecting a model as opposed to leaving it either with a helper or on the ground.

Both very sensible in my opinion, but both frowned upon in my club.

Time you got your club to move into the 21st Century...while normal practice at my club is to connect flight batteries on dedicated benches at the front of the pits, there's no reason why people can't some do) connect their batteries on the flight line. Perhaps raise a question at your next AGM supported by evidence such as the BMFA video. On the subject, I'd always recommend and encourage the use of throttle kill switches however and wherever the battery is connected.

On the somewhat premature reporting of the demise of IC, it's encouraging that some newer pilots at our club have moved up to IC after doing their initial training on electric models...perhaps the beginning of a trend? I hope so...

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