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Repairing a 3D Angel "Jigsaw"

Following a fuselage front end wreck, can a modern artf be repaired?

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cymaz13/11/2019 07:45:33
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9273 forum posts
1200 photos

I admire your patience and tenacity

Phil B13/11/2019 19:15:14
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210 forum posts
196 photos

Final flattening of sides, checking fitting of wing mounting before covering the repaired sides. Canopy and cowl repairs and fittings next.

img_20191113_173404.jpg

Colin Carpenter13/11/2019 19:59:32
645 forum posts
36 photos

Cracking job ! I would have purchased a new one !😂😂

Phil B14/11/2019 11:55:32
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210 forum posts
196 photos

Thanks for positive comments.

Having fitted the wings, I'm thinking a little more structure is required following the crash that, on hitting a wing tip, ripped out all the central wing joiner section.

First step an extra cross piece / former from 0.8 ply.

I quite enjoy fretting these and don't need a Cad laser cutter yet!

img_20191114_100223.jpg

Colin Carpenter04/12/2019 18:17:23
645 forum posts
36 photos

Phil ! How’s it progressing ? Colin

Andy Stephenson14/12/2019 14:41:05
180 forum posts
28 photos

I have an almost perfect set of Angel wings that were rescued from a fuz write-off if any one is interested, no reasonable offer refused. Blue colour scheme.

Andy.

mrwood03/03/2020 03:21:40
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5 forum posts
Posted by alex nicol on 02/11/2019 16:35:15:

"...the method I've used is to build a jig to hold/support the structure and cyano all the original parts in place ( no matter how small) once this is done it should be strong enough to handle unsupported.

Next step it to apply lightweight glass cloth on the outside of the fus over the glued parts. Warm the epoxy in the microwave before mixing to reduce the viscosity apply cloth and epoxy then cover with acetate sheet and squeegee any excess epoxy off and leave for 24 hrs to dry. once dry remove the acetate sheet. Done properly it'll leave you a very strong lightweight repair with a smooth glass like finish."

These are good tips, thank you Mr. Nicol.

The OP has made excellent progress; it's quite inspiring really, to see what can be done with a wrecked model. I've several basket cases that could benefit from techniques so thoughtfully demonstrated here.

 

Edited By mrwood on 03/03/2020 03:22:07

Edited By mrwood on 03/03/2020 03:22:34

Phil B27/06/2020 23:17:33
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210 forum posts
196 photos

Finally got back to this project.

I finished the fuse sides, recovered first with lam film, then reapplied the old removed covering.

img_20200620_214725.jpg

Now working on the canopy which was wrecked.

Need to develop some techniques for repairing acetate.

I have another moderately damaged one that I repaired first with fretted ply, fibreglass cloth and cyano (Locktite 401)

img_20200626_174250.jpg

Planking the front which was all moulded acetate.

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Now fixing in a piece of acetate with cyano. Sticks are temporary supports.

Phil B27/06/2020 23:55:02
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210 forum posts
196 photos

The spare wings in blue red white.

One needs repair.

Inserting carbon strips and half ribs prior to sheeting. Oracover peels back and re-sticks quite well with heat. img_20200623_163009.jpg

img_20200625_094323.jpg

The Ali tube is the forward wing locator and needed careful placement. Ply rings reinforce the ribs where it goes through.

Phil B27/06/2020 23:56:48
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210 forum posts
196 photos

The spare wings in blue red white.

One needs repair.

Inserting carbon strips and half ribs prior to sheeting. Oracover peels back and re-sticks quite well with heat. img_20200623_163009.jpg

img_20200625_094323.jpg

The Ali tube is the forward wing locator and needed careful placement. Ply rings reinforce the ribs where it goes through.

img_20200624_141853.jpg

Trevor Crook28/06/2020 08:05:22
982 forum posts
71 photos

Well worth the effort if you are enjoying the work. I've got an Angel 30, and it's a superb flier, and was an expensive model.

Peter Miller28/06/2020 09:22:39
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11204 forum posts
1321 photos
10 articles

The problem with ARTF structures is that while the longitudinal sections of the fretted out parts are quite strong there is NO strength in all the uprights and diagonals so instead of spreading stresses and loads they just break up.

Phil B28/06/2020 09:34:04
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210 forum posts
196 photos

I completely agree with Peter and I've resolved not to buy any artfs again! My problem is in the challenge and in getting a £400 model for £0 because someone else had a bad day!

Phil B28/06/2020 10:24:00
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210 forum posts
196 photos

The fretted plywood grain directions are good on the longitudinals but weak on the diagonals due to the grain direction.

The lightweight artf laser cut ply structure would be strong enough in practice If there were no heavy motor and battery which results in lots of kinetic energy to be dispersed in a hard arrival.

In fairness, full size aircraft don't do well in crashes either!

Bob Cotsford28/06/2020 11:11:14
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8626 forum posts
483 photos

I found canopy glue was the best thing for patching in new acetate/petg or whatever they're blown from. If you can find a similarly tinted pop bottle to cut a patch from the repair would fade into the background - if you're short-sighted and squint a bit cool!

My late friend Dave had a collection of Angel wings, all different colour schemes. I dread to think how many he got through over the years but if he ever damaged a wing he was pretty sure to have a suitable replacement under the benchangel

robert chamberlain01/07/2020 22:21:26
142 forum posts

speaking of rebuilding,--I have a simple question. For years, when building from plans, I have been using a COPING SAW to cut around corners. At least this is what it is called in the U.S.--This hand held saw uses those thin 7 inch or so blades and I have gotten along fine with it. I noticed a bargain motor driven unit called either a scroll or fret saw. We all collect tools and I was wondering if it is used only occasionally or is an important go to tool always in use? Odd question I know, but is this really a "need to have" tool ?Bob in Kansas USA

Dwain Dibley.01/07/2020 22:46:57
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1520 forum posts
1506 photos

Hi Bob, I have one and it is useful quite regularly. I bought it second hand, and it has paid for it self many times over.

It all depends on how much building you do I suppose.

D.D.

Andy Stephenson02/07/2020 00:36:39
180 forum posts
28 photos

Robert,

I have used a Dremel scroll saw for years, mostly for stripping balsa but more recently I obtained a second-hand table-top band saw which I use for almost everything and with the right blade it also cuts metal. The Dremel saw was around £100 about 20 years ago but you can get a band saw for less than that these days. The only disadvantage with the band saw when cutting out shapes is that you can't feed the blade through the workpiece to cut holes. You can't do your self an serious injury with a scroll saw whereas a band saw it's quite a different matter.

A.

Phil B02/07/2020 07:50:02
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210 forum posts
196 photos

Locktite 401 cyano gives an acetate bond that can't be pulled apart when cured and is completely transparent. The only difficulty is in maintaining close contact between the parts during curing. I have had success in welding patches inside the canopy to bridge splits. The result is much stronger than the original. The patches are tidy enough for me.

Phil B02/07/2020 07:56:45
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210 forum posts
196 photos

On the subject of powered fret saws, I too had a 2nd hand one but sold it again as it took up too much space. Likewise the band saw. I only ever use a hand fretsaw now and I find you can cut thin ply just as quickly if you use sharp blades, which are very cheap. The hand saw gives a finer cut and it is easier to follow a line accurately. Take your time and it becomes kind of therapeutic.

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