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JB Weld

How good is it?

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cymaz17/11/2019 17:14:58
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8817 forum posts
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I’m building a weather vane ( can’t say cock any more.....someone will get offended).

I want to glue two copper tubes , one inside the other. I thought about brazing but as they won’t be subject to any temperature or stress I thought it might be easier with JB Weld.

Good idea or no?

Don Fry17/11/2019 17:28:06
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4151 forum posts
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Epoxy?

cymaz17/11/2019 17:36:25
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8817 forum posts
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I could make a wooden bung to stop the epoxy running off down the copper pipe.

I thought that JBW might stay where you put it. Is it as runny as Zap Epoxy?

08fbeb3f-886a-48b9-bf30-38b01515bdb0.jpeg

Edited By cymaz on 17/11/2019 17:42:38

Cuban817/11/2019 17:48:24
2810 forum posts
1 photos

I've used JB weld for a few jobs - extremely strong but quite stiff so needs a lot of mixing and working to make pliable. Should work OK for the weather cock I'd have thought.

cymaz17/11/2019 17:50:24
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8817 forum posts
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Thanks C8, can you gently heat it to make it more workable, as you can with epoxy?

J D 817/11/2019 17:52:24
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1320 forum posts
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As above JB should do the job, if you can roughen surface a bit it will help.

Cuban817/11/2019 17:55:04
2810 forum posts
1 photos

I should mention that I used the high heat putty that you cut off what you need from a ' sausage'. Massively strong, I 'welded' a length of aluminium tube to a flat plate as a test piece. The tube broke before the joint when I tested it. The putty does soften with hand heat as you work it. A bit stiffer than glazing putty, but easy to work into a fillet.

Edited By Cuban8 on 17/11/2019 17:56:48

Wingman17/11/2019 18:00:11
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1110 forum posts
405 photos

Copper pipe? - Solder

paul d17/11/2019 18:10:49
75 forum posts
5 photos

Exactly wingman, really wouldn't bother messing about with glue..

will -017/11/2019 18:26:49
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582 forum posts
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JB weld is basically (as far as I can tell) epoxy thickened with powdered metal.

It is very stiff once mixed although like any epoxy, temperature makes it both more runny and faster setting.

I would use solder for this as if you get the pipe warm enough and it's a good enough fit it should flow up the gap ( plumber's torch etc.)

If you happen to know a plumber who is amenable, it might even be worth asking them to do the job as you'll only get one shot at it.

 

One downside of solder is that if this is going to be outdoors (and that would seem a very good idea for a weather vane) you'll likely get some corrosion around the joint .

Edited By will -0 on 17/11/2019 18:27:08

cymaz17/11/2019 18:28:27
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8817 forum posts
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I would use solder but for two reasons

  1. the joins are quite wide, 2-3mm in some places
  2. I don’t own a big enough gas torch to get enough heat into the workpiece

will -017/11/2019 18:33:43
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582 forum posts
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PS most flying clubs just use a windsock.....

will -017/11/2019 18:37:43
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hello, in that case i'd stlll use solder but look to sleeve the inside pipe first to fill the gap. If necessary, split a pipe lengthways so that it'll go over

cymaz17/11/2019 18:38:19
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8817 forum posts
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Posted by will -0 on 17/11/2019 18:33:43:

PS most flying clubs just use a windsock.....

If it were Wyoming, they would use a length of chain on a stick

Anyway.....this is for Mrs C. heart

Don Fry17/11/2019 19:01:26
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4151 forum posts
48 photos

Lads, for this job, superglue, or even Boss White, will do until Cymas shuffles off this mortal coil. What's easy, in stock?

Mrs C will judge

a. neat

b. does not fall apart.

Geoff Sleath17/11/2019 20:04:53
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3500 forum posts
320 photos

I'm sure JB Weld would do the job very well. It does take at least a day to set properly in my experience but, if you're not in a hurry it really is good stuff. Moreover it's readily available in car spares shops and there are several within 3 miles walking distance for me.

Many years ago I made a Heathkit anemometer and wind direction indicator for the dinghy racing club where we sailed. The display was in the clubroom/bar and was a subject of fascinatíon, especially if the wind's strength made sailing either very difficult or suicidal depending on how brave you were. At least Kingsmill hospital, which made the wind a little unpredictable due to its proximity was handy if a trip to A&E became necessary

Geoff

Malcolm Fisher17/11/2019 20:22:08
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620 forum posts
7 photos

Cymaz,

Solder would be my preferred option, but failing that I would use Milliput epoxy putty. It sets under water which can be an advantage sometimes.

Malcolm

Edited By Malcolm Fisher on 17/11/2019 20:23:22

cymaz17/11/2019 20:38:11
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8817 forum posts
1195 photos
Posted by Don Fry on 17/11/2019 19:01:26:

Lads, for this job, superglue, or even Boss White, will do until Cymas shuffles off this mortal coil. What's easy, in stock?

Mrs C will judge

a. neat

b. does not fall apart.

Cheers Don but I’m not that old ! There’s plenty of years left in the old dog yet ! dog laugh

cymaz17/11/2019 20:39:03
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8817 forum posts
1195 photos
Posted by Malcolm Fisher on 17/11/2019 20:22:08:

Cymaz,

Solder would be my preferred option, but failing that I would use Milliput epoxy putty. It sets under water which can be an advantage sometimes.

Malcolm

Edited By Malcolm Fisher on 17/11/2019 20:23:22

Thanks, will look that up yes

Foxfan18/11/2019 00:18:39
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848 forum posts
6 photos

Milliput is not an adhesive and the slightly different newer formula is even less adhesive (except on your hands). Believe me I make whole model cars from it. I'm on my 7th pack this year. I know Milli.

JBWeld, however, is massively strong and very workable. I know racing car restorers who use it where no other repair has done the job. Engine blocks and even cylinder heads repaired with it . ON RACING CARS!!!

If you can't heat the joint enough for solder, then JBWeld is the answer. I was using it just this evening to glue brass to plastic where there was no room for even a small screw.

BTW, solder won't corrode. It's uncleaned flux that corrodes. My Dad was a proper craftsman plumber and would solder zinc and lead flat roofs, using a half pint blowlamp, a stick of tinman's solder and a tallow pad, but was always very careful to clean the joint thoroughly.

Martin

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