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Plane storage ?

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Ray Hunt-Terry 120/11/2019 10:58:09
2 forum posts

Hi All...

Just getting into model flying after a 30 year break ....

When I did fly I kept my planes etc ina heated garage , but now live in a different house with a detached garage and no heating !

The question is what effect would a cold garage have on airframes during the winter if they were stored there?

Thanks

Ray ...

Chris Walby20/11/2019 12:43:28
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1025 forum posts
238 photos

Cold as long as its not below sub zero I don't think will be an issue. High ambient temp seems to effect coverings and glue on foam models (>25C).

As long as the humidity is quite stable you should be okay (as in brick building), if its a tin shed with a leaky roof then no!

More advice from experts will be along shortly. wink

Bob Cotsford20/11/2019 12:56:31
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8062 forum posts
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A cold garage in winter can leave you with some mould developing on wood just from condensation. My garage is leak free but I still got some light mould showing on ply battery mounts attached to LiPos stored out there the last couple of years. I move all my balsa models up to the spare bedroom at the end of the season - ie once the temperature drops below 15C! I'm leaving the foamies out in the garage this year, there's only so much space indoors.

Ron Gray20/11/2019 12:58:12
1550 forum posts
367 photos

@Bob - nail the foamies to the ceilings and walls, extra insulation will help your fuel bills!

Bob Cotsford20/11/2019 13:02:56
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8062 forum posts
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Posted by Ron Gray on 20/11/2019 12:58:12:

@Bob - nail the foamies to the ceilings and walls, extra insulation will help your fuel bills!

teeth 2 now there's a thought!

Nigel R20/11/2019 13:37:41
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3164 forum posts
486 photos

I suffer a poorly insulated shed (wriggly tin roof, some "ventilation gaps". Condensation is the prime killer.

It will cause mould on wood and rust, corrosion and discolouration on susceptible metal parts.

As long as things are kept out of the open air (in a box, drawer, etc) they survive fine (my experience).

I make wing bags and fuselage "socks" for all my wood airframes, all from cheap radiator foil, gaffer tape & stick on velcro. They also double up quite handily as a way of preventing hangar rash during transport.

Capt Kremen20/11/2019 15:36:47
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307 forum posts
83 photos

My two pennerth ...

(Longer) term storage of some of my models in a well insulated, but dry, 'loft hangar'.

Metal clevis, exposed areas of pushrods, some types of exposed nuts n' bolts e.g. securing control horns - can develop a surface oxidisation/'white' coating to greater or lesser degree. Servo mounting grommets 'harden', servo themselves seem to operate fine after cycling checks. Plug and un-plug servos to 'clean' the contacts/ensure sound electrical contact. (I'm all electric motor systems so no gummy i/c pistons or carbs to free). Electric motor bearings oiled & checked for 'rough' spots. Closed loop wires oxidise, unless wiped over with Vaseline or similar prior to storage. Film coverings can loosen, depending on type and brand. Much lamented Solartex seems most durable. Gliders - Metal wing joiners can oxidise and get stuck if left in fuselages.

Be mindful of leaving a fuselage or u/c resting on a wing or tailplane. This can cause dips and dents in the covering as well as slight warps in control surfaces

Glue joints can 'dry out', become brittle or loose, flake off.

A thorough inspection and check over is essential after long(er) term storage.

Bob Cotsford20/11/2019 16:21:24
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8062 forum posts
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Posted by Nigel R on 20/11/2019 13:37:41:

I suffer a poorly insulated shed (wriggly tin roof, some "ventilation gaps". Condensation is the prime killer.

It will cause mould on wood and rust, corrosion and discolouration on susceptible metal parts.

As long as things are kept out of the open air (in a box, drawer, etc) they survive fine (my experience).

I make wing bags and fuselage "socks" for all my wood airframes, all from cheap radiator foil, gaffer tape & stick on velcro. They also double up quite handily as a way of preventing hangar rash during transport.

I've bought a cheap fire blanket, my intention being to use it as a liner for a metal cabinet in which I will be overwintering my LiPos. I'm hoping that it will stop condensation getting to the balance plugs as few if any of these use gold contacts.

I suppose I could just blast them with ACF50 when I do the pillar drill.face 1

Tim Flyer20/11/2019 16:36:03
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1116 forum posts
214 photos

Obviously making sure there are no roof leaks and proper gutters to carry rain away is most important for a garage . The actual temperature isn’t too important but what is important is keeping the garage at a steady temperature just slightly warmer than the outside air temperature. That reduces condensation and drives dampness out . If the garage isn’t too big a couple of small electric greenhouse heaters or a small thermostatic oil filled radiator on a low setting would work. I use an oil filled radiator in my workshop left on a low setting all winter to keep it dry and prevent condensation on tools.

i12fly20/11/2019 17:00:20
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577 forum posts
21 photos

One item kept in a wood summerhouse, a foamy that doesn't take apart. Some condensation occurs on the inside of the windows so it must have some water ingress. No problems over last winter. Rest of models are indoors in spare room (which is why I don't have petrol!).

Lipos are kept in a damp garage, inside lipo bags placed in metal 'money boxes'. As soon as we start getting frosts (like this week) I put the money boxes on top of homemade light boxes. These are earthed metal biscuit tins with an 11 watt energysaving bulb inside to give a bit of heat. The boxes have a few ventilation holes that enable you to see that the bulbs are on and working, and they will be on until March. In practice in something like -6 C outside, inside the boxes keeps at about 14 to 15C and when the outside is about +10 C, inside the box gets to low 20's. These have performed well over 2 winters.

P.S. I cannot stop the damp in the garage as the neighbours garden is 2ft higher than the damp course so water seeps through the brickwork sadangry

Edited By i12fly on 20/11/2019 17:05:15

Nigel R20/11/2019 17:16:34
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3164 forum posts
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"These are earthed metal biscuit tins with an 11 watt energysaving bulb inside to give a bit of heat."

I like this idea. My lipos are in a cabinet (inside tins), I could use a box like this inside the base of the cabinet.

Ray Hunt-Terry 120/11/2019 17:53:49
2 forum posts

Many thanks to all you guys for your comments !......

Regards

Ray ...

Romeo Whisky20/11/2019 18:06:40
713 forum posts
193 photos

No idea if this would work in a really damp large space, but I've found it works great for other areas where condensation is an issue.

Get a few bags of silca gel cat litter from Home Bargains (you get a large bag for a couple of quid). You can make smaller bags of it up using fine netting such as old net curtains (shake the dust out outside) . Then you can put a bag of it inside each airframe. Also works quite well on the rear parcel shelf of car to help reduce inside condensation on car windows overnight.

Tip... Avoid the brands of silica gel which are perfumed!

eflightray20/11/2019 21:46:59
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590 forum posts
128 photos

My models have been stored in a shed and garage (unheated) for years with no problems other than the dreaded surface mold, and that only attacks one model. Must the something in the finish, (acrylic artists paint).

Those in the garage also share the space with a wet car quite often, (this is Wales).

Transmitters and flight batteries are kept indoors, (small bedroom/workplace), the Lipos are stored in ice cream tubs, have used that method also for years).

Corner of my plastic shed 8ft x 6ft .

shed (2).jpg

Ray.

Edited By eflightray on 20/11/2019 21:48:28

Edited By eflightray on 20/11/2019 21:48:53

Chris Berry20/11/2019 22:23:20
228 forum posts
1 photos

If there is power in the garage then you could put a heater in there. One of the oil filled ones would be good. You could also insulate the roof and even put batons on the walls and fit foam into the cavities.

Bob Cotsford20/11/2019 22:46:37
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8062 forum posts
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I wonder if it's the cast concrete walls or the concrete floor in my shed that causes the issues? Motorbikes and tools were always oiled or sprayed with ACF50 for the winter anyway, I just don't fancy blasting it all over my models laugh. As for insulating the shed, maybe it's time for a nice retirement bungalow with a spare bedroom?

Geoff Sleath20/11/2019 23:44:56
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3488 forum posts
319 photos

When my father retired from the shop/house where he'd lived all my life he and my step mother moved to a bungalow and he built a huge wooden site hut that filled the back garden (I don't know what the neighbours thought!) for his workshop. It was filled with all his tools, drill, lathe etc as well as all the clocks and parts he was planning to occupy his time with.

Sadly before long his disability became too severe and he went to a retirement home whilst my step mother stayed in the house. The workshop was left as it was the last time he was there. He died about 2 years later and we had the job of clearing the workshop. Amazingly there was almost no rust on anything. I put it down to the fact that the wood absorbed any potential condensation (it was unheated but well insulated). Leaving tools etc in my concrete garage is asking for rust and corrosion unless steps are taken to prevent it.

So I would say model storage in a weatherproof wooden building over winter is OK even if no steps are taken to protect them.

Geoff

conrad taggart20/11/2019 23:48:13
99 forum posts
5 photos
Posted by Nigel R on 20/11/2019 17:16:34:

"These are earthed metal biscuit tins with an 11 watt energysaving bulb inside to give a bit of heat."

I like this idea. My lipos are in a cabinet (inside tins), I could use a box like this inside the base of the cabinet.

That bit of heat could actually reduce your battery life ! Have a look at his presentation - page 18 or 19 on the attached link - it's a good authoritative read on all things LIPO translated from German **LINK**

Nigel R21/11/2019 10:20:52
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3164 forum posts
486 photos

Ideal storage is sub 10 deg, I know, but they're not usable with rusty plugs.

i12fly21/11/2019 19:21:00
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577 forum posts
21 photos

A very interesting read Conrad.

For people who keep their Lipos at a storage charge value the temperature makes very little difference unless it goes over 25deg. (sheet 33). I keep mine near fully charged ready for use so it would benefit me to keep the temperature down a bit so I'll keep an eye on the ambient temperature more in future.

However I still want to keep them at a usable temperature, ready for action 15-20 deg? (sheet 142), so I guess I'll put up with a bit less life. I use 3S and 4S, they're not too expensive and I find last 2 to 5 years before puffing up unacceptably.

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