By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Do you love some of your engines so much you don't fly them?

I don't want some ham-fisted novice wrecking any of my Lasers!

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
David Davis15/01/2020 10:40:17
avatar
3535 forum posts
642 photos

Any of you feel the same way as I do about some of your engines? Over-protective perhaps?

Let me tell you a little story. I do a fair bit of instructing and have or had, two i/c trainers and an electric foamie with which to teach beginners. One of the i/c trainers is something called a Primary 40 an eminently forgetable ARTF trainer powered by an Irvine 40, the other was a Seagull Boomerang, my favourite ARTF trainer BTW, powered by an Enya 50. This is a lovely engine and fitted with the Q silencer it sounds lovely too! The problem with teaching beginners is that you go through about five stages before they are competent to fly on their own.

To begin with you are for ever taking back control on the buddy box as their turns become spiral dives!

The second stage occurs when they are not making so many mistakes but in a ten minute flight you may have to take back control three or four times.

By the time they reach the third stage they are capable of flying basic circuits and horizontal eights but sometimes get into trouble so you have to take back control.

The fourth stage is the most dangerous stage. They can usually fly for ten minutes and when they make a mistake they are usually capable of correcting the mistake themselves. I stress the word usually. What happened in my case was that my trainee made a mistake, I allowed him the time to correct it but he made a horlicks of the correction, I gave him a little more time, but before I could regain control the model had smashed itself into the ground. Fortunately the mighty, much-loved Enya seemed to be undamaged.

The fifth stage by the way, is when they have passed a nationally recognised certificate of competence such as the British A Certificate or the French Brevet A. You can kiss them good bye then. They can fly on their own!

Sooooooooo about six years ago the wing departed from my Telemaster 40. The fuselage turned itself into a lawn dart and was only any good for firewood! crying For Christmas I treated myself to a pair of floats. They turned out to be too small for my Senior Telemaster so I decided to build another Telemaster 40, as I still have some structurally sound wings and I plan to build it so that it may be flown from either floats or wheels and it be used in training mode as a replacement for the Boomerang.

I have a number of unemployed fourstrokes including three Laser 70s, sleeping in their boxes. Initially I thought of fitting one of those to the T40 but then I thought that if I had a repetition of the Boomerang event, one of my beloved Lasers could be wrecked!

A few years ago I bought an Enya 45 and two OS 40s at a swap meet for 5€ (£4.28 Sterling or $5.57 US). I decided to fit one of those to the Telemaster 40 and managed to get two of them going on the test stand earlier this morning. They ran very well but they require a strap on silencer. I fitted a BCM silencer but it didn't and oh the noise! sad

Doesn't anybody make a decent strap-on silencer anymore? frown

Robin Colbourne15/01/2020 11:32:12
avatar
473 forum posts
6 photos

On a trip to the USA in 1988, I bought an OS20FS from America's Hobby Center in New York. I used it for several years to power a secondhand three channel Cambria Instructor 20 on which I have given many beginner's lessons, including take offs and landings. As I have just moved to a club with a tarmac runway, I think I might retire the engine and put in something with a bit less nostalgic value.

If you are prepared to accept the odd broken fin or some burnt on castor, there are still plenty of perfectly usable engines which can be picked up for under £30, leaving the 'family heirlooms' as you would wish to keep them.

Piers Bowlan15/01/2020 11:40:34
avatar
2005 forum posts
53 photos

I am surprised someone doesn't build a pusher, IC pod and boom trainer with a 40 sized engine, rather like an MPX EasyStar on steroids. The engine would not be first on the scene of the accident so no more broken props or cylinders. The wing could be banded on. The boom carbon fibre and the fuselage pod could be replaced easily if it was totalled. Just a thought. smile p

Edited By Piers Bowlan on 15/01/2020 11:41:42

Robin Colbourne15/01/2020 13:06:39
avatar
473 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by Piers Bowlan on 15/01/2020 11:40:34:

I am surprised someone doesn't build a pusher, IC pod and boom trainer with a 40 sized engine, rather like an MPX EasyStar on steroids. The engine would not be first on the scene of the accident so no more broken props or cylinders. The wing could be banded on. The boom carbon fibre and the fuselage pod could be replaced easily if it was totalled. Just a thought. smile p

Edited By Piers Bowlan on 15/01/2020 11:41:42

A good point Piers, the main reasons that I can see would be the amount of weight getting it to balance and difficulty of starting it without an electric starter. Probably easy enough once you have the knack, but we're talking about a beginner's model here.

The other thing is it would need to be pretty stiff, as the tails on this layout tend to flap around a quite a bit on a slenderish boom, with the tail surfaces vibrating from the engine and the propwash. It is an excellent layout for an electric trainer, hence the reason there are so many like this.

Nigel R15/01/2020 13:18:14
avatar
3407 forum posts
524 photos

A bit of weight of history here, I suspect, in the dim and distant past when everyone had to build their trainer, nothing was easier to build than a box with a foam wing.

Don Fry15/01/2020 13:40:01
avatar
4413 forum posts
52 photos

I once had an IC powered pusher. I found out, that the prop on a pusher, pulls errant fingers into the disc, if adjusting a needle, rather than buzzing them out of the arc, as happens with a tractor prop.

I am now frightened of them. Not for beginners. David forgot the sixth stage, where a beginner learns why you are careful round the prop.

Back to post, what is your hole spacing David, or is a strap on necessary because a manufactures silence won't fit the airframe.

edit, senile, forgot the point of the post. What happens to the motor when you fall off the perch, start reading the instructions for stall speeds of these wings you've been issued with.

Edited By Don Fry on 15/01/2020 13:43:38

Brian Cooper15/01/2020 13:46:07
avatar
479 forum posts
20 photos

Yes. . . I have an engine which I keep as a "treasure". . It is, however, a most unlikely treasure as it is just a humble Merco .49 with a twin plug head.

The engine has no real intrinsic value, and it isn't even that pretty BUT it is treasured is because I bought it new (about 54 years ago) when I was 12 years old, and it is a shiny artifact from my childhood. . . It took ages to save up my pocket money for it, plus, it was my first "big" engine.. lol. . . There are a lot of happy memories in that old engine. thumbs up

B.C.

David Davis15/01/2020 13:53:48
avatar
3535 forum posts
642 photos
Posted by Don Fry on 15/01/2020 13:40:01:

... Back to post, what is your hole spacing David, or is a strap on necessary because a manufactures silence won't fit the airframe.

edit, senile, forgot the point of the post. What happens to the motor when you fall off the perch, start reading the instructions for stall speeds of these wings you've been issued with.

Edited By Don Fry on 15/01/2020 13:43:38

Don, the OS 40SR and the Enya are early engines with threaded holes for the silencer each side of the exhaust port. On the OS the part of the exhaust port, towards the back of the engine, has broken away. On the Enya the silencer mounting bolts have sheared off in their holes. Hence the need for a strap-on silencer.

The other OS is an as new rear exhaust engine which is intended for a Peter Russell 363.

Piers Bowlan15/01/2020 13:54:44
avatar
2005 forum posts
53 photos
Posted by Nigel R on 15/01/2020 13:18:14:

A bit of weight of history here, I suspect, in the dim and distant past when everyone had to build their trainer, nothing was easier to build than a box with a foam wing.

 

Good point Nigel.

I agree Robin, a lot easier to balance a leccy model with a load of lithium sitting in the nose. I have a 25mm carbon fiber tube that is pretty stiff but fixing the tail surfaces to it securely would be a challenge I agree. I also take Don's point about pushers being unforgiving of unwary fingers!

Yes, back to topic...

Edited By Piers Bowlan on 15/01/2020 14:28:39

David Davis15/01/2020 13:59:19
avatar
3535 forum posts
642 photos
Posted by Brian Cooper on 15/01/2020 13:46:07:

Yes. . . I have an engine which I keep as a "treasure". . It is, however, a most unlikely treasure as it is just a humble Merco .49 with a twin plug head.

The engine has no real intrinsic value, and it isn't even that pretty BUT it is treasured is because I bought it new (about 54 years ago) when I was 12 years old, and it is a shiny artifact from my childhood. . . It took ages to save up my pocket money for it, plus, it was my first "big" engine.. lol. . . There are a lot of happy memories in that old engine. thumbs up

B.C.

Funny that Brian, I bought an Enya 35 of eBay for a few quid last year. It was in its original box with both cylinder heads and all of the paper work. It had been mounted in an airframe, marks on the lugs, but never run. This engine also has no monetary value but I can't see me starting it, flying it or selling it! Something else for the significant others to deal with when I drop off the perch!

Nigel R15/01/2020 14:36:02
avatar
3407 forum posts
524 photos

Brian, I have a magnum gp 25 kept for the same reason.

But I sold the pristine 61rf pumper when I was about 20. Curse the foolishness of youth.

J D 815/01/2020 14:54:06
avatar
1358 forum posts
78 photos

I have noticed that a good solid wood or glass fibre cowl [ not abs ] will often give the engine some protection in a whoopsy limiting the damage.

Don Fry15/01/2020 16:16:13
avatar
4413 forum posts
52 photos

And a Laser, of which David has three suitable, is a difficult lump to damage.

Stuphedd15/01/2020 16:59:25
677 forum posts
355 photos

My motor is a Mills 2.4 which my dad gave me sometime in the 50s.

It would start with just a gentle flick and lived permanently on the end of the work bench , all bolted down ready to go , Then in the 60s I swapped it for a Seagull outboard motor in need of some TLC to a collector,

This collector passed away a few years back and his son finding a note in the Mills box relating to its passed history got in touch and very generously gave it back to me ,

I shall give it to my son who has no interest in boats , but loves and flies diesels ! So it may fly ??

cheers

Paul Marsh15/01/2020 17:49:12
avatar
3816 forum posts
1102 photos

I love my engines, even the standard .40. This engine I bought, not used yet, but it's nice to keep, although have 3 other mk1 60's but not the machined head like this one.

os60fsmk1 (2).jpg

Peter Miller15/01/2020 18:38:34
avatar
10529 forum posts
1246 photos
10 articles

I have seen so many accidents with propellers in unusual.positions. One needed 11 stitches to put a finger together so now I refuse to have anything to do with engine that are not right out in front of the rest of the model.

On engines. I love engines but if they are not used they are just paper weights. A major part of engines is how they run, what they sound like, how the handle.

Just recently I almost bought a Dooling 29. I remember the growl after starting turining into the high pitched yowl as it is leaned out.

But I knew that running it at home would be out of the question and running it on the field would not have been popular so I didn't buy it.

Don Fry15/01/2020 18:48:12
avatar
4413 forum posts
52 photos
Posted by Don Fry on 15/01/2020 16:16:13:

And a Laser, of which David has three suitable, is a difficult lump to damage.

No question of envy mind.

Andy4816/01/2020 22:43:25
1414 forum posts
5 photos

A little off topic, but the OP's story raises a few interesting issues.

1. By the time students have got to the confidence stage of take offs and landings surely they should have their own plane and one buddy boxes to that.

2. I don't have any sentimentality about my electric motors seeing as they are as cheap as chips.

3. I love the quick take back system I have on my Frsky gear where I regain control instantly simply by moving the joystick. It is that difficult time where you just give them that extra fraction of a second to self correct that this works best.

Steve Adams17/01/2020 00:46:28
194 forum posts

I have brand new in boxes with receipts MDS 38 and Irvine 25 Mk 3 abc never run engines. Have a MDS 25 in my old RCM&E Rag Tag and a Enya 40 in my late friend's own designed Bobcat(like a bigger Precedent Fun Fly only slightly bigger and designed before Fun Fly!)

Steve laugh

alex nicol17/01/2020 09:35:14
avatar
339 forum posts
15 photos

I'm firmly in the enjoyment through use camp. All ic ( glow and petrol). The only engines I'd admit to a little sentimental attachment are from my control line days in the early 70's namely a Super Tigre G20/15 and a Rossi 15 diesel. Unfortunately both are way past their prime ( completely clapped out ) and will never power anything again but I just couldn't bring myself to dispose of them and they reside in the bench drawer wrapped in an oily rag.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E! 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
CADMA
Slec
Cambridge Gliding Club
CML
Sussex Model Centre
Wings & Wheels 2019
electricwingman 2017
Advertise With Us
Sarik
Do you use a throttle kill switch?
Q: This refers to electric-powered models but do you use a throttle kill switch?

 Yes
 No
 Sometimes
 Rarely

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us