By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by CML

Aileron set up

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Taff01/01/2009 19:48:00
avatar
45 forum posts
9 photos

Hi All

Need some advice please

Could someone put me on the right path , i have nearly completed my first trainer ,Sebart Shark 30 E and iam upto the stage of puting in the electrics..all installed ok ie..motor .esc.receiver ,but as to linking the ailerons no instructions....being 2 off aileron servos  i am in a bit of a newbe situation (or thicky) lol   reading the forums have picked a bit of info but would like it to be clarified please...could i use channel 1 & 6 (or have i missunderstood) or do use a Y connector ? if both are a possability could someone tell me which is best and why ...sorry if it is a mundane question but its confusing for me.

Thanks in advance

Taff

Hamish01/01/2009 19:53:00
642 forum posts
47 photos

I use 1 and 6.  It means you can fine tune the trim to each aileron, at least on my transmitter.

What radio gear are you using?

Taff01/01/2009 20:08:00
avatar
45 forum posts
9 photos

Hi Hamish

Going to be using Futaba T6ex 2.4GHz  what you think

Andy Harris01/01/2009 20:13:00
avatar
464 forum posts
30 photos

Glynn

Individual outputs, don't use the Y.

 Please let us know how the Shark flie!

Cheers Andy

Frank Skilbeck01/01/2009 20:44:00
avatar
4735 forum posts
101 photos

Glynn - read the Futaba manual it will tell you how to set up the individual wing servo's. Much better than a Y lead as you can trim them independantly and also set up aileron differential or flapperons etc if required, not really required on thos plane but it will be useful to go through it anyway..

 Kit instructions won't tell you how to do this as each radio is slightly different.

Simon Chaddock01/01/2009 21:52:00
avatar
5717 forum posts
3034 photos

Glynn

Yes using 2 channels is better but do make sure you fully understand how to set this up on your radio and how to adjust it properly. A Y lead is simpler as far as the radio set up is concerned but requires more care adjusting the servo to aileron linkage correctly.

When you set up the ailerons make sure both are exactly in line with the wing trailing edge when the stick in the centre. If they are down even just a little bit it will make the plane harder to handle.

Peter Miller02/01/2009 08:23:00
avatar
11107 forum posts
1309 photos
10 articles

I would say that as a novice you would be better off using the Y lead. I normally do.

Using two channels is useful but you have enough complications without worrying about setting that up. Even I get confused with trying to set up ailerons on two separate channels.

I have to sit there with the book and it takes me quite some time to get it right.

Myron Beaumont02/01/2009 08:43:00
avatar
5797 forum posts
51 photos

Peter

I draw comfort knowing I'm not the only one .I,like you it seems ,can go over & over the destructions & it wont seem to connect with the right part of my brain cell .     'er indoors has no problems.  Trouble is she;s not always available .I've had all sorts of weird things happen when using 1 & 6  .It looks so simple when she does it  and of course the more I try the more annoyed I get with myself for being such a dumbo .Mind you - give her some wood and its her no-go area

Bruce Richards02/01/2009 09:19:00
avatar
1849 forum posts
I must agree with Peter. On a trainer and as a novice it is best to keep it simple and use a Y lead on channel 1.
Frank Skilbeck02/01/2009 18:42:00
avatar
4735 forum posts
101 photos

Luddites - did you buy a video recorder and wait until the program was on the start recording manually.

Some good assistance on Futaba radio programming here 

http://www.futaba-rc.com/faq/faq-6exa.html

If you can use the programming to set travel and exponential then separate servo's on the ailerons are the best way to go. By adjusting the end points you can dial in some differential if you need it.

Peter Miller02/01/2009 18:55:00
avatar
11107 forum posts
1309 photos
10 articles

Frank.

Here is a chap who is a novice. Having seen a lot of novices,  I know that they have enough trouble setting up the standard model.

He doesn't need differential on a basic trainer. He doesn't need any more to worry about. That way lies trouble.

Most accidents are caused by a series of different little problems. Eliminate as many little unnecessary propblems as possible and you reduce the chance of things going wrong.

Now I know it looks great to show how clever one is but not when it causes  more trouble thanit is worth.

I work on the KISS principle , in other words, KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID!

Hamish02/01/2009 20:13:00
642 forum posts
47 photos

I am a novice and found that simple adjusting in the control panel was a lot easier and more accurate than fiddling about with clips and small screws.

It takes all types with different preferences and whichever suits your abilities is  the avenue you should follow.

I do find that you can get a pile of conflicting advise from individuals who appear to have miles of experience.  I have found trial and error an avenue that has suited me.  

Frank Skilbeck02/01/2009 21:25:00
avatar
4735 forum posts
101 photos

Peter, is was slightly tongue in cheek, but if you are familiar with computerised gadgets then setting up a Tx with separate aileron servo's will be fairly intuitive.

I started with red and black servo's so that shows my age!

But people brough up on modern electronics don't find this an issue, I remember teaching one young lad to fly and as he cleared the end of the strip on landing his engine cut. I said lucky your engine cut just as you were about to land, oh no he says I pushed the engine kill button....

But I know what you mean, I've seen people with all singing and dancing sets and all they do is use the servo reverse and end point adjustment.

Eric Bray02/01/2009 21:54:00
avatar
6600 forum posts
2 photos

If you ignore all the fancy gizmo's, and learn how to set up all your models so they are in trim, to start with, avoiding using the memories, reversers, and mixers, you stand a fair chance of flying without making silly mistakes like having back-to-front controls or wildly out of wack trims.

Keep the all-singing-all-dancing stuff until you have learned the basics.

Andy Harris02/01/2009 22:07:00
avatar
464 forum posts
30 photos

Frank is right.

TX setup is much easier than Y leads and getting both sides mechanically right, and then ensuring full throw doesn't damage anything.

TX setup is straightforward and documented.

And then you have the benfit of dual rates and exponential to make flight more predictable and tractable for the novice.

Andy

Peter Miller03/01/2009 09:01:00
avatar
11107 forum posts
1309 photos
10 articles

Hey folks, lets really get into this. Tell Taff that for perfect control he should also set up coupled aileron and rudder, then he can mix in  a bit of rudder tirm as he opens the throttle and possibly a bit of elevtaor trim as well, After all, that is much easier than adjusting thrust lines which are never quite right on ARTFs.

 Seriously. Taff can use the end point adjustment to set up his ailerons on a Y lead which avoids  fiddling with clips and screws and damage that some people seem to think would occur but avoids the complications if using two separate cahnnels.

I find it interesting that people can say such things, We used to have to set up things mechanically every time. Now any errors are corrected on the transmitter and never mind at what angle the servo output arm ends up. Not in fact the best way to do things from the point of view of control geometry.

Oh, and my first radio was ECC Telecommander. (Who goes back THAT far?) Never did get it to work successefully in flight. My first successful radio was RCS Guidance system.

Red and black servos? That was really modern advanced stuff. You should have watched people struggling to set up reed gear.

Stephen Grigg03/01/2009 09:15:00
avatar
8691 forum posts
1128 photos
IM a novice,I use a Y lead and my instructor helps me set and trim the model.I use a Spectrum and its very complicated for me.
Taff04/01/2009 15:34:00
avatar
45 forum posts
9 photos

Hi

Thanks to all for advice,had a good read of the Futaba manual (not that bad )think I will try 1 & 6,got to try,if Ihit trouble then I will revert to Y lead.

Cheers for now  Taff 

PS

Could not believe the swift response & good advice...what a briliant place to get all your answers....keep up the good work you people

Eric Bray04/01/2009 22:49:00
avatar
6600 forum posts
2 photos
For every question - you will get a dozen different answers!
P J Hearne06/01/2009 13:12:00
avatar
1 forum posts
6 photos

  I am setting up my new Futaba T7C Spectrum 2.4 Ghz Transmitter with a Multiplex Twinstar II. Have fitted a  Y lead for the Twin Ailerons and was wondering about the 1 & 6 channel option

  The Twinstar Manual reccomends 18mm up and 10mm down (appx) for the Ailerons so I think I will set them both at 14mm with the Y lead for now as am a novice

  Does this sound acceptable Guys?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
electricwingman 2017
Sussex Model Centre
CML
Slec
Advertise With Us
Sarik
Latest "For Sale" Ads
Has home isolation prompted you to start trad' building?
Q: The effects of Coronavirus

 Yes - for the first time
 Yes - but Ive bashed balsa before
 No - Ive existing projects on the bench
 No - Im strictly an ARTF person

Latest Reviews
Digital Back Issues

RCM&E Digital Back Issues

Contact us

Contact us

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of RCM&E? Use our magazine locator link to find your nearest stockist!

Find RCM&E!