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New boiler installation

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fly boy305/05/2020 08:24:58
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3688 forum posts
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Hi all, three months ago I had new boiler installed. Plumber put some stuff into the installation, and was due to remove it and flush system in a months time. Since Covic19 arrived he is in self isolation and I cannot get hold of him. Is this stuff swirling round in my system ok for a good while, or should it be removed sooner or later. Cheers

Steve Hargreaves - Moderator05/05/2020 08:42:41
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6765 forum posts
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Do you know what the "stuff" is FB3? Has he left a carton or a bottle?

J D 805/05/2020 08:51:53
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Should not be a problem in the short term.

The flush is there to clean out the system of any flux that may remain after installation or if boiler is fitted to an old heating system it is to clear out the black sludge [ iron oxide ] that forms over time in any central heating system and so improve boiler performance/life.

The system is then refilled with a preservative a bit like the coolant in a car.

flight105/05/2020 09:33:18
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Find out what cleaner your plumber has used, because some are stronger than others and have maximum time allowed before it must be flushed out. read the manufactures instructions and go by that . 3 months is far to long in my experience, get it power flushed and refilled with fresh central heating inhibitor/protector

Martian05/05/2020 10:18:52
2540 forum posts
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Hi fb3 can,t you ask the plumber if you should be concerned

Wingman05/05/2020 10:35:15
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As an aside, I've tried all those Fernox type cleaners and preservatives but the best by far is ethylene glycol car antifreeze (Bluecol etc.) dozed at 1 litre per radiator (regardless of radiator size). Car antifreeze is good for much higher temperatures than a central heating system can get to and is good for steel, iron, aluminium, copper, brass and magnesium so any metal in a central heating system won't react with it. I find that after 2 years the water is still clear and I now leave it for 5 years before draining and refilling. My system, including the boiler, is 25 years old, one of the radiators and the hot water tank are original and the system is still silent in operation (and it's an 'open system).

Steve Hargreaves - Moderator05/05/2020 10:53:17
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That's an interesting thought Wingman.....such things are very much on my mind at the moment as I'm just about to do some work on my CH system (fit two new radiators) so I'm about to drain & refill my system. I've always used Sentinel products (X100 inhibitor) & this is used in a much lower concentration. Their recommendation is 1L of inhibitor to dose a typical system of up to 10 radiators.

My caravan has an Alde wet CH system & that uses car antifreeze (VW G13+ spec if you are interested) but I guess freezing is much more of an issue with caravans than the system in your house.

As I understand it the reason for the use of inhibitor is to reduce the reaction between the different metals used. A typical home CH system will have steel radiators, a cast iron heat exchanger (in older boilers...copper or stainless steel in newer boilers) & of course copper/brass in the pipework so quite a mixture & probably quite different to that found in a typical engine (not much copper in these...wink 2)

fly boy305/05/2020 11:02:02
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3688 forum posts
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Thanks for replies lads. Do not know what he put in the system, but he did mention that he had fitted a magnetic filter Adey ? Will try to get hold of him on mobile to show my concern. Are plumbers working at all due to the lock down ? Cheers

J D 805/05/2020 11:17:01
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1522 forum posts
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Just reread the op and yes it is time the stuff was out. My system is 55 years old with mostly original radiators and pipe work. I think having soft water from a well and a change every 5 years with new inhibitor has helped.

kc05/05/2020 11:28:09
6568 forum posts
173 photos

You should check the details of the boilers guarantee which may state what should be done. Make certain it is done as the guaranttee lasts many years but requires annual service ( cleaning magnetic filter etc) Details were on the boiler makers website when I checked the various makes before choosing.

My recent experience of having the boiler replaced was that the heating engineer flushed the system with some special stuff and used a magnetic filter in addition to the magnetic filter he fitted. He showed me the huge amount of gunge his filter removed. However the flushing took only an hour two. Then refilled with Fermox or something.

fly boy305/05/2020 14:16:25
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3688 forum posts
22 photos

Thanks lads, managed to locate the plumber, and state my concerns. He agreed should be removed 3to4 months after installation. He will sort it next week. Needless to say I will be out in the garden lol You can never be too carefull. Cheers

Edited By fly boy3 on 05/05/2020 14:18:09

Stephen Smith 1405/05/2020 22:20:45
226 forum posts
Posted by Wingman on 05/05/2020 10:35:15:

As an aside, I've tried all those Fernox type cleaners and preservatives but the best by far is ethylene glycol car antifreeze (Bluecol etc.) dozed at 1 litre per radiator (regardless of radiator size). Car antifreeze is good for much higher temperatures than a central heating system can get to and is good for steel, iron, aluminium, copper, brass and magnesium so any metal in a central heating system won't react with it. I find that after 2 years the water is still clear and I now leave it for 5 years before draining and refilling. My system, including the boiler, is 25 years old, one of the radiators and the hot water tank are original and the system is still silent in operation (and it's an 'open system).

Some of what you say is incorrect blue antifreeze losses its ability to prevent corrosion quickly this is why it's changed every 2 years it will quickly start to degrade aluminium, red antifreeze corrodes iron and steel, modern cast iron engine blocks are coated internally, but red won't attack aluminium, it also has a longer service life of 5 years.

I'm not a plumber but do understand what automotive antifreeze does what and when it should be used 5 years seems a little risky to leave it in for and as central heating specific antifreeze is available I would always recommend using that instead of one not specific to requirements

i12fly05/05/2020 23:02:31
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634 forum posts
22 photos

The cleanser should have been removed after a few days running. After a few months the risk is that the debris can deposit out again, usually in the boiler heat exchanger due to decreasing solubility of the oxide with increased temperature. However if your boiler is quiet in operation then you have got away with it. If it sings/kettles when heating up it will need to be repeated properly. I was involved in an exercise with both Sentinel and Fernox Chief Chemists some years ago which demonstrated this.

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