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Seeking knowledge

DeHaviland Dh2 glider

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OZ e flyer24/05/2020 02:10:38
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152 forum posts
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Hi everyone. I’m seeking any knowledge I can find on a glider that was made fleetingly for the Aussie airforce during wwII.
I know very little about the DH2 other than it was designed and manufactured in Australia by Dehaviland.

The Australian airforce (RAAF) is celebrating its 100th anniversary next year and there are people looking for information on this glider far and wide as it seems there is very little info on it.

Any help would greatly appreciated.

Shane

MattyB24/05/2020 03:34:04
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2073 forum posts
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Can’t find anything about a De Havilland DH2, do you mean the DHA-G2?


 

Edited By MattyB on 24/05/2020 03:35:26

OZ e flyer24/05/2020 09:39:56
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Yep I think that’s the one. I believe it had an experimental suction airfoil wing design though.

Denis Watkins24/05/2020 11:15:17
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113 photos

There is mention here of the " suction " at number 52, another model of the DHA G2

dha2-2 (1).jpg

Edited By Denis Watkins on 24/05/2020 11:46:46

OZ e flyer24/05/2020 16:01:11
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152 forum posts
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Many thanks guys. I’ve been able to find a little more info now. Very short lived machine. 8 made only but it was 1952 when the project finished.

A most curious design that “suction wing”. It appears there was a suction fan in it as well and when operating (suction on) it appears the stall speed was slower. Amazing stuff. Couple more photos below if you’re interested.

thanks again for your help.

Shane

eflightray24/05/2020 18:55:35
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622 forum posts
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Number 28 -- Ford Mercury V8 engine ?

Perhaps they should have used the engine for propulsion.

.

Frank Skilbeck24/05/2020 19:50:56
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Posted by eflightray on 24/05/2020 18:55:35:

Number 28 -- Ford Mercury V8 engine ?

Perhaps they should have used the engine for propulsion.

.

As the link above notes only one glider was converted this way to test the suction wing. The gliders were never used in service.

MattyB24/05/2020 22:12:44
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2073 forum posts
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Posted by eflightray on 24/05/2020 18:55:35:

Number 28 -- Ford Mercury V8 engine ?

Perhaps they should have used the engine for propulsion.

I know, what were they thinking carrying around that additional weight in order create a device to fractionally reduce the stall speed?!! Errr.... 😂

Edited By MattyB on 24/05/2020 22:13:03

Richard Clark 225/05/2020 10:08:47
292 forum posts
Posted by MattyB on 24/05/2020 22:12:44:
Posted by eflightray on 24/05/2020 18:55:35:

Number 28 -- Ford Mercury V8 engine ?

Perhaps they should have used the engine for propulsion.

I know, what were they thinking carrying around that additional weight in order create a device to fractionally reduce the stall speed?!! Errr.... 😂

Edited By MattyB on 24/05/2020 22:13:03

The whole thing's barmy.

The one in the cutaway is  an observation aircraft, pilot, observer, and some cameras. What use is an 'glider' observation aircraft that has to be towed to the desired location? And it's the enemy you observe, not your own side. So the plane, the crew, and the film, will fall into enemy hands every time. The people who sent it won't ever get to see the pictures they wanted taken   so what's the point?

And as for that cast iron mooring block of an engine, even with the suction on the stalling speed is higher than the Victa Airtourer me and a mate used to own. Leave that heavy weight out and the stalling speed would probably be less than the stalling speed with all that junk running anyway.

Nuts

Edited By Richard Clark 2 on 25/05/2020 10:12:21

Edited By Richard Clark 2 on 25/05/2020 10:21:35

Edited By Richard Clark 2 on 25/05/2020 10:23:43

Denis Watkins25/05/2020 10:56:54
4450 forum posts
113 photos

The idea was that the low pressure created at the trailing edge,

Forced air to pass over the main wing, making this a very slow flying camera platform.

Able to loiter over a target

I think we can be pretty sure that this didn't work so well

OZ e flyer26/05/2020 02:30:42
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152 forum posts
28 photos

I have to admit it was certainly a pretty strange idea.

What started as a cargo carrying glider becomes a spy glider. Strange. I guess they were trying to achieve something for a reason.

The aussie airforce was and I guess still is, very small so bang for buck becomes vital and innovation can sometimes provide that cutting edge advantage......not always though. Lol.

OZ e flyer26/05/2020 03:49:18
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152 forum posts
28 photos

dha-g2 a.jpg

OZ e flyer26/05/2020 03:51:45
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152 forum posts
28 photos

Was the use of gliders ever really successful from a military perspective?

I know they are using drones now that are almost gliders but I'm curious as to how effective they were during conflicts.

Frank Skilbeck26/05/2020 07:44:00
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4734 forum posts
101 photos

I think we are misinterpreting the suction aerofoil, there was only one glider fitted out and this was to investigate this. It was a research aircraft it was never the intent to fit this as standard to the gliders, it just happened to be a spare aircraft which could be repurposed to test this. Quite common to use existing aircraft to test new ideas.

Simon Chaddock26/05/2020 08:09:11
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5717 forum posts
3034 photos

The principle of sucking the turbulent air to promote laminar flow has be known for some time with various experiment performed in both the UK and even more so in the US.

In theory the power required to do this is relatively small and the benefit great but the practicality of doing so has proved to be difficult.

Probably the most extreme being the two Northrop X-21A (a highly modified Douglas WB 66D) which proved the concept worked giving improved range but the maintenance requirements (the highly polished wing surface had to be kept spotlessly clean) proved impractical for service use.

OZ e flyer

I think if you research the use of gliders in WWII they proved to be effective in specific circumstances by providing the ability to land a concentration of fully equipped troops in a small area. A role that is now taken over by helicopters.

Nigel R26/05/2020 08:41:00
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3922 forum posts
685 photos

The whole suction wing thing sort of evolved into the blown flap, as per Buccaneer and Mig 21 amongst others:

**LINK**

"Was the use of gliders ever really successful from a military perspective?"

"Man carrying kites" middle ages thru early 1900

**LINK**

Troop drops, WW2

**LINK**

Can't think of many others to be fair.

Does the U2 almost count as a glider?

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