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Is there a list of frequencies we can use in the UK?

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Steve J28/05/2020 08:16:01
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1907 forum posts
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Posted by Phil Green on 27/05/2020 19:40:35:

The uk version has exactly the same quote:

I know. I referred to it in my 19:31 post.

Anyway, as you don't seem to be able to understand the phrase 'in addition', there is very little point discussing this with you so I'm going to say goodbye.

Phil Green28/05/2020 10:32:52
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Posted by Steve J on 28/05/2020 08:16:01:
Posted by Phil Green on 27/05/2020 19:40:35:

The uk version has exactly the same quote:

I know. I referred to it in my 19:31 post.

Anyway, as you don't seem to be able to understand the phrase 'in addition', there is very little point discussing this with you so I'm going to say goodbye.

Wow. Chill Steve smiley

all I'm saying is that if it is a legit R/C band then its not specifically documented as such like all the other R/C bands are.

Edited By Phil Green on 28/05/2020 15:06:12

Dickw28/05/2020 12:32:51
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720 forum posts
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So, in summary :-

868/915 is a legal frequency in Eu/FCC areas respectively if the technology is done right - but perhaps not for model control.

The Jeti system uses the 900 frequency only as a backup in case the 2.4 is wiped out (e.g. illegal 2.4 booster nearby).

So the Jeti 900 is not used for model control (and therefore legal) unless the 2.4 is swamped, and even in that case it remains legal as long as you don't move the sticks (i.e. try to control the model).

The pilot then has a decision to make - does he land the model safely, but perhaps illegally, using the 900, or does he remain legal and leave it to crash somewhere?

devil sorry - couldn't resist the temptation.

Dick

Phil Green28/05/2020 13:07:03
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1598 forum posts
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I've asked Ofcom for clarification, the initial conversation suggests that the documentation is far from up to date and that spectrum control has gone to pot... and that the UKRCC isnt properly supported by Ofcom. Maybe Jeti themselves could give a document reference. I cant imagine a company like Jeti getting it wrong.

Peter Christy28/05/2020 14:04:55
1820 forum posts

Does the UKRCC still exist? I used to be on it, but haven't heard from them in years!

Back when I attended meetings, Ofcom always had a representative there. A very helpful and knowledgeable chap he was, too!

--

Pete

Andy Stephenson28/05/2020 14:16:06
169 forum posts
28 photos

I just searched for the UKRCC and it takes me straight to the BMFA website with no explanation. I guess that says it all.

A.

Frank Skilbeck28/05/2020 14:53:57
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Posted by Dickw on 28/05/2020 12:32:51:

So, in summary :-

868/915 is a legal frequency in Eu/FCC areas respectively if the technology is done right - but perhaps not for model control.

The Jeti system uses the 900 frequency only as a backup in case the 2.4 is wiped out (e.g. illegal 2.4 booster nearby).

So the Jeti 900 is not used for model control (and therefore legal) unless the 2.4 is swamped, and even in that case it remains legal as long as you don't move the sticks (i.e. try to control the model).

The pilot then has a decision to make - does he land the model safely, but perhaps illegally, using the 900, or does he remain legal and leave it to crash somewhere?

devil sorry - couldn't resist the temptation.

Dick

From what I read 868 mhz can be used for control but it is a general frequency for controlling all sorts of devices. As I understand it normally the lower the frequency the greater the range, for the same power output, but data rates on lower frequencies are lower. So 35 mhz would have the greatest range but because of the data rates to wouldn't be practical to build a frequency hopping system.

Christopher Morris 229/05/2020 08:35:03
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185 forum posts
Posted by Trevor Crook on 28/05/2020 07:33:27:

Blimey, there was I thinking I'd given a simple answer to a simple question at the start of this thread. Should I have just responded "No"?!

Interesting that there is 20 something replies & still not a simple answer. surely a simple table with a shortlist of frequencies that you can & can't anymore use. But I think organisations like the government, Ofcom, & all the others don't live in the real world, & like to create as much paperwork as possible. I was lucky & retired at 50 because of the ridiculous amount of paperwork that was having to do in my trade created by similar organisations to the ones above & then having to explain to my customers why my prices had increased. Glad I live in the real world.

Denis Watkins29/05/2020 09:19:18
4448 forum posts
113 photos

My garage door works on 868 so don't fly when I go in and out.

Anything flying nearby on 868 must feel a conflict

Dickw29/05/2020 12:22:17
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720 forum posts
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Posted by Denis Watkins on 29/05/2020 09:19:18:

My garage door works on 868 so don't fly when I go in and out.

Anything flying nearby on 868 must feel a conflict

My WiFi works on 2.4, but my RC system in the same room still seems to work OK.

I do recall once not being able to unlock my car while a guy was unloading a nearby lorry with a remote control lifting arm!

We have to remember that we don't have exclusive use of these parts of the RF spectrum, so our systems have to cope with that - and the rules are inevitably complex to cater for all these options.

At least I don't have to worry about people taking the wrong peg any more yes

Dick

Richard Clark 229/05/2020 15:54:18
277 forum posts

At present in the UK if a piece of equipment has got CE marked on it it's fine to use no matter what's inside.

End of 'problem'.

Christopher Morris 229/05/2020 16:53:27
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185 forum posts
Posted by Richard Clark 2 on 29/05/2020 15:54:18:

At present in the UK if a piece of equipment has got CE marked on it it's fine to use no matter what's inside.

End of 'problem'.

Laugh! That means no more from China. Can't even get an item from there that has a UK plug or an adapter with a fuse. So you buy a simple 3amp item from China & you then back it up with the main 32amp fuse box fuse. "Very Dangerous" should be stopped.

Richard Clark 229/05/2020 17:41:35
277 forum posts
Posted by Christopher Morris 2 on 29/05/2020 16:53:27:
Posted by Richard Clark 2 on 29/05/2020 15:54:18:

At present in the UK if a piece of equipment has got CE marked on it it's fine to use no matter what's inside.

End of 'problem'.

Laugh! That means no more from China. Can't even get an item from there that has a UK plug or an adapter with a fuse. So you buy a simple 3amp item from China & you then back it up with the main 32amp fuse box fuse. "Very Dangerous" should be stopped.

CE marking is allowed to be 'self-certified' by the manufacturer so it doesn't mean much anyway. And my saying "fine" implies it will actually work in practice so I should have said "legally ok".

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