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Warbirds replicas Tempest

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Jonathan Sharland06/07/2020 18:52:04
34 forum posts

Graham,

Thanks for the info. I have not covered a model befor so this was useful.

A follow up question how are you planning on putting the panel lines in. I make a lot of 1/48 planes so can work an airbrush and would like to weather my model to look worn in....

Thanks again for the help.

Jon

Graham Davies 306/07/2020 20:59:11
71 forum posts
44 photos

Jon, I'm getting a bloke to do it! I'm no good with an airbrush, but I know a chap who is!

Graham

Ron Gray06/07/2020 21:58:47
2235 forum posts
978 photos

Weathering an airframe can be a very easy thing to do and doesn't need an airbrush! (although I do enjoy using mine). In fact for the finishing of my Warbirds replica LA-7 I decided to not use my air brushes and opted for simple rattle can acrylics for the base colours and cameo then used a combination of thin paint brushes, sponges and cloths plus a finger to achieve what I wanted. Give it a go, you maybe surprised at how good a finish you can get with the simple (and cheap) approach.

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Edited By Ron Gray on 06/07/2020 21:59:42

Graham Davies 306/07/2020 22:32:23
71 forum posts
44 photos

Looks great Ron.

I'm going to do the same regarding the base coats; acrylic rattle cans. If I didn't have a keen mate, I'd find a way but this is not an area of strength for me!

Ron Gray06/07/2020 23:03:42
2235 forum posts
978 photos

This is an area of warbird construction that puts a lot of people off because they think that it’s difficult to achieve a ‘decent’ finish. I’m just trying to say that it is not difficult and can be quite good fun! I’m not saying my LA-7 is brilliant, in fact it’s far from it but it’s what I wanted it to look like and, let’s face it, who can argue against it as nobody knows what the actual ‘planes looked like?

Jonathan Sharland07/07/2020 10:40:20
34 forum posts

Ron, I love the chipping and the faded paint on the wings very nice, It adds interest insead of being a flat toy like single colour.

What did you use to create the panel lines. On platic models they usually have them molded in or we make our own by engraving / scratching them in. Not so easy in balsa I would imagine.

Thanks

Jon

Denis Watkins07/07/2020 10:48:19
4544 forum posts
123 photos
Posted by Jonathan Sharland on 07/07/2020 10:40:20:

Ron, I love the chipping and the faded paint on the wings very nice, It adds interest insead of being a flat toy like single colour.

What did you use to create the panel lines. On platic models they usually have them molded in or we make our own by engraving / scratching them in. Not so easy in balsa I would imagine.

Thanks

Jon

Before your top coat Jon

Use a soft pencil, 4B, and a flexible ruler, and draw your lines in

They show through acrylic top coat especially if light in colour

Graham Davies 307/07/2020 20:52:37
71 forum posts
44 photos

I'd been watching the weather forecasts to find an evening to fly. This evening showed a nice gentle northerly, but also rather a lot of rain, so I went back in the garage!

Airframe is now doped and the first coats on. Light grey on the underside and a darker grey on the top. It's starting to look good now.

Regarding finishing; this is something I'm looking forward to a number of years learning the art. I am not looking for full scale; I want a sports model that looks like a real aeroplane so have realistic aspirations. If it looks good as it flies past, my work is done here. It already looks better than my Acrowot in the background! That one is 'naturally aged' by 20+ years in my loft, 10 in someone else's and having an old cold water tank dropped on it. It's a little known technique amongst the scale glitterati...

Graham

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Ron Gray07/07/2020 21:57:21
2235 forum posts
978 photos

@ Jon - Ah, the panel lines! I actually recreated the panels using self adhesive foil with a slight gap between them, I then accentuated the line using a very thin brush and black acrylic paint which I rubbed back before it dried, using my finger, along the line of the air flow! Yes you could paint or draw the lines on but the problem is that the lines wouldn't have any depth and would look a bit like most of the ARTFs you see! So, to create panel lines without panels use panel line tape (very narrow strips of masking tape) stick the tapes to the airframe then spray the primer over the whole lot. Follow that with a light rubbing down and remove the panel tape which should have now left a small narrow groove, your panel line now has depth!

I'm no expert at this weathering game but the above works for me!

Jonathan Sharland07/07/2020 22:02:48
34 forum posts

Graham,

Looking really good.

Denis, thanks for the hints on the panel lines. Its a great idea.

Jon

Kevin Wesley07/07/2020 23:26:10
avatar
49 forum posts
76 photos

I second the self adhesive foil system. You can rub through to create the effect of wear and tear. This model is covered in white printing paper to simulate panelsimg-20200517-wa0011.jpg

Kevin Wesley07/07/2020 23:26:41
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49 forum posts
76 photos

img-20200509-wa0009.jpg

Peter Miller08/07/2020 07:29:25
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11223 forum posts
1321 photos
10 articles

I would just like to comment on weathering.

DON'T over do it. Mechanics wear soft soled shoes so the wear is not as pronounced. When walking on wings it is normally on the main spar or marked walkways. NOT down near the trailing edge.

There may be some wear or paint off round screws on panels that are opened frequently.

THe biggest NO NO is to rub the paint off all the rivet heads so they are silver. In fact rivets tend to get a film of darker dirt round them. Many years ago there was a giant scale model which had every rivet painted silver,then camouflage and then the rivets rubbed back to silver OH DEAR!! The worst thing was that the full size aircraft skins were flush rivetted!!

My experience is from observation while working on RAF aircraft including Lancasters, Shackletons and a host of others.

Peter Miller08/07/2020 07:37:10
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11223 forum posts
1321 photos
10 articles

To clarify the last. When I said soft soled I meant normal leather shoes,or rubber soled cold weather boots but never,ever hobnailed boots.

Jon - Laser Engines08/07/2020 08:03:46
5562 forum posts
271 photos

I agree with Peter.

Leading edges, walkways, ammo hatches/panel edges etc might be stripped back to silver but usually any dimple or groove in the surface will accumulate dirt and go black.

This is a great close up example

A war weary Typhoon

Less is usually more...but not if your aircraft is Russian!

David Davis08/07/2020 09:02:31
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3785 forum posts
729 photos

The Russians used to paint their aircraft with white emulsion paint when the snows of winter arrived. It wore off by the following Spring! I believe that the Germans did something similar.

RICHARD WILLS08/07/2020 09:04:21
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533 forum posts
78 photos

All good points chaps . The main thing is have a go and morph toward what looks good for you . At the end of the day its important to please yourself and not feel judged , because that will just hold you back .

I like Jons picture of the Ruskies , Have a look at some of the really rough Jap stuff . Some of them must have been sprayed in the rain from 50 yds away and by the time the sun came out it simply flaked off . Most of them looked like large shiney fish with fin rot !

Have a go, thats the motto .

Peter Miller08/07/2020 10:01:45
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11223 forum posts
1321 photos
10 articles

There is one classic mistake made on B-17s.

Behind each engine on top of the wing there are four little vents.

Everyone paints black smoke trails coming out of these.

In fact the smoke trails come past BETWEEN the vents.A small but significant point.

Bob Cotsford08/07/2020 10:38:36
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8646 forum posts
483 photos

Posted by Peter Miller on 08/07/2020 07:29:25:

.....

There may be some wear or paint off round screws on panels that are opened frequently.

THe biggest NO NO is to rub the paint off all the rivet heads so they are silver. In fact rivets tend to get a film of darker dirt round them. Many years ago there was a giant scale model which had every rivet painted silver,then camouflage and then the rivets rubbed back to silver OH DEAR!! The worst thing was that the full size aircraft skins were flush rivetted!!

My experience is from observation while working on RAF aircraft including Lancasters, Shackletons and a host of others.

That reminds me of the Kyosho Ta152 that I bought second hand. The previous owner had painstakingly gone over the whole airframe dabbing silver paint on every single 'rivet' in the pre-printed covering. How I laughed washing it off with thinners face 16*

*thinking back the laughter may have been down to the effects of using the thinners in an enclosed area!

Edited By Bob Cotsford on 08/07/2020 10:40:59

Kevin Wesley08/07/2020 13:50:13
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49 forum posts
76 photos

Less is definately more, Unless its a Zero ! smiley A tip is to seal the finished model with an acrylic varnish, then if you over do it, you simply wash or rub it off. 20200331_221016.jpg

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