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Is this Power Supply Suitable?

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Ronaldo03/08/2020 10:41:08
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I use a 12v supply unit from a caravan/camping shop as a spare when needed. You plug them into a mains supply either on a camp site or at home to power 12v cooler boxes. You have to remove the cigarette lighter/socket end and put suitable plugs on to fit your charger.

Paul Marsh03/08/2020 11:00:19
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4088 forum posts
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Also, your house insurance might be invalid if you go the Heath Robinson route. Electrical goods have a IEE rating and if this catches or causes a fire, then your house insurance will find it easy not to pay out. The OP has realized that it is best to buy a charger, and can't think or a reason why anyone would even contemplate this!!! crook

Why?

Electrical Appliances

Standard Year Description
BS 1362 1973 Specification for general purpose fuse links for domestic and similar purposes (primarily for use in plugs)
BS 1363 Parts 1 -5 1995 - 2008 13 A plugs, socket-outlets and adaptors.
BS EN (IEC) 60309, Parts 1,2, 4 1999 - 2007 Plugs, socket-outlets and couplers for industrial purposes.
BS EN 60320, Parts 1, 2 1999 - 2009 Appliance couplers for household and similar general purposes.
BS EN 60335, Many parts   Specification for safety of household and similar electrical appliances

This happened nearby when a own build/modified battery charger caught fire, insurance never paid out, lost his home and imagine how much this would cost to rectify?£60,000, for the sake of £20? 

firehouse.jpg

Edited By Paul Marsh on 03/08/2020 11:07:07

Steve Balaam03/08/2020 11:08:05
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136 forum posts

You could maybe invest in a pre-built PSU from **LINK**

Doc Marten03/08/2020 11:30:35
710 forum posts
7 photos
Posted by Paul Marsh on 03/08/2020 11:00:19:

Also, your house insurance might be invalid if you go the Heath Robinson route. Electrical goods have a IEE rating and if this catches or causes a fire, then your house insurance will find it easy not to pay out. The OP has realized that it is best to buy a charger, and can't think or a reason why anyone would even contemplate this!!! crook

Why?

Electrical Appliances

Standard Year Description
BS 1362 1973 Specification for general purpose fuse links for domestic and similar purposes (primarily for use in plugs)
BS 1363 Parts 1 -5 1995 - 2008 13 A plugs, socket-outlets and adaptors.
BS EN (IEC) 60309, Parts 1,2, 4 1999 - 2007 Plugs, socket-outlets and couplers for industrial purposes.
BS EN 60320, Parts 1, 2 1999 - 2009 Appliance couplers for household and similar general purposes.
BS EN 60335, Many parts   Specification for safety of household and similar electrical appliances

This happened nearby when a own build/modified battery charger caught fire, insurance never paid out, lost his home and imagine how much this would cost to rectify?£60,000, for the sake of £20?

 

I take the standard and perpetually repeated precaution of never leaving a charging battery alone as everybody should.

I have no problem at all in recommending this as a better alternative to a ready made charger, these things are designed to run 365/24/7. You are in greater danger of a fire in the home using certain makes of white goods and leaving the TV on standby, this is a documented fact.

I'd be interested in a link to this incident.

 

Edited By Doc Marten on 03/08/2020 11:36:31

Martin Harris03/08/2020 11:52:16
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9497 forum posts
256 photos

I'd be interested in a link to the policy documents where this was excluded. Was this a "converted" server supply or a truly home brewed charger?  I've certainly never seen a clause mentioning BS ratings...

In my personal experience, I've seen smoke produced from commercially available hobby power supplies and battery chargers but (touching wood) never from a high end server supply, of which I've used a couple of versions over the past 10 years or so.

Do you know as a fact that the power supply actually caused the fire...or was it something after the output terminals? Most, if not all server supplies will sense an overload and shut down - and they have far higher rated protection circuitry than a hobby supply - a fire in a data centre could run into many millions - before claims for loss of service from end users...

Edited By Martin Harris on 03/08/2020 12:14:00

Nigel R03/08/2020 12:09:37
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4081 forum posts
694 photos

A bit late for the OP perhaps, but, for "just" a PSU, I have one of these:

HK Reaktor 350W

Will supply 15V at 23A.

Zero faff, works perfectly.

Steve J03/08/2020 12:14:41
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2051 forum posts
60 photos

Posted by Doc Marten on 03/08/2020 11:30:35:

I'd be interested in a link to this incident.

An image search comes up with a battery charger fire in Copford in '17, but I can't find anything about the insurance.

Craig Carr03/08/2020 13:36:10
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726 forum posts
518 photos
Jumped pinsConverted psuPosted by Geoff S on 03/08/2020 10:38:49:

+1 for a server power supply.

I've been using one for years after reading an article by PDR on the RCMF forum. They're very cheap (mine was less than £20 on eBay) and are capable of delivering a lot of current at 12v (IIRC mine is 24 amps). The are mains powered and have a standard Eurolead mains connector like (say) a PC. They just need a few links made on what would be the rack connecting pins and a simple means of connecting to your charger (I've attached brackets on the top with 4mm sockets). All the soldering is on the low voltage side so safe from electical shock injury (though be aware high current supplies can make things hot without blowing a fuse!).

The only disadvatage is their rather odd shape but, overall, they're not very big.

I believe they are replaced routinely as part of maintanence procedures as they're often in critical systems hence their availability s/h

Geoff

Plus one on the server route. Did mine a few year ago.... patmac on this forum brought an example to a club night and I made mine thereafter. Just a few pins to jump and jobs a good unyes

Doc Marten03/08/2020 14:36:36
710 forum posts
7 photos
Posted by Steve J on 03/08/2020 12:14:41:

Posted by Doc Marten on 03/08/2020 11:30:35:

I'd be interested in a link to this incident.

An image search comes up with a battery charger fire in Copford in '17, but I can't find anything about the insurance.

Thanks Steve,

Having searched this the only info out there is that it was started by a Lipo charger, nothing about homemade, nothing about RC packs, nothing about the PSU, nothing about invalid insurance advice from Essex Fire Service nor from any other fire UK fire service and nothing about the occupant losing their home! That is an empty garage which looks like it was actually being used for a car so possibly charging a drill or other DIY tool which would've been used with a dedicated, factory manufactured charger.

Misinformation is a powerful weapon.

Edited By Doc Marten on 03/08/2020 14:52:09

Steve J03/08/2020 14:48:04
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2051 forum posts
60 photos

Posted by Craig Carr on 03/08/2020 13:36:10:

Did mine a few year ago....

Nice collection of approvals on the side of that PSU and, as it's HP, they will all be valid .

Steve Balaam03/08/2020 17:26:46
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136 forum posts

I can attest to the dangers of unattended LiPo charging. A friend of mine who is sadly no longer with us was giving a Lipo that was still in the airplane a top up charge before flying. He was distracted by a telephone call when he returned to the garage the whole place was an inferno. He lost the house and everything in it. As far as I'm aware the rebuild and contents were covered by insurance. It couldn't be established what the exact cause but in all probability it had to be the battery, charger or PSU.

Mike T03/08/2020 17:41:50
553 forum posts
35 photos

I've done a couple of HP server PSU conversions. You can use the sockets from an old Futaba-style servo plug for shorting the PSU connector block pins. You can short another 2 pins to reduce the fan speed and short yet another 2 through a small variable pot to vary the voltage up to about 13.5V (gets a bit unstable after that. Well worth doing

Test Pilot03/08/2020 18:35:46
13 forum posts

I understand everyone is trying to help but shocked that as the OP said his electrical knowledge was close to zero he is still being encouraged to go the DIY route. All for the sake of what - £20 ?

If you have the knowledge and are comfortable adapting electrical equipment for your use, and can do so safely, great.

The OP, by his own admission doesn't, and encouraging him to do so is irresponsible and I'm frankly surprised some members of this excellent forum keep suggesting what for him could be a potentially dangerous solution.

TP

Paul Marsh03/08/2020 18:58:51
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4088 forum posts
1231 photos

I'm an electrican, or i did for many years and know how dangerous electricity is and worked on LV Switch-panels. Seen blown panels and switches, as well as a Power Factor Correction unit that caught fire. what a mess!

Paul Marsh03/08/2020 18:58:52
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4088 forum posts
1231 photos

I'm an electrican, or i did for many years and know how dangerous electricity is and worked on LV Switch-panels. Seen blown panels and switches, as well as a Power Factor Correction unit that caught fire. what a mess!

Doc Marten03/08/2020 19:11:57
710 forum posts
7 photos
Posted by Test Pilot on 03/08/2020 18:35:46:

I understand everyone is trying to help but shocked that as the OP said his electrical knowledge was close to zero he is still being encouraged to go the DIY route. All for the sake of what - £20 ?

If you have the knowledge and are comfortable adapting electrical equipment for your use, and can do so safely, great.

The OP, by his own admission doesn't, and encouraging him to do so is irresponsible and I'm frankly surprised some members of this excellent forum keep suggesting what for him could be a potentially dangerous solution.

TP

Can David solder? Yes

Can he read simple instructions capable of being understood by a 15 year old? Yes

Does he need to understand electronics? No

Is he capable of wiring a plug even after his confession of a lack of electrical expertise? Definitely.

Stop making out it's rocket science or too dangerous to even contemplate.....it's not.

Leave the Nanny state to people incapable of being able to make their own decisions and let the rest of us get on with our lives.

Jesus wept!

Edited By Doc Marten on 03/08/2020 19:25:20

David Davis03/08/2020 19:45:43
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3841 forum posts
741 photos

Gentlemen, gentlemen please! Thank you for all of your advice but the thread has moved on into areas which cause my eyes to start misting over!

I have already ordered the charger recommended by Paul Marsh and asked for it to be delivered to my partner's house. **LINK**

If I were put my mind to it, I daresay that I could wire up a PSU, I don't lack skill or intelligence, but neither am I short of £30. What I do lack is enthusiasm for electric flight generally. I understand its advantages, I use a foamie electric powered trainer with which I teach beginners, I am also building a double size Vic Smeed Tomboy which will be powered by an electric motor but I much prefer to spend my time with i/c enginers, noise, slime and all.

Having bought this charger which may be powered either from the mains or from a 12 Volt source I will have my own PSU and charger here at my home in France and another charger at my partner's house in Somerset. I did not want to lumber her with the potential mess of glow fuel after all she lives in rented accomodation. She is keen to learn how to build and how to fly. She's already a whizz on the simulator and we plan to build a Ben Buckle Keil Kraft Super 60 together.

Paul Marsh03/08/2020 20:34:42
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4088 forum posts
1231 photos

Thread is closed.yes

Doc Marten03/08/2020 21:30:43
710 forum posts
7 photos

Is it?

Edited By Doc Marten on 03/08/2020 21:31:09

Richard Clark 203/08/2020 21:55:03
426 forum posts
Posted by Test Pilot on 03/08/2020 18:35:46:

I understand everyone is trying to help but shocked that as the OP said his electrical knowledge was close to zero he is still being encouraged to go the DIY route. All for the sake of what - £20 ?

If you have the knowledge and are comfortable adapting electrical equipment for your use, and can do so safely, great.

The OP, by his own admission doesn't, and encouraging him to do so is irresponsible and I'm frankly surprised some members of this excellent forum keep suggesting what for him could be a potentially dangerous solution.

TP

I agree 100%.

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