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Pegasus/Galaxy Models Musketeer

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Jonathan M16/09/2020 22:40:58
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814 forum posts
316 photos

I've just ordered one of these on impulse today, as I really like the cheeky look of it, and the symmetrical section wings are foam so should be a fairly quick build.

**LINK**

Anyone know what they're like?

screen shot 2020-09-16 at 17.59.44.jpg

I have a well-running MDS 40 spare, so this would be my initial power-plant of choice. Good idea, or would summat else be 'better'?

The alternative is to electrify, in which case I'd ask George at 4-Max for a recommended setup.

Nigel R17/09/2020 07:38:57
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4070 forum posts
694 photos

Should fly nicely, and like you say won't take long to build, that is one super simple fuselage to put together.

MDS40 sounds good too.

Edited By Nigel R on 17/09/2020 07:52:16

Frank Skilbeck17/09/2020 08:01:13
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4806 forum posts
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I think I had one as my 1st low wing model, some 40 years ago. Would have flown with a Webra Speed 40. If I remember it did fly OK, although at the time I probably wasn't experienced enough to really comment laugh

Doctor Chinnery17/09/2020 09:36:42
54 forum posts

If it's a Galaxy design it'll be tough and a really nice flyer. My latest (the Wasp) is going together nicely despite, rather than because of the instruction sheet, however the included plan is exemplary and I could sort it all out without too much frustration. In their defence, when I phoned for help on another matter I was assured that they were aware of my concerns about the instruction sheets and redrafting of all the instruction sheets was in hand. Anyway, I've an unemployed old OS40 which I'm intending to get a Musketeer kit for - so that should say it all. Trad' British kits are generally stronger than all the pre-built, assemble-it-yourself imports, cost less and last longer and fly just as well. (Had to add that - it's an Axe I have been grinding for years!)

Jonathan M17/09/2020 09:57:29
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814 forum posts
316 photos
Posted by Doctor Chinnery on 17/09/2020 09:36:42:

If it's a Galaxy design it'll be tough and a really nice flyer. My latest (the Wasp) is going together nicely...

Trad' British kits are generally stronger than all the pre-built, assemble-it-yourself imports, cost less and last longer and fly just as well. (Had to add that - it's an Axe I have been grinding for years!)

Good to hear all that guys, and the more flying and building I do the more I'm coming to agree with Doc C's sentiments above!

Any piccies of your Wasp under construction?

Nigel R17/09/2020 10:00:49
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4070 forum posts
694 photos

Yes, the kit offerings in this style can afford to discount your labour cost and a few overnight glue-ups don't matter either way; an ARTF has to be designed with jig-locked-3d-puzzle style instant assembly for minimum labour.

Engine Doctor17/09/2020 11:09:22
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2579 forum posts
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Galaxy Models always were easy build good flying models designed on the KISS principle . Good to hear they are still going .

Far more rugged than the ARTF models that abound these days providing you have room to build .

Redex17/09/2020 12:14:42
168 forum posts

I have one and finished it a few weeks ago. Its an electric conversion but I have not maidened it yet. Soon I hope.

John Muir17/09/2020 12:15:45
385 forum posts
2 photos

Good all round sport aerobat and tough as old boots. Not tough enough to survive taking off with the aileron servo unplugged though so I'm on my second, comfortably powered by an OS40LA. I put small servos at the tail on this one and used two servos for the ailerons and added a steerable nosewheel. I think the MDS will make it ballistic but might make it a little nose heavy as I think it was originally meant for a plain bearing 35 or similar. Something to watch out for.

John Muir17/09/2020 12:21:39
385 forum posts
2 photos

Here's mine. Must get round to fitting the canopy.dscn4309.jpg

Redex17/09/2020 12:24:16
168 forum posts

I also did similar of putting servos in the wings for aileron control and a steerable nosewheel.

Shaun Walsh17/09/2020 12:39:44
382 forum posts
50 photos
Posted by Redex on 17/09/2020 12:14:42:

I have one and finished it a few weeks ago. Its an electric conversion but I have not maidened it yet. Soon I hope.

Would be interested if you could post details of your motor/prop/esc/battery combination. Was it easy to convert to electric power?

Nigel R17/09/2020 13:24:19
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4070 forum posts
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Posted by John Muir on 17/09/2020 12:15:45:

I think the MDS will make it ballistic but might make it a little nose heavy as I think it was originally meant for a plain bearing 35 or similar. Something to watch out for.

I would guess the Galaxy designs are originally from back when crossflow motors were common and those did tend to be lighter and less powerful than a more recent current motor. Maybe one of the SC36 or Irvine 36 type "small 40" motors would be good as well?

Bob Cotsford17/09/2020 13:57:09
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Back in the mists of times gone by I had one powered by a Merco 35 which was perfectly adequate by the standards of the day. Regarding costs vs ARTFs, in my experience kit builds often work out more expensive once you tot up the cost of all the accessories and covering but you have the satisfaction that it's all your own work.

Jonathan M17/09/2020 14:03:23
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814 forum posts
316 photos

That's right Bob, a bit dearer but immensely more satisfying!  What was the Merco 35 like?

Nigel - would a SC32 or an Enya 30 be up to snuff? Or keep an eye out for a 36?

Edited By Jonathan M on 17/09/2020 14:05:38

Redex17/09/2020 14:06:26
168 forum posts

My powertrain uses an Emax 2832/05 motor, 80A HK ESC, and 13*6.5 APCe prop. The LiPo is a 4S3600 30C Turnigy and the two wing servos are HS225MG. The Musketeer has an AUW of 2334 gms, hope this helps.

As with some conversions the difficult bit is how to mount the LiPo. The Musketeer has a wide fuselage so not to difficult to insert a flat ply plate and glue some under rails. On top of the ply plate I use velcro stuck to the plate and the LiPo lies on top of the ply plate, also secured with a velcro strap (belt and braces !!). The longish ply plate provides plenty of 'slide room' for setting CofG. To load the LiPo can be done by removing the top hatch that includes the canopy and pilot included.

Redex17/09/2020 14:19:37
168 forum posts

Sorry please ignore my previous post for the Musketeer powetrain - which was for a different model Dohhh.

My Musketeer has an Eflite P32, APCe 12*8, 4S3600 30C Turnigy JP EnErG ESC 60A with an AUW of 2312 gms

Bob Cotsford17/09/2020 16:23:27
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Posted by Jonathan M on 17/09/2020 14:03:23:

That's right Bob, a bit dearer but immensely more satisfying! What was the Merco 35 like?

......

I remember the Merco as being pretty reliable and easy enough to start but noisy by today's standards and power would be way down on the later schneurle ported ball raced engines. They were fairly big capacity engines for club flying in the early 70s, how times have changed!

Doctor Chinnery17/09/2020 16:24:26
54 forum posts
Posted by Jonathan M on 17/09/2020 09:57:29:
Posted by Doctor Chinnery on 17/09/2020 09:

Any piccies of your Wasp under construction?

Sorry Old Son - such technological jiggery pokery is beyond me and my iPad. Just at the point of installing the plastic Bowden Cable outers between servos and tail - then sheet the underside of the fuselage, and that's it. Next is sand the fuselage to shape with a small power detail sander. N.B. Put on dust mask, take mobile work table ( large retired ironing board retrieved from recycling with Ply reinforced MDF bolted on top ) to the far downwind side of the lawn, connect sander to long lead - job done in less than 15 minutes. And that's taking your time and taking care. One further NB. - Don't get carried away! - I usually work with '80' size grit, and when I reckon I'm nearly there switch to 120. Wipe over with a barely damp cloth and it's ready for a homeopathic dose of Balsaloc/Cover Grip.

( I'm waiting for the clouds to open and buckets of ordure to deposited on my nut for such sacrilege as replacing a David Plane and Sanding Blocks with a power detail sander - but it works for me. )

John Muir17/09/2020 16:32:04
385 forum posts
2 photos

My first Musketeer was initially powered by a dreadful old Magnum 40. It flew perfectly well on that and when it broke I fitted an SC36 which was a bit heavier but perked the plane up no end. The model met its demise not long after that unfortunately. A .32 would be plenty.

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