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Jet Pack Paramedic - Coming to a Hillside Near You!

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EvilC5729/09/2020 09:41:19
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This has just been covered by BBC Breakfast.

It seems the Great North Air Ambulance Service are seriously looking at using jet pack suits to rapidly deliver a paramedic to people in trouble on mountains...

**LINK**

Edited By EvilC57 on 29/09/2020 09:44:32

Robin Colbourne29/09/2020 10:34:53
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Looks a good application, and by flying low at least if an engine does give up its not far to fall.

How does the thrust from the engines support the pilot? Surely he's not taking all the load through his arms for the whole flight?

EvilC5729/09/2020 10:40:15
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I think he may have a larger engine on his back too.

Martin Harris29/09/2020 13:19:07
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Posted by Robin Colbourne on 29/09/2020 10:34:53:


How does the thrust from the engines support the pilot? Surely he's not taking all the load through his arms for the whole flight?

I have to say this was my first thought and makes me suspect this to be some sort of elaborate hoax - maybe someone can confirm that they've seen one of these set-ups working, first hand?

Geoff Copping29/09/2020 13:28:21
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I've been wondering about the chances of starting a moorland fire during the hot dry summers we get now.surprise

Chris Walby29/09/2020 14:05:24
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Worth watching the news article and then then their video of the day prior + the drone footage is quite impressive as well.

They are turbines not rockets so apparently its more hot air than flaming exhaust gas and the designer spooled it up in his lab on the radio! Their MK2 has a spool up time of 10 seconds as opposed to the 45 seconds for the MK 1.

One large pack turbine and 2 pairs of thrust vector ones on the arms.

They did admit that the major issue is flying time....where did you hear that previously..wink....is the drone dead, long live personal jet packs..at least it will take the focus off our flying.

 

Edited By Chris Walby on 29/09/2020 14:08:29

Robin Colbourne29/09/2020 14:58:58
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Posted by EvilC57 on 29/09/2020 10:40:15:

I think he may have a larger engine on his back too.

Thanks EvilC57, I missed the RR Olympus on his back; I assumed that was just fuel and his first aid kit.

J D 829/09/2020 15:10:41
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It's one thing doing this on a nice quite day, another thing all together if it's the more usual wind and/or mizzle ect we get in those high places.

/

Bob Cotsford29/09/2020 16:24:22
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and while it may not be far to fall in the event of a malfunction, it's still likely to result in two remote rescues instead of one isn't it?

Paul C.29/09/2020 16:35:38
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What could possibly go wrong 😨

Frank Skilbeck29/09/2020 17:06:39
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These were displayed in the docks at the Gloucester Tall Ships festival a couple of years ago, very impressive and very noisy!

Brian Sweeting 129/09/2020 18:26:15
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I did wonder what the payload is going to be.

One small first aid kit or will it be one small pilot plus a decent kit?

J D 829/09/2020 18:34:49
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A helicopter with a paramedic on the end of a winch line would still get there first.

As a Coastguard working with the Welsh air ambulance helo's I was impressed at the unusual and small places the pilots would put down to get their paramedic to the casualty.

Edited By J D 8 on 29/09/2020 18:40:15

MattyB30/09/2020 11:42:58
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Posted by Bob Cotsford on 29/09/2020 16:24:22:

and while it may not be far to fall in the event of a malfunction, it's still likely to result in two remote rescues instead of one isn't it?

Posted by J D 8 on 29/09/2020 18:34:49:

A helicopter with a paramedic on the end of a winch line would still get there first.

As a Coastguard working with the Welsh air ambulance helo's I was impressed at the unusual and small places the pilots would put down to get their paramedic to the casualty.

Agree with both these points - how many days is this actually going to be workable from a weather perspective, and how many times out of 10 will you have to call on the heli anyway to perform the evac? I would have thought a large multirotor with the capacity to provide a video comms link for triage and deliver basic first aid materials would in most cases be a better solution.

Rob30/09/2020 13:34:39
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Saw that article at work the other night funnily enough on an Ambulance station .......To say we laughed was an understatement.

Frank Skilbeck30/09/2020 13:50:23
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Posted by J D 8 on 29/09/2020 18:34:49:

A helicopter with a paramedic on the end of a winch line would still get there first.

As a Coastguard working with the Welsh air ambulance helo's I was impressed at the unusual and small places the pilots would put down to get their paramedic to the casualty.

Edited By J D 8 on 29/09/2020 18:40:15

In the Times today the Cumbrian mountain rescue say that by driving to a location and then using the jet pack they would be on scene in about a 3rd of the time it takes to get the air ambulance there. Also who decides to call the air ambulance, if you have to wait for mountain rescue to walk up the hill and make an assessment then it could be significantly longer again.

But as the article said they are going to trail it next year so lets see how that goes.

Robin Colbourne30/09/2020 14:39:43
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Posted by J D 8 on 29/09/2020 18:34:49:

A helicopter with a paramedic on the end of a winch line would still get there first.

As a Coastguard working with the Welsh air ambulance helo's I was impressed at the unusual and small places the pilots would put down to get their paramedic to the casualty.

Edited By J D 8 on 29/09/2020 18:40:15

How any Coastguard and Air Ambulance helicopters are there in the UK? There must be situations in which they are all occupied or too far away, when something like this jet pack would do what's necessary. Its early days for it, so I'm prepared to give it the benefit of the doubt.

Nigel R30/09/2020 15:14:00
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Posted by Martin Harris on 29/09/2020 13:19:07:

I have to say this was my first thought and makes me suspect this to be some sort of elaborate hoax - maybe someone can confirm that they've seen one of these set-ups working, first hand?

Lots of videos on youtube on these things. They're incredible.

Yes comments about weather and cost apply, that said, in this context one man plus some kit can be placed in some fairly tight spots quicker and cheaper than a heli can get there. Air ambulance are (I read) around £3k per callout. This jetsuit thing will be a lot less per use. If it replaces just one heli callout per day for a couple of years it has more than paid for itself.

I note that video linked is showing the air ambulance showing up some short while later. So we're looking at the the equivalent of the medic on a fast bike at an RTA - first response, not the heavy lifting that comes later.

"Saw that article at work the other night funnily enough on an Ambulance station .......To say we laughed was an understatement."

Cars, "never replace horses".

Computers, "what do I need a big calculator for?"

Personally, on a site devoted to flying things, I'm surprised at those not interested or pooh pooing it.

Tomtom3930/09/2020 15:14:55
696 forum posts
1 photos

Richard Browning the CEO of Gravity Industries  (and inventor) has been a modeller as well as a Marine. Another lad from our club is also involved in the design / development and was in the video. Having seen the pack, you have to give a small British company credit in trying to consider various applications for their work.

I suggest that the various doubters on this post look at Gravity Industries videos on Youtube. Robin , I understand that the Navy , Coastguard etc are all interested.

For info , the average flight time is 9 mins . However this is being extended as further development takes place.

Edited By Tomtom39 on 30/09/2020 15:15:51

Edited By Tomtom39 on 30/09/2020 15:21:32

alex nicol30/09/2020 15:49:49
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I saw this and thought it was quite interesting. Admittedly my first thought was what happens if it cuts out, which was promptly countered by he'll be ground skimming so no flying high which is fair enough. My big concern is the top speed of 85mph............ What happens if it goes dead stick at that speed

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