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Will old electric motors ever have the fascination that IC engines do?

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Dickw26/10/2020 10:30:28
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Posted by Capt Kremen on 26/10/2020 10:01:44:

Having flown electric for close to 40 years, (previously Oliver Tiger, Merco, K&B, OS, Webra, Cox, etc. etc.), I take a more positive approach.

The likes of Mabuchi (= most brushed motors badged by everyone of the time e.g. Graupner SPEED 400, 500, 600 etc.), Unger, Geist, Keller, Plettenberg and Astro were/are trailblazing electric motive power pioneers which have opened up and made accessible powered model flight to far more than i/c ever did IMHO.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and a well engineered electric motor is a joy to own and operate.

Edited By Capt Kremen on 26/10/2020 10:05:32

I agree. I keep my early motors etc. in the same drawer as things like an ED Racer, AM15, DC Merlin etc..

Photo attached of a Keller brushed motor and some Geist folding prop blades from the mid 1980s, plus one of the first brushless motors and its speed controller from the early 1990s complete with the 5 core connector for the Hall effect sensor in the motor. The Hall effect was how they originally determined the rotor movements before they realised they could do it by monitoring the phase voltages in the ESC.

Dick

early motors.jpg

Edited By Dickw on 26/10/2020 10:32:07

Nigel R26/10/2020 10:56:34
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They will, a bit, to a lesser audience, I think.

With electrics, is not much scope for fettling or tinkering, which makes them great for a reliable quick fix in smaller sizes. But generates less interest in the first place.

IC though, they are a thing in and of themselves.

Peter Miller26/10/2020 11:07:52
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Well, I hope that some people will start serious collecting of electric motors because I have a NIB Irvine 05 5 turn Cobalt motor in its wooden box with card wrapper.

One day it might even be worth money!!

In the mean time here is one for the collectors

miller 19 1.jpg

The Miller 19.from about 1974

ken anderson.26/10/2020 11:58:36
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no from me, looking at an electric motor doesn't have the same fascination

ken anderson...ne...1...motor dept.

Chris Walby26/10/2020 12:02:03
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Electric motors - IMHO no way as its a generational thing, as the Boss would say "glory days" and all that.

I don't think anyone one under 45 is really that interested in IC let alone something with a few magnets whizzing around with low power to weight performance. I fully expect IC will have long gone in my lifetime along with old electric stuff.

Example, we had someone donate complete models, BNIB 35 TX and other stuff to the club (father was a previous member) and those that picked through the stuff selected what they wanted. Just left some old IC stuff that no one else wanted....So I had the Laser 65, Jon said there are no spares + some advice, popped it in a model and it runs a dream. My point is that the older generation value things and the much younger generation don't as its of no interest to them.

My prediction is sell it now while there is still a market, because in 10 to 20 years time people will be collecting stuff that has USB ports on it.

Nigel R26/10/2020 13:49:39
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I think you're right Chris, I am only keeping stuff I think I am likely to use. frown

Matt Carlton26/10/2020 14:20:19
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I think IC will live on for as long as there's a market, even if that market is entirely second hand. The only issue I see is noise regulation.

That said, I don't think electric is always less intrusive than IC. I'd rather 'be disturbed' by the burble of a FS45 than a screaming electric motor, even if the actual dB are the same.

There will always be an enthusiast in a garage creating replacement parts, just as there are for various classic cars which are decades out of production.

There is no objective 'need' for people to spend weekends tinkering with old cars that need time, money and skill to keep on the road. They do so because a 1973 Cortina Mk3 has character and soul that a 2020 clone will never have.

 

Edited By Matt Carlton on 26/10/2020 14:20:43

Edited By Matt Carlton on 26/10/2020 14:21:16

john davidson 126/10/2020 14:42:55
78 forum posts

My love affair with I/C cooled a bit when a full container of glow fuel self siphoned out into the boot of my car, Suppose if it was lipos they cold do more damage!

PatMc26/10/2020 15:39:57
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Posted by Peter Christy on 26/10/2020 10:28:22:

Electric motors may be convenient, but they have no SOUL!

Car manufacturers strive to make their cars as near perfect as possible (OK, and cheaply as possible at the same time! wink ). Because of that they are BORING!

Classic cars are often popular, not because they were particularly good, but because their defects gave them character!

IC engines can be cantankerous and rebellious, but they have CHARACTER! I have never heard anyone suggest that an electric motor has character!

Yes, I have a few electric models. Some of the fields I fly at are electric only. Electric is convenient for a quick "fix" at a local field. But for enjoyment, give me IC any day!

--

Pete

IC engines don't have "soul" or "character" they have "characteristics" as do electric motors.

Peter Christy26/10/2020 16:05:52
1921 forum posts
Posted by PatMc on 26/10/2020 15:39:57:

IC engines don't have "soul" or "character" they have "characteristics" as do electric motors.

So are you telling me you've never cursed at a recalcitrant glow or diesel motor?

cheeky

--

Pete

perttime26/10/2020 18:04:24
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Cursing at a hobby item is fine. When it isn't working right, it is just another fun feature of the hobby. Your daily driver, on the other hand.... You generally want it to go, when you feel like going.

Peter Miller26/10/2020 18:11:35
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Posted by PatMc on 26/10/2020 15:39:57:

IC engines don't have "soul" or "character" they have "characteristics" as do electric motors.

CODSWALLOP!!!

Having been using non stop engines since 1954 I can tell you that they do have character and anyone who says that they don't has not used very many of the engines of the past.

Engine Doctor26/10/2020 18:59:24
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The younger modeller who only really know electric models have grown up in a throw-away society and if their electric motors burn out or the bearings wear out they just change the motor for a new one. Us older models on the other hand had to work hard to buy our engines and looked after them . If they were damaged or worn out we would often strip and repair them. I really enjoy rebuilding engines and have tried on a couple of occasions to re- wind an electric motor ,only successful on one of them. The engine rebuilds win hands down when it comes to satisfaction.

I can only think of electric motors as similar to my collection of cotton reelssmiley although I do enjoy electric power in EDF and a few other of my models.

kc26/10/2020 19:07:22
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In the future electric motors will have more value than ic. When they are scrapped and melted down the copper in the electric motors will be worth more than the scrap alloy from i.c !

PatMc26/10/2020 19:56:25
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Posted by Peter Christy on 26/10/2020 16:05:52:
Posted by PatMc on 26/10/2020 15:39:57:

IC engines don't have "soul" or "character" they have "characteristics" as do electric motors.

So are you telling me you've never cursed at a recalcitrant glow or diesel motor?

cheeky

--

Pete

Figuratively, yes.

Why do you ask ? smile p

PatMc26/10/2020 19:58:23
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Posted by Peter Miller on 26/10/2020 18:11:35:
Posted by PatMc on 26/10/2020 15:39:57:

IC engines don't have "soul" or "character" they have "characteristics" as do electric motors.

CODSWALLOP!!!

Having been using non stop engines since 1954 I can tell you that they do have character and anyone who says that they don't has not used very many of the engines of the past.

Codswallop !!!cheeky

Eric Robson26/10/2020 20:17:38
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I have 2 Me 109's both about 65" span a scale electric. and a sport scale i/c with a Saito 125 fs. they both fly well but give me the i/c one anytime for sound and duration, at the moment our field entrance is a quagmire, this is where electric is good, small case with batteries and t/x in one hand model in the other.

Just to look at it from another angle in the future will modellers have a yearning for long gone foamies like we fondly look back on Junior and Super Sixty's. At least we can make these models from plans, only problem looming is a shortage of balsa. How about a foam board Black Magic?

jeff2wings26/10/2020 20:41:19
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(Well l hope people continue to take this thread in the light hearted manner that it's meant and not get to upperty about it, we are all nerds together here cool !

Well given a choice between this

img_20201026_202129.jpg

Or this?....

img_20201026_201944.jpg

Or maybe this........

img_20201026_201845.jpg

No prizes for guessing my preference laugh

kevin b26/10/2020 20:41:30
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Posted by Doc Marten on 26/10/2020 10:00:32:
Posted by brokenenglish on 26/10/2020 09:56:09:
Posted by kevin b on 26/10/2020 09:44:34:

It depends on how electric motors develop in the future and the attitude of "collectors".

If you had told a modeller in the early 50's that an ED Bee, or Mills in its box would be worth more than 20 weeks wages in 50 years time they would have told you not to be so stupid.

IMO, the question doesn't really concern monetary value or week's wages.

I had an ED Bee in the early fifties, and I wanted to keep it, just because it was interesting and great fun, and it's been that way ever since...

Precisely.

It's not about monetary value, it's about attachment and sentimentality.

Sorry. I didn't mean to go off topic, but to some a monetary value of an item can add to its fascination. My point was that just because this generation feels a certain way about something doesn't mean to say that future generations will feel the same. Youngsters today for instance, look at the Harrier "jump jet" in the same light that many of the current aeromodelling generation look at the Sopwith Pup.

kevin b26/10/2020 20:43:27
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Posted by jeff2wings on 26/10/2020 20:41:19:

(Well l hope people continue to take this thread in the light hearted manner that it's meant and not get to upperty about it, we are all nerds together here cool !

Well given a choice between this

Or this?....

Or maybe this........

img_20201026_201845.jpg

No prizes for guessing my preference laugh

I totally agree and if that is your collection face 7.

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