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Aerobatic manoeuvres

suddenly I realised that I need to know more manoeuvre names

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Graham's flying schedule

Graham's flying schedule

by popular demand - 4/3/09

Phil Winks05/03/2009 20:17:35
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The publishing by Graham of his summer flight routine suddenly made me aware that my knowledge of the various manouver names is woe fully inadequate. for instance what is a derry turn? and exactly what is a reversal (what I thought it was turns out to be an innelmann)or are there more than one version of some manoeuvres or perhaps more than one name to others. does any one have a reference work that defines for once and all what manoeuvre is what!
Ben Mullins05/03/2009 20:28:34
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Hi phil,
 
 This was a link on something else a couple of days ago, How to . . . aerobatics! Its a series of youtube videos telling you the name, manouver and how to do it!
Jonathan Lewzey05/03/2009 21:53:39
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A reversal is the opposite of the imellman. fly in a straight line at 45 degrees to horizontal, half roll then half loop. no idea what a derry turn is.
Gemma Jane05/03/2009 22:29:58
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I have the same problem Phil, so a good thread for me. Great link Ben!
 
I found this explanation for a Derry Turn
 
 
I think the main picture is actually reversed looking at the description
David Ashby - Moderator06/03/2009 07:25:15
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Good thread Phil,
 
I like the Derry turn as it can suprise people watching and expecting the model to complete the full 360-turn.
 
Superb link that Ben , thank you. Must get practising
Rick Tee06/03/2009 07:50:52
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There are multiple names for some manoeuvers, split S = reversal, probably another americanism, like hammer head (stall turn).
Phil Winks06/03/2009 20:47:17
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Wow cool responses lads and lasses bit suprised to see your response Gemma thought you were/are a goddess of flight and therefore would know this lol  Just joking Gemma. as for the derry turn David been doing that sort of for a bit just never knew the name actually never thought it would have a name now to spend some time on Bens link
Ben Mullins06/03/2009 21:17:58
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Found the link, now just need the skill to fly them!
Andy Harris06/03/2009 22:39:31
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Gemma Jane06/03/2009 22:58:31
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LOL Phil, I've been a passenger in a T6 which did a couple of rolls and I had control for a loop, to be honest I had my eyes shut through most of it, that is about as much experience as I have of aeros! One reason I just love aviation, there is always more to learn.
Phil Winks07/03/2009 11:21:18
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Seems we have a bug in the system folks I've read your post in the email Andy but just a blank post in here  
quote from email
Is the Derry Turn illegal ? 
It has the model flying directly towards the crowd line according to the diagram.

 

Posted By Andy Harris on 06/03/2009 22:39:31.

I think that the derry turn is wrongly described in the sketch mate as indeed if it was performed as shown it would be illegal but if you read the description it is performed away from the spectator line ie: the opposite direction to the sketch.
Now thats the challenge Ben  as is getting a craft that can actually do all these wonderful manoeuvres
Hmm does that mean that as a passenger I've got a tad more aerobatic experience than you Gemma? The few air experience flights I had in a chippie and a beaver as an air cadet included loops, what I now know as a Derry turn even a cuban and a spin of sorts hell thats disorientating but never threw up unlike some of my mates at the time and the wild manoeuvres I experienced while a photographer/passenger in army air corps scouts and gazelles where something else
Ernie07/03/2009 12:09:03
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Sorry to be pedantic guys, but it's Immelmann, Max Immelmann
ernie
Broken Prop07/03/2009 12:39:03
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and this is how he did it...
 
 
Great thread! 

Big Bandit07/03/2009 13:02:03
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Hi All,
 
Just had a look at the how to aerobatics, and in particular the Fidget bipe. Brilliant little thing. Tony's models and hobbies were selling them at £19 so I had 3 some of the lads at the Leicester club had 6 each.
 
Cheers,
 
Chris.
Tony Richardson07/03/2009 18:04:16
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Thanks for the heads-up on this thread David because I had no idea what a "Derry Turn" was or who first performed it, now I do, it would appear ( model flying at public events aside ) that a Derry Turn is a manouvre by a pilot in a turn of one direction but changes his/her mind and instead of rolling back to level flight and turning opposite direction rolls through inverted and obtains a banking turn in the opposite direction?  This could also be used  as a reversing (non competative)  manouvre at the end of the flight line could it not, similar to a procedure turn, peformed with a fast moving warbird at the end of a straffing run, a climbing turn away from the runway, roll trough inverted, decsending turn in the opposite direction and ready to straff the runway again, or is this already called something else?
Phil Winks07/03/2009 19:32:14
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You can bet your bottom dollar it has a name already Tony all we need is someone to tell us what it is.  as for being used to line a warbird up for a 2nd strafing run ok if he's a solitary plane but otherwise what about his fellow attackers following him through would that not put him head to head with them
Tony Richardson07/03/2009 19:57:25
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Good point Phil, as a model pilot I like to fly solo for that very reason, two or more fliers would have to co-ordinate their routine, never been a fullsize warbird pilot so would imagine it could get hairy at times ( often wondered how many mid-airs their were in wwii???)  I live pretty close to a US air base that is just across the water from us, the odd time I have got to watch the birds fly they seem to be in pairs and the wingman is pretty close to his lead.
 
I was back home in the UK a few  years ago and while staying with relatives in Cumbria was fortunate enough to witness two Tornados chasing a BAE Hawk for practice, my wife and I were out walking and were atop a high hill on one side of a valley when these three aircraft cme screaming down the valley and we were able to look down at them as they passed, very interesting perspective, I digress I know, but my point is I have mostly seen attack aircraft in pairs only, is this the norm, to split the flight into pairs with designated targets/objectives if so good communication between the pilots would allow for the previously described manouvre, I think???
Gemma Jane07/03/2009 23:45:30
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Yep Andy, I have very limited experience of aeros though I did do in style - after all it isn't every day you can get a flight in a T6 Harvard  (anyone who wants to offer me one in a P51 D, just PM )
 
As soon as my business picks up after the apparent collapse of the economy... it's off to get some time on Chippies, I miss being upside down, it's not really advisable in a PA-28
 
Throwing up isn't a big deal really, many people get sick at first in small aircraft, I suffered from air sickness for the first 7hrs of training a 30 degree bank would turn me green and make me reach for the paper back, you can imagine how my first stalls lesson went  - in time it goes away as the sensations become 'normal'. I know a couple of aeros instructors who still get sick when the student has control because their brains are not ahead of what sensation is coming next - that is all it is, a confusion between the signals from the inner ear and the eyes that causes a bit of brain overload... god knows why it is wired up to empty ones stomach though!
Rick Tee08/03/2009 06:38:05
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I believe its wired to empty your stomach as a poison prevention, the symtoms being associated with eating something toxic.
Phil Winks08/03/2009 11:13:10
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Now that makes sense Rick I guess I've just been lucky never had motion sickness ever even on the north sea ferries when fetching vehs back for refurb from Germany allways got a rough crossing as we fetched them back in the winter period. there's me on the mess deck tucking into a full english and my mates all topside looking green the cooks loved me

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