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The new ARTF WOT4

The new ARTF WOT4

First look...... - 28/9/09

Simon B04/07/2010 10:23:11
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284 photos
I agree.  All too often experienced modellers forget that everyone had to start somewhere.  I often ask a lot of questions on here, but if I didn't have my dad to ask for help I know i'd have asked a lot more over the last couple of years!
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator04/07/2010 15:10:27
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I totally agree with Simon and Paul - you ask all the questions you want to Darren - no one was born knowing how to do this stuff and putting your first plane together without help ain't easy! A lot of what this forum is about is helping newcomers and encouraging them.
 
Now, about these hinges of yours. Well the advice is sound, you don't need to go to all of the expense and trouble of ordering replacement parts mate - we can fix this, we have the technology!
 
Two ways, first the easy one:
 
1. If you can't get the old hinges out just cut them off flush with the tailplane and the elevator. Then cut yourself some new slots - away from the old ones - and install new hinges. With a bit of care, once its all together no one but you will ever know! You can buy new mylar hinges (or mylar strip to cut them from) from any decent hobby shop and it only costs "buttons"! In the old days I didn't even buy the mylar (had no money when I was a student!) so I used to use the plastic stuff they made floppy discs from after roughing it up with a bit of wire wool!
 
When fitting the new hinges just make a neat slit in the tailplane (away from the first attempt slits) with a sharp knife, then drill a 1mm hole at the centre of the slit. Put a dressmakers pin in the centre of your hinge (at right angles to the plane of the hinge) then insert the hinge in the slit - right upto the pin. Next make a matching slit in the elevator - again drill a 1mm hole in the centre of the slit. Put say two hinges each side (left and right). Then assemble the elevator to the tailplane - being careful to check that the hinges are more or less half in the elevator and half in the tailplane (that's one of the reasons for the pin). Push the two parts together - so trapping the pins in the hinges. Now remove the pins - but don't close the gap they created (that's the second reason for the pin). Carefully bend back the elevator and put two or three drops (not more) of cyno onto the bit of hinge material you can see. This cyno will "wick" into the slit - using the 1mm hole you drilled - and will fix the hinges. Turn the tailplane and elevator over and do the same on the other side. Give the whole thing a couple of minutes to settle, then work the elevator up and down just incase any cyno got to where it shouldn't. Result - instant hinged elevator! Much better than using epoxy.
 
2. If the elevator is really, really chewed up - and it doesn't look it, but if it is, just use it as a "pattern" to make another new one. This second method needs a bit more work. Get some suitable thickness balsa from a model shop, draw round the existing elevator and cut out. The new elevator will be a little bit oversize - because of the drawing around - so just gently sand it until it exactly matches the old one. When you are at the model shop buying the balsa buy 1m of white Solarfilm off the roll at the same time. For instructions on how to apply the Solarfilm just go to Solarfilm's website - they have two excellent videos there that show you how to do it. Don't worry about having a special iron like in the video for this job, just borrow the household iron - but be careful to set the temperature right using the technique they show in the video.
 
I'd try method one first if I were you - then if that doesn't work - e.g. you cant find enough tailplane/elevator area for new slits - then use method two. Either of these will get you sorted at a fraction of the cost/time of trying to get spares! Aeromodellers tend to be very proud of their ability to repair stuff without using spares - its part of the fun. And its how you start to get more interested in building more complex models!
 
Good luck - any questions, just ask!
 
BEB
Myron Beaumont04/07/2010 15:36:19
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5797 forum posts
51 photos
I did explain about fuel tank pipes & I assume the last few comments were made in my direction .  I always have & always will try & help newcomers .We all have had to start somewhere .For instance ,I just cannot get the hang of programming digital stuff from the word go,& now I have a sort of phobia about it .I need all the advice in the most simplistic terms & still I find it difficult . 'tis mi age I think ! 

Edited By Myron Beaumont on 04/07/2010 15:40:37

Paul Slade04/07/2010 15:46:32
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10 forum posts
Actuall no Myron, my comment was not aimed at you at all. The offending post appears to have been removed, somebody telling the lad to use his brains for a change. Personally I thought that just plain un called for.
 
All the best
 
Paul
 
Edit: never Assume: It just makes an ASS of U and Me

Edited By Paul Slade on 04/07/2010 15:47:40

Tim Mackey04/07/2010 17:30:33
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20920 forum posts
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Yes I removed it.
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator04/07/2010 17:34:53
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No Myron, not at you at all. We all know you give a lot of time to helping beginners.
 
I was very amuzed though at the thought of an "old hand" like you with their eyebrows dissapearing around the back of their head at the thought of buying a replacement elevator  But as you say - we all have to learn!
 
BEB
250quadguy8405/07/2010 08:44:05
122 forum posts
1 photos
Thanks for the help guys , and yes its nice to know that forums once again are a great source of information. Glad that it seems that this could be repaired, hopefully I should have enough surface area on the elevators to make some more hindge slots. There should be enough room on either side of the elevator but I will have to see, if there is I will use Biggles 1st method by using my craft knife to carefully make some new slots then drill a 1mm hole for the pins to help guide the new hinges in.
 
I will let you know my progress, wish me luck
 
 
 
 
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator05/07/2010 09:44:50
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Hi Darren,
 
to be really clear - the pins do not go in the holes! The pins go through the hinges - at right angles to the holes. Its really difficult to explain - but dead easy to do! The pin should end up trapped between the elevator and the tailplane pointing downwards and going through the hinge! You then remove it.
 
It will help to look at this  - which is the assembly manual for the Pulse XT40 - take a read through section 1 - Installing the ailerons - there are loads of pictures of this method there.
 
BEB
250quadguy8405/07/2010 10:36:21
122 forum posts
1 photos
Ahh I see, that much clearer.
 
I will see how I get on with this. I might need to take another trip back to the model shop. I purchased some CA hinges, which are quite thin, thinner than the ones that came with the model. What I dont want to happen is for it to become an issue on installing, I will see how it goes though.
 
Thanks for the further instruction
Graeme Evans05/07/2010 18:55:00
36 forum posts
7 photos
personally I find the thinner hinges easier to install - and may I say an excellent choice of manual to refer to, I really like the Pulse XT 40

Edited By Graeme Evans on 05/07/2010 18:56:42

Ernie05/07/2010 19:23:02
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2542 forum posts
24 photos
Also, Put tape along the length of the joint between the tailplane and the elevator.
It improves aerodynamics, and covers a multitude of joining problems
Blendorm ( from your local chemist ) is great
 
ernie 
250quadguy8407/07/2010 21:21:15
122 forum posts
1 photos
Cool I will use the thinner ones I think as suggested , still havnt managed to pluck up enough courage just yet,lol. But I have been taking on some other work whilst I do.
 
The fuel tank completely set-up and tested for leaks by placing in a sink and blowing through all the tubes and putting pressure in to the tank, looking for bubbles, abit like you would with a bike innatube. No leaking air


Got the tank positioned in the front of the plane alhough its not fitted properly yet, I have also fitted exhaust to engine and got all the fuel/vent/fill lines fed through, I need to trim down the tubes abit as they are abit long so to make them neater ill trim them abit, although this wont be done just yet.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited By Pete B - Moderator on 18/07/2018 22:45:44

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator07/07/2010 21:59:56
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Looking fine that Darren
 
BEB
250quadguy8407/07/2010 22:55:27
122 forum posts
1 photos
Also just fitted the throttle control rod and centered the servo, the servo horn is not quite at 90 degree's, but its set up so that with the throttle control stick all the way down (idle) the carb is about 1mm open to allow enough for the engine to start/tick over on idle, and with the throttle control stick all the way up, the carb is all the way open (full throttle)
 
 

Edited By Pete B - Moderator on 18/07/2018 22:40:31

250quadguy8407/07/2010 23:15:51
122 forum posts
1 photos
Also here is a short video of my throttle control rod iv just installed, all the rest of the servos have been centered but are not connected to the reciever in this video so it may not look like they were centered, but they are.


Throttle at idle means carb open 1mm to allow start/idle, then full throttle = carb fully open.
Graeme Evans07/07/2010 23:31:35
36 forum posts
7 photos
be sure that you can close that throttle all the way, though the use of the throttle trim (or throttle cut button) is often used to close the final bit you will want to be able to stop your engine on demand. 
 
if your Irvine is anything like mine the gap you're leaving open there would be a fast idle, it will run with a little less than that.
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator07/07/2010 23:54:11
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Not at all bad! But Graeme is right. Set the bottom end so that with the throttle trim right back the barrel is just closed. That way at about midlde throttle trim you should get a nice steady tick over. It will also allow you to set up the throttle kill switch so that you can stop the engine quickly from the transmitter if you want to - and you will! You can't really finalise the bottom end setting until you have the engine running and even then you'll have to make a few small adjustments as the engine is "run in".
 
If you get and buzzing from the servo at either end of the travel just use the travel limit option on your transmitter - takening the ends "in" until the buzzing just stops.
 
Its coming along nicely! Wont be long now until the first flight. Have you got a club set up ready?
 
BEB
250quadguy8408/07/2010 06:48:53
122 forum posts
1 photos
Ah my bad, so with the throttle stick all the way at the bottom with no trim the carb should be fully closed/no gap, but this still allows it to start/tick over at idle? I was advised to leave a small 1mm gap for this. Please confirm this though if its the wrong way to go?
 
I did have buzzing from the servo, but I just loosened the control rod slightly as it was over taught.
 
There is a club down the road from me, so when everything is set-up, and the engine is run in, im going to join.
 

Graeme Evans08/07/2010 08:47:48
36 forum posts
7 photos
 
With the throttle all the way back AND the throttle trim adjusted all the way down there must be NO GAP - at this setting your engine will NOT RUN.
 
If you don't do this you will not be stop the engine when you want to.
 
To run your engine the idle speed will be set by how far up you adjust your trim, but this is something that you will have to play with when you have your engine running.
 
Running in your engine is detailed in the information that came with, and it is imperative you follow these instructions, but you will require to be able to stop the engine on demand during this process. 
 
To get your engine to run smoothly join and ask about at your local club, it takes hands on to fine tune your engine fuel mixture and it's something other members of your local club will be well practised at. 
 
The only advice I can give as you are just starting out, don't adjust the low end fuel mixture. It's the screw in the lower end of the carb. The factory setting is close enough and until the engine is run in any changes could give you trouble.
250quadguy8408/07/2010 22:08:40
122 forum posts
1 photos
Few more bits done tonight, filters in, prop on, went to prime and start engine, went to hook up the align regulator earth cable and glow lead but may need to extend the glow lead
 
Iv managed to get the regulator earth cable through, that has enough length to allow the regulator to sit in the radio bay, but the red glow ignition wire (with croc clip) is way too short, so im going to extend it, either a soldering iron or a junction box, a junction box would be alot easier for me

What type of wire should be ok for this?


 

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