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how to get the plan onto the wood!

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Daniel Jehan27/09/2010 15:51:11
6 forum posts
Hi, I am building my first plane from plan - Tony Nijhuis dogfight double spitfire.  I am looking fro suggestions to get the plan outline onto the wood for cutting.
 
Regards
 
Dan
Steve Hargreaves - Moderator27/09/2010 16:02:26
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6756 forum posts
197 photos
Daniel, I trace the parts from the plan onto card using carbon paper (yes you can still get it!!!) & then cut out card templates. I use these to draw around onto the wood with a soft pencil or Bic biro....doing it this way allows me to make use of the existing straight edges of the wood...if you lay the plan over & trace directly onto the wood its very hard to see exactly where you are in relation to the edge.
 
I usually get the plan copied at Protaprint o avoid messing up the original & this can offer another alternative....place the plan over the wood & use a warn iron to "iron" the plan onto the wood (set the iron to "Wool" that should work) This will transfer an image onto the wood but can also warp your wood if you're not careful........the card templates work best for me!!!
kc27/09/2010 16:19:09
6420 forum posts
173 photos
I find the most accurate way is to trace the shape onto tracing paper  ( greaseproof paper on a roll form Tesco, Boots etc )  using a straightedge where possible.  Then the tracing is stuck to the wood using small pieces of double sided tape and then cut right through tracing paper into wood with the scalpel.  Again use a straightedge if possible.   On balsa the cut is made right through but on ply it is just scored.  Then run a very sharp pencil around the score marks and cut using a saw or heavy duty knife for ply up to 1/16.
 
If you can photocopy the plan then the photocopy is stuck on with doublesided tape and cut right through.  The latest printer /scanner copiers seem to copy exactly to size and some can have the hinged lid removed to copy into the middle of a large plan. ( weight the plan down with books onto the glass )

Edited By kc on 27/09/2010 16:23:20

Richard Wood27/09/2010 16:44:26
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1096 forum posts
164 photos
Another quick method - for example to draw out balsa fuselage sides,
is to cut out small squares in the plan at a few points on the outline.
Lay the plan over the wood using the 'windows' you've just cut out
to align a suitable straight edge of the plan with a straight edge on
the balsa underneath.
Pin through the rest of the outline into the balsa - You'll easily be
able to see these pin marks to draw an outline.
Check balsa sheet edges are true first - they're often not!
This method obviously means making little holes in the plan,
but it doesn't really spoil it.
 
 

Edited By Richard Wood on 27/09/2010 16:50:37

Vecchio Austriaco27/09/2010 17:39:08
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1498 forum posts
707 photos
Have a look at this blog - a bit further down. This is how the lazy Austrian guys do it. You need a scanner and an ink-jet printer as well as textile transfer sheets.  You have to scan the plan - or a part of the plan - first and you have to be sure not to change scale. To do this draw a scale mark on the original plan - for instance a line showing exactly 10 cm. Make a second mark 90° to the first one. Make a test print after scanning on ordinary paper to see if both marks are still 10 cm. If yes follow the procedure as described. Don't forget to mirror immage the scan! Good luck!
 
GONZO27/09/2010 19:44:50
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1354 forum posts
14 photos
Try this SITE for decal/transfers paper and iron on tranfer paper for scaning plan then print and transfer to wood.
Vecchio Austriaco27/09/2010 20:32:25
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1498 forum posts
707 photos
Nice link Gonzo, have you or somebody ever tried the waterslide papers they are offering?  If yes - any comments - experience? VA
 
 
twinstar27/09/2010 21:21:45
221 forum posts
23 photos
instead of printing a copy of the the plan and ironing it onto the wood you can simply draw around the parts on the plan using a biro and tracing paper, then iron the back of the tracing paper on a mild heat, down onto the wood and the ink with transfer across.bad idea for very thin balsa though. heat will warp it.
 
on some awkward shapes what ive done is to cut a template (tracing paper), making sure its accurate to the plan, then tacking it onto the balsa with tape / dabs of pritt stick, then marking dots about every 5mm around the edge of the tracing paper, the template is then removed and the dots joined up. you then cut outside of the line and offer it up to the plan, you can then trim the part accordingly with a david plane or sanding block until its just right.. its a bit of a faff but sometimes works well for me.
 
just try different techniques and see which works for you, though as important as accurate parts is accuracy and straightness in the build much of which comes with experience / practice.. rulers wheever possible, use clamps so stuff doesnt move, use a flat building board that will allow pins into it. Make sure all parts that are the same on both sides of the plan are actually the same on both sides and not slighly different, (do this by holding both of them together to make sure, ligning up their flat edges against a flat surface usually exposes any ares aheres theres a difference between them) measure lots, use set squares wherever theres a 90 join (eg a rib to a spar) and when you do cut parts use a sharp scalpel. when cutting through the balsa make sure the blade is at 90 degrees to the flat surface of the balsa and not some other almost 90 degree angle as otherise one siude of the part may be a bit bigger or smaller than it should be. straight scalpel blades are for cutting curves, becuase they are narrower in depth and curved scalpels are for cutting strght edges. Always cut along a metal ruler where possible, rather than freehanding it... the list is endless.
 

twinstar27/09/2010 21:22:15
221 forum posts
23 photos
instead of printing a copy of the the plan and ironing it onto the wood you can simply draw around the parts on the plan using a biro and tracing paper, then iron the back of the tracing paper on a mild heat, down onto the wood and the ink with transfer across.bad idea for very thin balsa though. heat will warp it.
 
on some awkward shapes what ive done is to cut a template (tracing paper), making sure its accurate to the plan, then tacking it onto the balsa with tape / dabs of pritt stick, then marking dots about every 5mm around the edge of the tracing paper, the template is then removed and the dots joined up. you then cut outside of the line and offer it up to the plan, you can then trim the part accordingly with a david plane or sanding block until its just right.. its a bit of a faff but sometimes works well for me.
 
just try different techniques and see which works for you, though as important as accurate parts is accuracy and straightness in the build much of which comes with experience / practice.. rulers wheever possible, use clamps so stuff doesnt move, use a flat building board that will allow pins into it. Make sure all parts that are the same on both sides of the plan are actually the same on both sides and not slighly different, (do this by holding both of them together to make sure, ligning up their flat edges against a flat surface usually exposes any ares aheres theres a difference between them) measure lots, use set squares wherever theres a 90 join (eg a rib to a spar) and when you do cut parts use a sharp scalpel. when cutting through the balsa make sure the blade is at 90 degrees to the flat surface of the balsa and not some other almost 90 degree angle as otherise one siude of the part may be a bit bigger or smaller than it should be. straight scalpel blades are for cutting curves, becuase they are narrower in depth and curved scalpels are for cutting strght edges. Always cut along a metal ruler where possible, rather than freehanding it... the list is endless.
 

GONZO27/09/2010 22:22:19
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1354 forum posts
14 photos
VA, sorry I have no experience of the waterslide papers
Grahamd28/09/2010 13:17:15
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154 forum posts
1 photos
Simplest way ?
 
nip into a haberdaheries (or hobbycraft) and get a dress makers pin wheel (used for marking out patterns onto material. Put wood under plan and trace using wheel (makes small pin holes in plan and wood, but is 100% easy and accurate).
sparks5928/09/2010 13:32:19
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217 forum posts
105 photos
Posted by Grahamd on 28/09/2010 13:17:15:
Simplest way ?
 
nip into a haberdaheries (or hobbycraft) and get a dress makers pin wheel (used for marking out patterns onto material. Put wood under plan and trace using wheel (makes small pin holes in plan and wood, but is 100% easy and accurate).
 I like that idea! Must try it! Cheers Grahamd
sparks
Barrie Dav 229/09/2010 07:59:30
1012 forum posts
14 photos
I agree with Steve Hargreaves.  It takes a little more time initially but you have a ready supply of templates if later repairs are needed, at which point you will save time.  Paper often distorts when ironed.
Ady Hayward19/02/2011 11:47:58
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734 forum posts
1224 photos
Hi,
My preferred method is to trace the parts on to a sheet of A4 paper with a 2b pencil, then turn the sheet over on to the wood and trace again the outline on the reverse side. It leaves a pencil trace on the wood. Turn over the paper again and repeat. You get both sides to then leave traces on the wood.
 
Ady
Martin Roberts10/06/2011 09:37:25
87 forum posts
Hi guys, I know this is a relatively old thread, have you thought about puting trace paper in you copiers/printers, I get an A0 trace print for a couple of dollars (AUD) at my plan printer (approx. 1 1/2 pounds UK), then you can keep the original safe and clean in the draw, you get to turn the trace over for the mirror image, then whatever you build it is exactly opposite hand, additionally any thing you have printed/copied etc can be instantly aligned on the timber without a need for holes/viewing ports etc..... hope this helps you all...we are used to looking at the bottom side of a plan down here in the land down under!!!!!!!
 
Marty
Terence Lynock18/04/2012 01:05:11
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2453 forum posts
46 photos

I just scan the plan in parts allowing an overlap then stick them together, cut out the bits you want then stick them down to the wood with PritStick, after cutting out the parts just moisten the paper and peel it off.

If the part is long and thin then allow plenty of waste around the sides so the print doesnt distort as you paste it down,apply a thin even coat of PritStick to the wood not the paper,, if the paper bubbles or cockles then leave it as it will shrink out back to normal as it dries.

I have been using this method for years, only waste is a bit of paper and ink, doesnt damage the plan and no real fiddly bits to handle.

 

Edited By Terence Lynock on 18/04/2012 01:08:40

Djay18/04/2012 09:56:34
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543 forum posts
445 photos

Seconded Terence's method.

Just copy the part onto thick photocopy paper, cut out, stick to the wood or lay it on the wood and draw around it, and cut marginally oversize.

remove the paper and check it aginst the plan and sand to correct size if required.

Does not take to long, and you have the paper template for reusing part if required.

Darryl

Roger Bird18/04/2012 15:53:36
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93 forum posts
20 photos

I use the same method as Terence and Djay to good effect. As well as using realy cheap glue sticks I use 'clear plastic tape' as well.

This unsures a captive template whilst cutting and also gives the template a nice permanent plastic coating. (no streching or tearing). These templates can then be stored and be used again and again.

Steve W-O18/04/2012 16:04:40
2775 forum posts
310 photos

The wheel method is easier now HK have Mr Spike in stock. I add one to every order in case they become hard to get again. Mr Spike and carbon paper work well.

Miketgd18/04/2012 18:49:33
69 forum posts
22 photos

You could always ask your father-in-law!,

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