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Building boards.

A temporary big board

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Terence Lynock10/01/2011 22:48:23
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Looking around for a big building board or something to make one from I realised three had been looking me in the face all day, B&Q pink foam slabs are just the job for building big wings on, flat and rigid and lightweight too.
You can drive pins in easily and when you have finished with it you cut it up and build another plane with it, hows that for recycling?.
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator10/01/2011 23:35:57
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Good idea!
 
You're on a winning streak with foam at the moment Terry!
 
BEB
Geoff Smith 111/01/2011 06:31:04
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Hiya all, I was going to put a thread on here about this very subject but as this is already here I  hope Terence won't mind me elbowing in. I intend to have a go at building a plane from a kit in the very near future and I wonder what everyone uses for a building board? My situation dictates that whatever I use must be movable because I will have to use the dining room table as my workbench. Cheers
Geoff 
Bob Cotsford11/01/2011 07:55:23
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I use an old kitchen work-top lined with Sundeala(sp?) - the soft board used for noticeboards etc..  The worktop being around 30mm thick is pretty stable and flat, and the sundeala takes pins nicely.  The whole lot sits on teh coffe table in front of the telly, but can be moved easily without disturbibg any structure pinned on it.
andy watson11/01/2011 08:12:24
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Kitchen worktop with plasterboard on top, excellent- cheap (that sundeala costs a bomb!) but not very portable.
 
When I tried building a plane at school I used a piece of chipboard instead of kitchen worktop that I ran a couple of battens underneath- that worked well. (still had plasterboard on top)
Geoff Smith 111/01/2011 08:37:22
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Thanks for this gentlemen. Will plasterboard remain stable and flat given the changing temperatures it will be subjected to?  Do pins go into blockboard?  
Whilst here and going off thread, where is a good place to buy a traditionally built plane, it all seems to be ARTF these days. Cheers
Geoff 
 
Peter Miller11/01/2011 08:46:41
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It depends on how big a model you are going to build. For my models I use the following
 
Melamine covered chipboard with two layers of self adhesive  cork tiles on top. These are nearly 1/4" thick giving t a total thickness of nearly 1/2" for the pins. (Look on Ebay for Cork Tiles) Insulation board also works on top of chipboard or blockboard. Blockboard can be bought in any size up to 8 ft X 4ft and is much more stable than chipboard.
 
I use 48" X 12" boards. I have two which allows me to built two wings at a time. I can lay one wing, move the board off the bench and put the second up and work on the second wing.
 
The only point is that the bench or table must be flat because over a period of time the chipboard can sag if left for too long on a non flat surface.

 
 

Edited By Peter Miller on 11/01/2011 08:49:43

Geoff Smith 111/01/2011 09:03:27
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Many thanks for this Peter, excellent, I hadn't thought of cork tiles. Ideas to ponder on. Cheers Geoff  
ken anderson.11/01/2011 09:18:07
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just roll up the carpet in the lounge/diner etc......you'll get a bit /lot of ear ache....but we're the boss(aren't we?).........
 
 
 ken anderson   ne...1.      ..looking for accomadation shortly.....   
David Gilder11/01/2011 09:33:54
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Geoff.
 
So you want to do a "traditional build"!     Have you seen the threads on here about the Mass Build?  We have jus finished voting on it and the winner is the Steve Webb Models - Webbit.
It can be I/C or Electric!!  and you would be joining a group of people in doing this model...
 
Have a look at the threads....Here , Here and Here!
 
Would be great to have you onboard for this Mass Build!!
 
Dave
John Laird11/01/2011 09:40:51
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Modern indoor doors are light and built up from 2 surface layers and egg carton type spacers.  they retain flatness quite well and if surfaced with cork tiles as suggested above will give a  light large flat pinnable surface.. pick them up at low cost at either local DIY ( dmaged ones ) or scrap at public recycle depot.  Cut length ways to size and cut 2 "handles" into it for ease of handling
 
My own bldg board comprises 2 scrap office desks joind with 3 sheets of 6 by 2 ft blockboards to give building desk 6 by 6 which collects odds and sods leaving me with marginal bldg space  but the potential is there when I need it
 
john
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator11/01/2011 09:56:31
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Snap Peter - exactly the same, Melamine board - but mine is 6'x3' - again covered with a double layer of cork tiles!
 
Plaster board is good and very popular - bit it can be a bit heavy. Cost wise there is not much difference between cork and plasterboard - provided you source your cork tiles sensibly. I got mine as an "end of line" at Wicks dead cheap!
 
On sourcing a traditional kit. Well they may not be obvious on the retailers websites - but there is in fact a huge selection, these days mainly from smaller specialist suppliers. Which ones to look at really depends on your experience and interests.
 
If this is you first trad build  - or you have only limited experience - then David's suggestion above is an excellent one. The Webbit is whats known as a "short kit" so you just get the wood for the main parts basically but laser cut. You would have to add a small amount of sheet and strip balsa to finish it. The advantage of going down this route is you will building the model alonside lots of other people (some of whom are very experienced) so lots of encrouragement and advice available.
 
If you already have build experience then it really depends on what your flying interests are, how big a model you want, and how much you want to spend! Trad kits range from the small inexpensive end of things produced by outfits like West Wings for about £40, through middle of the road companies making scale and sport models for about £150 such as DBSportandScale all the way to "how big is your cheque book with Mick Reeves Models and BalsaUSA. And lots of others beside. Take your pick! Take a look in the trad build topics on here and see qiite a range.
 
BEB
Peter Miller11/01/2011 10:45:25
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Not Plaster board. Insulation board this is like 1/2" thick, very very soft cardboard. Buy an 8X 4 sheet and you can keep some to repalce it when it gets worn/dirty etc.
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator11/01/2011 11:25:52
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We'll get loads of posts now from all the plasterboard fans
 
BEB
kc11/01/2011 12:13:00
6520 forum posts
173 photos
Well plasterboard works very well and for most models a piece 4 ft by 18 inches is all you need plus a few smaller bits for tailplane and fins.  Then you can put them aside whilst working on something else.  Plasterboard is fine if stood upright or on something flat.  Left at an angle it can sag.  It takes pins easily and better than that it can take screws to hold down the spars tightly.   Use chipboard screws with sharp points and a tiny piece of ply.  Make sure the screws are in a place that will not be sheeted over!
The best bit is it can be free.......builders just scrap pieces much bigger than we need so look for them throwing it in a skip.  
Terence Lynock11/01/2011 12:14:56
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What I like about the B&Q pink foam is its stable regardless of humidity or temperature, you can drive pins right in as far as you want and it is easy to move around, if your short of space you can even hang it on the wall.
Richard V-D11/01/2011 13:23:01
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@Terence.
 
What is this pink foam of which you speak?  I've had a look on their website and can't find it.  I'm thinking it is insulation of some sort?
 

Erfolg11/01/2011 13:50:39
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11750 forum posts
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Confession time.
 
I had a building board which I had used for years, with one major drawback, I had great difficulty with getting pins into it, this was chip board (resin bound, natural face).
 
When i restarted modelling possibly 5 years back now, I decided this was not good enough. I spotted an old rectangular largish coffee table top in my mothers garage, I commandeered this. It was made from plywood and had some nice reinforcement underneath.
 
All was fine, but it was a bit small.
 
So to supplement it I found a 22mm ply wood of cut, in the local wood yard, I paid £1 for it. It was great I thought, ply wood is stable is it not. After building my first wing, I thought this is not perfectly flat. So back on the board the panels went, yes they are. I then thought no they are not, ohh yes they are.
 
I then took out my engineers 1m steel rule. Placing it on the board I quickly could see, it had a 20-40 thou bow end to end. Across it was flat.
 
Now i did like the plywood it had a certain gravitas and feel of quality. So what to do?
 
I decided that what i needed to do was get a flat piece and reinforce it like the an Engineers surface Table or Plate. So out of curiosity I decided to use some 75mm deep * 20mm wide wood to see what would happen to the existing board. Surprisingly, to me, I found it pulled flat. So I then glued and screwed these re-enforcements to the ply. Whilst i was at, I decided that a proper building jig was in order for bodies,which was done at the same time.
 
You will see both of these arrangements in many of my postings.
 
I hesitate to recommended the approach, as it is heavy and bulky, but they are both flat. Perhaps not in engineering terms, but in wood working view point at least adequate. 
John Tee11/01/2011 15:18:34
858 forum posts
65 photos
I'm currently building a small rubber powered model on a "cork" notice board from Staples. Reinforced the back with hard 3mm balsa 100mm wide, nice and firm. covered the plan with cling film. When I took the tailplane off  the plan found the cyano i used had found it's way through the film and stuck to the plan. I wasn't that heavy with the cyano but it had found its way throught he pin holes where nthe pins held the wood to the plan.
I'm used to using such small section wood - (1/16th strip).
 
John
 
kc11/01/2011 20:35:36
6520 forum posts
173 photos
There must be some ply that is better than others,  my building boards ( pre plasterboard  ) were 1/2 ply with grain across the short side of a 12 inch by 48 inch board.  Stayed flat for 26 years, same with a drawing board from 1957!
1/4 Birch ply in 4 inch by 24 inch bought for formers kept in the same conditions warped in a few months.
 
I would prefer to use MDF and use 75mm inch by 18mm strips to reinforce underneath rather than solid timber.   Use the machine cut edges which are very straight.  Alternatively use recycled wood from scrap furniture which has been indoors with central heating for decades.

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