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Any ideas about how to fix this?

I've gone and been an idiot.

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birdy24/04/2011 11:53:11
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Now, I have finally got around to building the wing of Mr. Miller's Harmony, I've just stuck on the top sheeting and removed the washout wedges. Then I checked, as instructed, that the washout is equal.
 
That is when I realise that I've just built negative washout into one of the wings (). Now I thought that the best way of fixing this would be to remove the top sheeting, but I seemed to have glued that on quite well, so if I do It'll mean destroying it. Any good Ideas before I try doing that? 

Edited By birdy on 24/04/2011 11:57:54

Alan Cantwell24/04/2011 11:54:39
3039 forum posts
erm, fix wot?
Dave Potter24/04/2011 11:56:21
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Try again birdy. We can't fix what we can't see.
David Gilder24/04/2011 11:56:58
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Easy to fix empty spaces...
 
Put something in it!!!!
 
 
Hee hee hee hee!!!!
 
birdy24/04/2011 11:58:31
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Sorry, hit that enter instead of Tab
Alan Cantwell24/04/2011 13:00:37
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come on then, gerrit SORTED,
Bob Cotsford24/04/2011 18:57:28
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sight unseen - you have given it washin instead of washout, you could try damping the top sheet with a dilute ammonia solution and pin it down with the correct washout while it dries.
 
who knows, it might work.
I think I would probably just put it down to a lesson learned and build another wing.

Edited By Bob Cotsford on 24/04/2011 18:57:56

Steve W-O24/04/2011 19:34:54
2775 forum posts
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Use a steamer, one of those stupid things they sell on TV saying it will clean your house.
 
They work very well on balsa, weight it past the position you want to go, and steam it top and bottom, then leave it for a few days, take the weights off, and after a few more days you will see if you need to go further.
 
I imagine a wallpaper remover would work to.
Alan Cantwell24/04/2011 20:13:57
3039 forum posts
EASY PEASY, i take it the wing is sheeted? make a series of cuts through the sheeting, at 45 degrees, this will take the torsional strength out of the sheeting, weight it down, prop up the wing tip trailing edge, this will close the gaps up left by the knife, glue the knife cuts with ALIPHATIC RESIN, this stuff sands, if you cannot get enough washout, then make the knife slots wider, works every time
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator24/04/2011 20:27:55
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Clever idea. Though I'll try to avoid needing it
 
BEB
birdy24/04/2011 21:07:33
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Good plan Alan. I'll try that - even if it doesn't work then the sheeting would be ruined anyway... It seems the simplest idea, but thanks anyone who suggested anything.
Alan Cantwell24/04/2011 21:13:27
3039 forum posts
it not my idea, it belongs elswhere, but its nice to pass on these tips, innit done it twice, works well, just watch the knife near the mainspar, and use a keen blade
birdy25/04/2011 19:53:28
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Done that and I think its worked. Thanks again. So much easier then cutting it off...
Alan Cantwell25/04/2011 20:04:20
3039 forum posts
just make sure you have given the glue time to go off, and both sides are relexed up the same amount
Peter Miller26/04/2011 18:15:37
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Sorry that I missed this when it was posted.
 
Cutting the sheet at 45 degrees was not a good idea. it weakens it too much. You could have done it by simply making several slits along the grain top and bottom and then pinning it down with the washout and running CA into the top slits. Pick it up and making sure that the washout is still in put CA in the slits in the underside.
 
How did you manage to insert the wedges from the front or did you put the thicker one in at the root.
Erfolg26/04/2011 18:31:29
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Hmm
 
I have a model which has the wing built flat, the model is prone to tip stalling and flicking out during loops.
 
It would benefit from some washout. The wing is fully sheeted, will slitting top and bottom skins work?
 
It will save me building a new wing, or just leaving the model as a hanger queen.
Tom Sharp 226/04/2011 18:31:56
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this thread clearly shows the error of not buying ARTF
 
 
 
 
 
Tom Wright 226/04/2011 18:45:33
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Posted by Tom Sharp 2 on 26/04/2011 18:31:56:
this thread clearly shows the error of not buying ARTF
 
 
 
 
 
Och.........
 
TW2.
Peter Miller26/04/2011 19:21:27
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Erfolg
 
Yes, you can get washout by slitting the sheet lengthwise as described.
 
This thread does NOT show the error of not buying ARTF . It shows the error of not reading the instructions properly and building as they were meant to be.
 
I have seen more ARTFs that wanted to crash or that have come to pieces in the air than I have ever seen of models built properly that showed the same tendencies.
 
Such as the Kyosho CAP 232 that had the wing with the maximum curvature on the underside. NO, not a an assmebly mistake It was designed that way and that model was notrious for spinning in. Or the Kyosho Spitfires tha regulalry lost half a tailplane...including two of the demo team that lost them at Sandown.
 
Then there was the manufatcurer that bproduced a range of semi scale models that were all lethal to fly. I saw three of them and they all spun in. Some twice after rebuilding. On this very forum someone asked Is there &&&&&&&&& model that actually flies.
 
I believe that they have improved since then.
 
I will make no comment on the original remark...I think it is obvious.
Alan Cantwell26/04/2011 19:28:59
3039 forum posts
Posted by Peter Miller on 26/04/2011 18:15:37:
Sorry that I missed this when it was posted.
 
Cutting the sheet at 45 degrees was not a good idea. it weakens it too much. You could have done it by simply making several slits along the grain top and bottom and then pinning it down with the washout and running CA into the top slits. Pick it up and making sure that the washout is still in put CA in the slits in the underside.
 
How did you manage to insert the wedges from the front or did you put the thicker one in at the root.

there is an 88 " span mustang with a 3w 60cc fitted, which will certainly disagree with you, it works, and works well the glue is stronger than the wood, the angled cut spreads the load down the wing, one cut overlaps another, therefore, the glue strengthens the next slit, using cyno is a bad thing on any sheeting join, it does not sand, the glue i mentioned sands readliy, we have only cut the top sheeting, thinking about it, would cutting the sheet the opposite angle on the bottom help the process, or hinder it? would both slits close up? if both sides where cut the same way, would the bottom ones open up??? our wing, i might add, felt superbly strong, its covered in profilm,

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