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windy decisions

wind handling

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fly boy301/05/2011 21:14:41
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When accertaining which model will cope with the wind better, which one of these two would be most suitable. The weight of the model or the wing loading. cheers
James4001/05/2011 21:24:21
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I think a high wing loading will work against you in high winds, especially on the downwind to base leg turn when you'd be travelling quite fast to maintain airspeed over the wing, try and slow her down and it's going to stall in that turn!
 
 
Eric Bray01/05/2011 21:29:42
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More significant would be the TYPE of model! A scale pylon racer or modern aerobat would be better than a scale bipe at penetrating the wind, and coping with turbulence.
On top of the heap, though, is the pilot. Are YOU capable of controlling a model in severe conditions?
If you have only flown in fairly light breezes, and then try to fly in half a gale, you are in for a surprise!
Martin Harris01/05/2011 21:31:39
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Conventional wisdom would be a high wing loading coupled with responsive controls but my first choice in gusty turbulence where few others bother to fly is always an EPP 3D profile model which has a low wing loading but extremely good power to weight and exceedingly responsive controls.
 
It also tends to bounce when I get it wrong and sticks back together very easily on the odd occasion when it doesn't!
 
Model weight is irrelevent as the wing loading depends on the wing area.
Martin Harris01/05/2011 21:34:20
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Posted by James40 on 01/05/2011 21:24:21:
I think a high wing loading will work against you in high winds, especially on the downwind to base leg turn when you'd be travelling quite fast to maintain airspeed over the wing, try and slow her down and it's going to stall in that turn!
 
 

Don't let's get started on that one James...but do look for a few threads on downwind turns!

John Privett01/05/2011 21:57:35
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Posted by Martin Harris on 01/05/2011 21:34:20:
Posted by James40 on 01/05/2011 21:24:21:
I think a high wing loading will work against you in high winds, especially on the downwind to base leg turn when you'd be travelling quite fast to maintain airspeed over the wing, try and slow her down and it's going to stall in that turn!
 
 

Don't let's get started on that one James...but do look for a few threads on downwind turns!

 
Martin, I started to type a very similar reply, but was interrupted by a phone call... You sneaked in and beat me to it!
Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator01/05/2011 22:16:28
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I actually favour a model with a higher wing loading in the wind. It flies fast and as Eric says gives good wind penetration. For me, the last thing I want is something that acts like a kite and low wing loading models tend to have that problem in the wind.
 
Something else Eric said is also important - the pilot. Too many people fail to take account of the wind in their flying style. On a windy day its no good closing the throttle on the base leg and planning to glide in. Under these conditions you've got to fly it right down to the ground - power on all the way down, using the engine to control your rate of sink (reacting quickly to gusts) and your elevator to control your speed - keeping it fairly fast. Also its in the wind that your rudder really comes into its own on landing approach (and indeed in much of the rest of the flight). So throttle and rudder are busy in windy conditions. If you're the sort of pilot who could take his hand off the left stick for most of the flight then flying in the wind is just not for you yet - with any sort of model!
 
BEB

Edited By Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator on 01/05/2011 22:19:04

Chris Bott - Moderator01/05/2011 22:31:15
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There's nothing like a few slope soaring sessions in a good blow to sharpen up your reflexes for flying in wind. I just wish I had the opportunity to get out there and do it.
Martin Harris01/05/2011 22:37:26
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Very often, it's wind direction rather than strength that influences my choice of model. BEB's words are up to his usual standard of wisdom and if your site isn't too closely surrounded by turbulence generators I'd go along with his advice.
 
I was quite happily flying a DH60 a couple of weeks ago (admittedly a reasonably heavy veneered foam winged example) when most of my clubmates had got fed up with the half gale conditions and gone to the pub and the wind had moderated only slightly - but this was in a wind direction that doesn't produce much turbulence so I think that shows that it's not purely model choice, as BEB says.
birdy01/05/2011 23:15:54
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One the model is up I tend to find it is best to have something fast. The main problem for me is usually the wind direction and the trees the wind comes over; Because of this I tend to use something easily hand-launchable and something which won't break when the turbulence/ cross wind gets the better of me on landing...
fly boy302/05/2011 15:00:15
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Thanks to all for your input ,most enlightening.For Eric,yes I have flown in more than a breeze many times. The take off and the flying is as you suggest,a challenge.My problem is in the landing and trying to cope with gusts and wind direction changes. Once or twice landings in strong winds have been good, only to have the model blown over on to its back by gusts. Cheers. PS I still love this hobby.
Tom Wright 202/05/2011 17:58:19
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Posted by Martin Harris on 01/05/2011 21:34:20:
Posted by James40 on 01/05/2011 21:24:21:
I think a high wing loading will work against you in high winds, especially on the downwind to base leg turn when you'd be travelling quite fast to maintain airspeed over the wing, try and slow her down and it's going to stall in that turn!
 
 

Don't let's get started on that one James...but do look for a few threads on downwind turns!

Total agreement Martin with your 21-31-39 and above.
 
TW2.

Edited By tom wright 2 on 02/05/2011 18:01:53

Alan Bahia02/05/2011 18:21:01
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hummmm.... you may like to cheat ))) ... have a look on FY-20A (stabilization system)... if you have trouble to land in wind that may help....why not?
 
I use the system to teach my nephew even though we use a body box. When the wind conditions are not that good he can fly with the system on or off... doesn't matter.... with the system on I don't need to take over from time-to-time but the system is key when comes to land and he is so grateful to do himself! by the way he is only 7 years old and do not come offence to the club... so the system makes a great day out for him!
 
I have the system on my Wot4 and and I can turn off, 3D mode or just stabilization.... so... you decide what you want! You need a spare channel for it.
 
By the way the system it's no cheap but maybe cheaper than to buy another kit.
 
Some people in the club is loving the idea as they have some sake hands sickness and it may help some to go back flying and having a happy landing!
 
Just a thought!
 
Cheers,
 
 
fly boy302/05/2011 20:57:04
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Nice one Alan. Now if I could just persuade my fly ing club to invest in that system, it would be a bonus to all. But very useful to learners of all ages. Personally I would not class this as cheating, any thing that can help you become a better flier will be a good thing. Thanks for the info. Good luck to your learner nephew. Cheers FB3
Eric Bray03/05/2011 11:22:52
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Regarding the model blowing over AFTER landing, I tend to shove in full down ele, and hold it in, assuming the model is facing the breeze (more or less) that way the tail end will lift in gusts, before the mainplane, so shoving the model down, rather than picking it up.
Obviously, if you have ended up tail to wind, (unlikely) full UP ele will lift the tail, and hold the model down until you can rescue it.
I also 'park' my models, facing into wind, and with full down ele held in while the RX is switched off, for the same reason.
Depending on the turbulence level, and wind-speed, you might have to 'fly' your model., while it is stationary on the ground, until you can retrieve it and place it safely in the pits, holding in down ele, and using the ailerons to keep the wings level.

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