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2.4gHz UK/France

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Barrie Dav 209/07/2011 10:02:15
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A friend of mine thinks that 2.4gHz transmitters purchased in the UK can't be used in France. It's a long shot but does anyone know the truth.
Martin Harris09/07/2011 10:14:14
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I understand that France only allows part of the 2.4 GHz band to be used. Some manufacturers have a setting which limits the bandwidth to the French specification so I don't see why those couldn't be used legally.
Barrie Dav 209/07/2011 10:24:42
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Thanks Martin.
 
Josip Vrandecic -Mes09/07/2011 19:03:01
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Bonsoir Barrie,your friend's opinion makes sense....example;The menu of tx Futaba T8FG,contains something the above mentioned question...in fact, when you choosing the frequency, (linkage menu-freq.) you can set up- FRANCE -(under GENERAL).....and than fly legally......accros the whole of France....
Je veux avoir du plaisir (have fun)
Jo.

Edited By Josip Vrandecic -Mess on 09/07/2011 19:04:18

Grasshopper09/07/2011 19:26:21
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Yes, true - but read on!
 
I live - and fly in France and as Martin has said you have to program the Tx for French regs. In the case of a Multiplex Cockpit SX - 2.4 GHz version, there is a menu which allows simple selection of French or 'other' setting. I imagine for other Tx makes the same goes.
 
To quote the Multiplex manual:
 
Before the M-LINK system can be used in particular countries
it is essential to activate the reduced frequency
range permitted in the region concerned
 
If you want the detail then here it is.

UK range of frequencies
2.4000 GHz – 2.4835 GHz
 
Restricted frequency range - i.e. France
2.4000 GHz – 2.4540 GHz
 
In fact the limitation in available bandwidth (number of channels) is small and will not be obvious unless you are operating in an extremely congested air space.
 
Peter
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Privett09/07/2011 19:42:22
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It's quite a peculiar restriction, and unique as far as I'm aware to France. To quote the FFAM (french equivalent of the BMFA);
 
Application à tous types de modèles réduits

2 400 MHz à 2483,5 MHz

la limite supérieure autorisée en puissance par la norme est de 100 mW avec une limitation en France à 10 mW sur la partie supérieure de la bande ( 2454 à 2483,5 MHz pour un usage à l'extérieur de bâtiments ( limitation qui n'existe pas rn vol d'intérieur)
 
So, to put that into English!
This applies to all types of models, the band is from 2400MHz to 2483.5MHz.
BUT - whilst most of the band can be used with a power limit of 100mW, the upper part of the band from 2454 to 2483.5MHz is restricted to only 10mW when used outdoors. If used indoors then the whole band can be used at 100mW!
 
Pete B - Moderator09/07/2011 19:43:27
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Spektrum also have a French setting in the menu. I had an earlier DX6i, which HH re-programmed to include the bandwidth FOC.
 
The reason for the restriction is that some French military equipment currently uses the upper part of the band. The equipment will be taken out of use in 2012, when the full band will be available to modellers.
 
Pete
John Privett09/07/2011 20:38:21
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Thanks for the explanation Pete! I had something like that in the back of my mind, but couldn't recall the actual details.
 
There's a similar issue with 35MHz in France too. Until 2 or 3 years ago the "European standard" 35MHZ wasn't available at all in France. Eventually the first two 35MHz frequencies were legalised for model control (in about 2008?) with a vague promise that the rest of the band would gradually become available as existing users were moved off it. I think the existing users were the french railways - Pete can probably confirm or correct me on that! I guess by the time (if it ever happens) the whole 35MHz becomes available in France there will be nobody wanting to use it...
Pete B - Moderator09/07/2011 22:45:18
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The only 35MHz frequencies available here are 35.000 and 35.010, reserved for aero use. I believe this is below the UK band which is a bit annoying if anyone fancies bringing a model on holiday!.

Most MHz fliers seem to be on 40-41Mhz, with some frequencies reserved for aero use but the majority, including the 26-27MHz and 72MHz bands, are available for land and boat models as well.

There's a link to the FFAM (BMFA equivalent) site here which lists the frequencies if anyone is interested. Don't worry, it's the Google translation...........

Pete
John Privett10/07/2011 01:11:30
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Pete - 35.000 and 35.010 are channels 60 & 61 which are perfectly legal in the UK.
 
They are the lowest two frequencies in the "standard" 35MHz band, though in the UK we gained an extra 5 or 6 frequencies below that (plus a similar number at the top end too) a few years ago which are probably not legal in most other European countries.
Barrie Dav 210/07/2011 08:08:11
1012 forum posts
14 photos
Thank you all gentlemen. The regulations, whilst somewhat complicated, are clear.
 
I bought my gear over here in France, mainly because if a fault appeared it would be easier to rectify locally. However, I was advised by the UK importer that a Futaba FF7 2.4GHz bought in the UK would be legal here. A well trained guy!!

Edited By Barrie Dav 2 on 10/07/2011 08:09:07

Grasshopper10/07/2011 08:13:52
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35 MHz in France - YES!
 
I live and fly in Brittany and fly 35 MHz channel 61 at all times. I have never met a French flyer on 35 MHz as they all either fly/flew 40/41 MHz or are rushing onto 2.4 GHz. I have no need of the latter and have the 'channel check' in my Cockpit SX to act as a backup in case any of you UK flyers should venture out this way.
 
Peter

Edited By Grasshopper on 10/07/2011 08:14:19

Tom Sharp 210/07/2011 09:07:19
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The 2.4 ghz plug in module on my Futaba FF9 has a switch on it marked, General or France.
 
 
 
 
 
Brian Hilton Fly in France19/01/2012 04:29:15
7 forum posts

Hi

Most of what has been said above is correct, if you want the latest on the situation then visit

www.flyinfrance.com


Brian Hilton

Fly in France

Ernie19/01/2012 09:24:30
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Hi all, I'd be very careful on 35 in France. It's true that no one uses it for flying, but the police do use it. I suppose it would be OK far from civilisation, but, but, I had big problems when I tried it at a small aeroport
My cheapie Futaba tranny has a wee switch inside, which makes it Frannce friendly
 
ernie
Grasshopper19/01/2012 11:40:33
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Living and flying in France - I have used 35 MHz channel 61 for several years - at least once a week and have never had radio problems.
The French take legislation such as this very seriously and I feel certain that if channels 60 and 61 are 'permitted' for model control then the police system whatever it is will be clear of that band.
I fly from a small airport alongside a dual carriage way and 2 Km from a big town - and never a glitch!
 
Peter
John Privett19/01/2012 23:06:00
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Since I last posted on this six months ago, the 35MHz band in France has grown. Now frequencies from 35.000 to 35.050MHz (channels 60, 61, 62, 63, 64 & 65) are legal, and reserved for model aircraft only.

Edited By John Privett on 19/01/2012 23:06:41

Grasshopper20/01/2012 08:55:50
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Thanks John - yes it's all good news if, like me you live and fly in France.
 
Everyone else is/was on 40/41 MHz and are gradually going to 2.4 GHz.
No-one would even dream of buying a 35 MHz radio so the airwaves are well and truly clear for us ex-UK aero-modellers
 
Peter
Brian Hilton Fly in France20/01/2012 16:08:03
7 forum posts
Just to clarify a couple of points raised. As Peter has pointed out the French are very serious about such legislation so Ernie's comment made me raise my eyebrows! I am also very concerned about advice on a number of other websites and forums that is factually totally incorrect!
 
When starting the Fly in France project strangely I did a lot of research in to this before investing a substantial amount of money!

I spoke with a number of Radio suppliers in Europe in 2003, non of whom were aware that the European regulations were changing to harmonize the European frequency use. The relevant legislation dates back to 1999.

I have over the years seen many comments for the user of 35mHz in France, illegal CB radio, police, the military and a few more so to clarify the previous user of 35mHz was the DIR, The DIR is the " directions interdépartementales des routes" which is responsible for road maintenance and used the frequency for walkie talkies and inter vehicle communications. The delay to releasing the 35mHz band was due to the DIR investing 15 million Euro in new equipment in 2005 as they were unaware of the changes! This lead the French government to apply to the European parliment for a special exclusion! Since 2006 steps have been taken to reduce the use, originally just channels 60 & 61were available from 2007 and as of June 2011 60 to 65 are available for model aircraft exclusively. I ran a 35mHz scanner for several periods of time and never saw so much as a blip on the entire spectrum!

 
French modellers were less than enthusiastic about the switch it meant investing in new or updating existing equipment for no benefit, the change to 2.4gHz is a very much different story!

So what of the future?

Over time the French aero modellers will lose the 41mHz band and 35mHz frequencies will become increased to comply with the European regulations which is good for us as I can't imagine many French going down the 35mHz route.

The military were due to cease the use of 2.4 by 31st December 2011 and probably have done so. The removal of the power restrictions on the upper half of 2.4 band have not as yet been lifted but are due to be soon, this is however France and bureaucracy is riff as the fellow ex-pats are no doubt willing to confirm!

The European F3A Championship is due to take place at Chateauroux at the end of June, about 60km from Fly in France, here is a link to there website for their stance on the situation in English.

 
For updated information as I get it follow the following link
 
From this page is a link to the FFAM website, but it is all in French and several articles contradict others!
 
Hopefully this clears up the situation as well as can be done so at the moment.
Brian

Edited By brian hilton on 20/01/2012 16:20:06

Edited By brian hilton on 20/01/2012 16:24:23

Ernie22/01/2012 09:49:00
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Hi Guys
 
French serious about legislation...mon dieu. They certainly make lots of rules, and have drawers full of rubber stamps, but, but, they ignore them..... why? "because I'm French" they say....Liberty, Fraternity, and all that stuff
They still smoke in cafés, park on yellow lines...They ride bikes without lights and brakes, motos without silencers, and nobody bothers. A friend has a still in his shed, but they are very very good at turning a blind eye. Thats one of the reasons why I'm here.
 
I can only relate my own experiences...When I arrived here , many years ago, all the lads that I knew were on 41.........35 was the legal frequency for Europe, but the police in france were using it (illegally) so the lads stayed on 41 (illegally) but everyone was happy (legally)
 
I duly arrived at the local patch with my cougar ( an ultra reliable set up with hundreds of trouble free forays) It was on 35, so all the guys landed to watch the fun and off I went.
It was all as normal so I handed it to a good friend of mine, a fine flyer of zillions of years experience (Hi Colin)
So, Colins got that big smile, but only for a couple of minutes...He thrusts the tranny to me...everythings wrong, chaos ensues and a well written off fun flyer.
 
Now, It could be pilot error, but not Colin in that situation, It could be a teckie failure, probably not in a well maintained, tested machine.......So I put it to a passing police car
 
Fortunately, 2.4 came along, and now we're all just fine (legally)
 
But, no chances.....oui
 
ernie

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