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Electric RTF For Learner...Advice Please

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Dale Gibson08/08/2012 21:57:13
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123 forum posts
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Hi guys,

Ok, I'll admit to becoming a tad obsessed with this hobby and please tell me if I'm on the wrong track here. I have joined a club and have my IC trainer but with the recent bad weather etc. I'm not getting as much stick time as I'd like.....I live in the middle of nowhere and have spoken to a local farmer and he has no problem with me flying an electric plane on the fields around me.....I have BMFA insurance.

Is there a RTF leccy trainer out there that would be suitable.....my thinking is I could just go out in the field and have a go at a moments notice depending on the weather.....and yes I fully accept the fact that I will bump it here and there but it's a bit frustrating at the moment.....

Thanks.....Dale

Rusty C08/08/2012 22:05:31
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http://www.sussex-model-centre.co.uk/shopexd.asp?id=32826     St model's Discovery Is good start, I would be your own Spektrum DX6i for it, this radio will be good for many models to come.

Good luck mate

Rusty

Edited By Rusty C on 08/08/2012 22:05:59

Biggles' Elder Brother - Moderator08/08/2012 22:27:49
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The Multiplex FunCub is another popular choice. Easy to fly, very robust.

The Multiplex EastStar is also a good candidate.

BEB

PS Not on commission from Multiplex honest - but they do tend to make good, reliable, robust learners electric powered models!

JohnSom08/08/2012 22:30:32
88 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Dale

I would endorse Rusty's recommendation about the ST Discovery. Providing you get the CofG in the correct position it's an ideal trainer and also happens to be excellent value for money.

John

Chris Bott - Moderator08/08/2012 22:32:28
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I Agree, Multiplex models fly very well, are very forgiving and will take a lot of punishment when things go a bit wrong.

The Multiplex Menor is very much like an IC trainer. So will be similar to fly which should help.

Rusty C08/08/2012 22:57:58
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452 forum posts
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I also like the mentor, Multiplex stuff is good gear in general. There is often too much to choose from out there now crook I would say go with the most affordable, also consider spare parts availability for when things get bumpy.

And dont forget to have fun!

rusty

Ponty Bri08/08/2012 23:00:46
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71 forum posts

As a newbie returnee to the hobby I have purchased a Discovery and a Spektrum 6 channel set up. The plane flies well although a little light so needs to be flown on calmer days. I have found that a good simulator is fun and helps you to master the controls without breaking real models. I have bought the Phoenix simulator and it is addictive especially when the weather outside is grim.

Brian

Alwyn Gee08/08/2012 23:32:05
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194 forum posts
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You can't do better than a Seagull E Poineer as an electric trainer. Whilst it is not RTF it is ARTF and the airframe totally bolts together, (no icky sticky stuff required.) Most reputable LHS will supply you with the airframe and a power train to match then just add servos.

It is a great 40 sized trainer with excellent flying manners and will fly in a good blow too. I passed my bronze (A cert. in the southlands) with this in a howling hooly huricane. smiley Plus at 61" span it's easy to see in the air. And I saved the best bit till last, the airframe is under £80.00 in most outlets.

Have fun
Alwyn

JohnSom09/08/2012 06:23:22
88 forum posts
7 photos

Whilst I would agree that the Multiplex models are excellent, in fact I am just completing a Fun Cub, there are two other factors of particular importance to the newbie. First is cost. A multiplex Mentor is over £200 to get in the air. Whilst savings can be made on the electrics this requires a fair amount of knowledge normally beyond that of someone new to the pastime. The Discovery costs about half that amount and with the high risk factor during the early days of learning to fly makes better financial sense.

Secondly, if I recall correctly, the Discovery comes with all servos and electrics already in place. It simply requires the installation of the receiver to complete. This must be of considerable help to anyone new to rc.

Although Dale plans to fly on his own to gain some experience I would strongly urge him to have his new plane checked out and trimmed by one of his more experienced club members before flying on his own in the farmers field.

John

Dale Gibson09/08/2012 14:38:18
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123 forum posts
26 photos

Thank you for your suggestions guys, am looking into them......thumbs up

NigelH09/08/2012 16:58:58
891 forum posts
1 photos

E-Flite Alpha Sport 450 ?

Concorde Speedbird09/08/2012 17:09:13
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Well this may be a bit too advanced, but a Foam E Wot 4? Put the rates very low and it is as docile as a duck (are ducks docile?!). And it is very strong.

Multiplex Minimag is easier to fly, see what others think.

CS

NigelH09/08/2012 19:03:15
891 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by ConcordeSpeedbird on 09/08/2012 17:09:13:

Well this may be a bit too advanced, but a Foam E Wot 4? Put the rates very low and it is as docile as a duck (are ducks docile?!). And it is very strong.

Multiplex Minimag is easier to fly, see what others think.

CS

Indeed. Also, you might want to stop suggesting a Wot 4 every time someone asks what they should buy, regardless of their differing circumstances. One size doesn't fit all.

Concorde Speedbird09/08/2012 19:20:09
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Also, you might want to stop suggesting a Wot 4 every time someone asks what they should buy, regardless of their differing circumstances. One size doesn't fit all.

I don't think that is fair. I don't have much experience, so if someone is asking for a Warbird or a scale subject I keep out and don't post. I post in the threads where I do have knowledge and experience, mostly sports hack planes. And then, I almost always suggest the SLEC Funfly anyway!

The Wot 4 is undoubtly a great design. Suggesting it to others may lead to them going out and getting one and then having many fun and happy flying hours with a strong, versatile and brilliant flying aeroplane.

What's wrong with that? Why should I suggest other airframes which I consider inferior? And I always suggest another plane, in this case the Multiplex Minimag, another aeroplane which I have owned and enjoyed.

CS

NigelH09/08/2012 19:30:08
891 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by ConcordeSpeedbird on 09/08/2012 19:20:09:

Also, you might want to stop suggesting a Wot 4 every time someone asks what they should buy, regardless of their differing circumstances. One size doesn't fit all.

The Wot 4 is undoubtly a great design. Suggesting it to others may lead to them going out and getting one and then having many fun and happy flying hours with a strong, versatile and brilliant flying aeroplane.

The problem with that is they may also buy one and then smack it into the floor because they're not ready for it.

Money wasted. Deflated.

The Wot 4 Foam-E isn't a 'leccy trainer' as mentioned by the OP.

Concorde Speedbird09/08/2012 19:37:31
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2735 forum posts
650 photos

On low rates the Foam E Wot 4 is very docile and forgiving, I've tried it, and remember I also suggested the Minimag, which is right for the job. I was not happy about you saying to stop suggesting Wot 4s a lot, anyway let's stop this, it is clogging this guy's thread.

Dale, here's the Minimag by the way. This may also be of interest.

CS

Robin Kearney09/08/2012 21:39:46
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1081 forum posts
183 photos

Dale, BEB said it earlier, and I'll second it: The Multiplex Easystar (now version 2 I believe) don't underestimate the amount of punishment it can take with that pusher configuration. It basically means anything ( within reason) you do to the nose in a heavy arrival won't effect the flying performance.

r.
NigelH09/08/2012 22:42:26
891 forum posts
1 photos

I'm far from being a beginner but I've been thinking about getting a HK Bixler, which I guess is a clone of the Easystar, for those times when it's a bit windy or the grass is too long and I don't want to fly a more valuable balsa model. I've ordered one of those 3-axis stabilisers. They could make a good pair for those all too frequent windy days.

Simon Chambers10/08/2012 00:31:39
789 forum posts
42 photos

Hi Dale.

If your a relatively fresh, new beginner and going to fly by yourself, get either a Multiplex EasyStar or a Hobbyking Bixler. Both great airframes.

EasyStar more expensive, but better quality. Bixler has more in the box for a lot cheaper.

Don't get a Wot4 Foam-E until your fairly proficient. They do make a very good trainer, however from experience watching other guys learn in our club the flat wing section makes it tricky to handle in turns and has no self righting characteristics.

Also the Easystar and Bixler survive much better in a crash (most usually nose in for beginners), than the Wot4 Foam-E. This is for many reasons, such as the motor location, tail surfaces up away from the ground if hit hard and they're made from great slab chunks of foam. So if it does hit the ground hard, the foam makes a great impact absorber.

Also don't dismiss the often now forgotten Multiplex Twinstar 2 either. I originally cut my teeth with one, and they make a super aircraft to learn on. Gentle to fly, big enough to see and built very tough. The stock 400 brushed can motors are plenty powerful enough to learn with. I still get mine out every so often and have a great lot of fun with it.

The Multiplex Minimag is ok (I have one and still got it too), however I'd say its a bit small for learning on for my liking. Also requires a brushless setup to be useful, which is either fiddle to spec and fit, or if you go for the official Multiplex setup - very expensive.

After a gap of a couple of years, I came back in to flying and I learnt on a Wot4 Foam-E. Great to learn on, and it can be a trainer, however as a beginner, its not trivial to fly. Like I said above, its a popular trainer in our club, however some really do struggle with it - and that's with a guiding hand next to them, ready to jump in and help if things go a bit astray.

One final thing. All these foam models can be readily glued back together with either Cyano, or Epoxy. If you slam it in to the ground hard and misshape the foam, dunk it into very hot water for a minute or so and watch it regain back to its original shape!

Have fun with what ever you choose!

Cheers,

Si.

Edited By Simon Chambers on 10/08/2012 00:32:07

Simon Chambers10/08/2012 00:33:39
789 forum posts
42 photos

Just had an additional thought.

Bit of a curb ball choice: The Britflight Breeze

Great flying plane, cheap and design+made in Britain! Also piece of cake to glue back together again.

Si.

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