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New Shed

Similar to what BEB did last year, but not.....

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Olly P19/12/2012 10:32:06
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3215 forum posts
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David - thats what a wood pile and chimea is for!

I can manage the conifers i think, but there is a big beast in the back corner - right where one of the sheds is going, which isn't a conifer....

Olly P19/12/2012 16:56:00
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3215 forum posts
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Well, 2 people popping round tomorrow to give me quotes for the big tree!!

Jeff-C19/12/2012 17:33:09
91 forum posts
1 photos

Hi Olly,

Been reading the thread and interested to see what you come up with. I literally just finished having my 'office' installed at the bottom of the garden. Mine too is 4m x 3m. The only thing is that mine has a small 2m X 1m verander at the front. I thought it wouldn't make that much difference, bt had taken a huge chunk out if the internal. Never the less I have just installed a 4m long work bench along the back wall, and starting to it up the shelving to hold the enormous among of stuff that I have!

Are you gong to construct the shed yourself or buy a prefab and build it, or even better get someone else to install it for you!? Waltons seem to be the cheapest if you go down that route.

Olly P20/12/2012 15:55:54
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Jeff - custome designed and built by me. The garden is an odd shape at the back and I will be making the shed to fit it.

First tree quote is £175, waiting for SWMBO to tell me if this is for 1 or more trees...

Olly P21/12/2012 11:34:57
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Well, that was 175 for one tree, second quote was for 220, for the same Hawthorne.

The first quote didn't include stump spraying, the second did, and will probably get the business....

SkippyUK21/12/2012 22:00:28
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287 forum posts
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Ever thought of contacting the local Scout Group about getting rid of the tree(s)?

They might do it for a suitable donation and provides good training for the Scouts.

Just a thought....

Erfolg22/12/2012 17:25:24
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11659 forum posts
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Olly

Although at first sight, a standard shed from a suppliers may seem expensive. In most circumstances it is the most cost effective.

Buying the materials from, wood merchants is in most cases more expensive. Plus you have to design, cut, assemble and finish the structure. Invariably with unforeseen additional costs.

On the other hand, the true costs can be disguised to some degree, if necessary.

I do have misgivings with respect to the trees, invariably harder to deal with effectively, than you hope. Unless you are prepared to pay lots of money. That is money which go to a better shed.

Best of luck which ever way you go.

Edited By Erfolg on 22/12/2012 17:26:24

Olly P27/12/2012 14:20:56
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3215 forum posts
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Well, trees will be going out but shed won't be going in for the foreseeable future due to unexpected work needed on the house....
Erfolg27/12/2012 14:37:06
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Olly

The sad fact is that a house is never, ever, finished. There is always more to do, the list. ever growing longer. You start of in your very early twenties. Forty years later, nothing has changed, aspirations always soaring.

Now being an engineer, you know you need a plan. One which involves a CPA, critically, with the shed on the critical path,yes it automatically elevates shed from the bottom of the programme to such a dependant intrinsically essential item, progress becomes impossible or fraught. You know, hypothetically to store, bags of plaster, cement, critical materials for internal house renovation, where delays and lack of house storage threatens the smooth running of the renovation process.

Olly P08/01/2013 10:17:19
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3215 forum posts
181 photos

Right.

Loft Quote is higher than hoped. Loft now on back burner.

Shed now moving up priority list. Trees are coming out this Sat, for the princely sum of a bottle of port - a family friend is a qualified tree surgeon

The next thing will be the 'hard landscaping' of the rear - i.e. establishing a level and building a retaining wall to hold the surrounding ground back. Given the drop (around 2m/6' I have been advised to get a professional to look at it. I am happy to do the work, and have a few ideas, but need a structural engineer to sign it off if I ever want to be able to sell the house!

Anyone know any?

Olly

Erfolg08/01/2013 11:26:49
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Oh Joy, Olly.

The shed should not just move up the priority list, it should be catapulted to the very top.

The reason why? It is obvious, many of the roles that the loft conversion were intended to undertake, will now be taken on by the shed. Simples.

If it is ground work, is it not a Civil Engineer that you need for advice. I guess avoiding land slip, or buttressed retaining wall issues?

For steel work, can you not do it? I have done my own for a valleyed roof and an opening in a wall on my kitchen extension. The building inspector was useful here, supplying details of the codes where compliance was required. I then obtained the codes and standards from Manchester Central Library.

Considering your loft conversion, can you identify if it is some aspects which were putting up the costs more than anticipated or just a general underestimate of costings. I guess you will have considered breaking the project down into bits, and then manage it yourself, sub contracting packages? Have you constructed a BOM, and costed it? I found that I could get substantial cost reductions by setting up Trade Accounts, getting to know the staff. Unexpectedly, I found a young female accounts manager, was very helpful in giving me a good deal, on packages of timber. I also found that one local branch of Travis Perkins would not give me anything worth while, yet another local branch had no issues in being competitive.

Olly P08/01/2013 11:37:31
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3215 forum posts
181 photos

Indeed - that is why I am now trying to get the info about the retaining walls!

Regards the loft, the increase in price has come about as the loft would need structural members fitting 'lengthwise' in 2 places, the roof then to be braced on the members and the ceilings hung from them. All spanwise timbers to be reinforced to ensure the floor when hung is strong enough (i.e. no cross wise warps between the beams)

The next step is insulation and boarding out, and electrics. Then the general finishing - Which would be DIY - I am capable of rendering!

The only cost which is fixed is the building control element, set by the council. All other costs will depend on the contractor and design. A staircase for example is not cheap, and neither are the required fire doors. We have another specialist loft convertor coming round on Friday evening for a second quote, but we will see.

The loft has to wait until the boiler is done anyway as the current boiler has a header tank, hot water tanks and flue which would be removed for a more modern boiler and would make the whole loft project much more feasable.

The key for that and potentially a cheaper insulation bill is the green deal scheme for which I am awaiting the government to release the assessment software....only 5 months late and counting! I am however on top of a local firm of assessors list of contactees when the software is released - probably at the end of this month....

Olly P15/01/2013 10:02:03
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3215 forum posts
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OK, small trees are out. this was not the priority for saturday but became the priority when the tree surgeon turned up and saw the trees! Therefore the bigger hawthorns will be coming out on the 25th.

I need to hire some ladders to get up them, unless anyone can lend me a 30 ft ladder!

Also had the quote from the landscape gardener, and will be doing the work myself. He clearly didn't listen to what we wanted and the quote was much more than we expected. Once we have finished handing over the old rented house on thuirsday we will sit and draw up what we want to do and I will then cost out doing it myself...

I may be looking for some labour/plant driving assistance in the next month or 2....

Olly P16/01/2013 11:49:47
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3215 forum posts
181 photos

Garden with some of the trees removed:

**LINK**

Olly

bouncebounce crunch16/01/2013 12:04:44
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1739 forum posts
212 photos

Olly I noticed you are on a sloping block. try diverting that water for collection for a vegie/flower patch.

your fence/walls can be used for verticle gardens -hydroponic would seem first choice but organic composting gardens are better.

Been looking again Olly, what are the measurements? grow food, 1/2 Wine barrels can hold citrus trees easily, lettuce, cabbages and their type can be grown in pvc pipes along your fences and there are many ways like modelling to skin a cat. I love cats.

 

Edited By bouncebouncecrunch on 16/01/2013 12:05:12

Edited By bouncebouncecrunch on 16/01/2013 12:13:18

Erfolg16/01/2013 12:24:29
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11659 forum posts
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With respect to your slopping ground, better than a Hyper........ build a work room!

I know it may seem ridiculous, but have you considered having say the back of the workshop on the existing ground, the front being on stilts?

Underneath you could create the perfect environment for hedgehogs or even rats!

Particularly if the removal and stabilisation of the ground is problematic and or expensive?

Olly P16/01/2013 12:48:37
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3215 forum posts
181 photos

The current plan is to bring the rear down to a level with the flat, at the front of the blocks for the sloping section. The problem with a stilt type construction is local planning restrictions on height.

BBC - we do grow food, Tomatoes, apples, cherries, and a variety of herbs etc. We can't do citrus unless we bring in over winter as it is to cold here in the winter!

The water will be held in a water butt for use in the shed....

Olly

bouncebounce crunch16/01/2013 12:54:58
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1739 forum posts
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Olly you and your family are on a great path. some of the great gardens of the world have plants in wheeled tubs for seasonal and germination reasons. indoors for summer shade or winter sun etc.

from blackthumb.

Olly P16/01/2013 13:55:43
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3215 forum posts
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BBC- We have grown food since we got our first rented house!

The plan is that this year will be the 'hard landscaping' and building year, with the green and soft bit to follow next year - the machinery promises to destroy anything we plant this year!

Luther Oswalt26/01/2013 16:50:03
138 forum posts

Olly - Did you get the big tree out? Any problems?

Leo

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