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Switch Repair

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Alan Cardwell 120/01/2013 10:48:37
36 forum posts

Hiya All,

Many thank's for all the reply's to my query regarding unreliability issues with Dx8. I had an accident with my Dx6i and damaged the rudder d/r switch, is this a simple on off switch or is it a different type.

Regards

Alan

John Cole20/01/2013 11:08:42
615 forum posts
24 photos

I would assume it's a 2-way switch. Look inside and see if it has 3 wires attached: common. high and low.

Peter Beeney20/01/2013 13:11:30
1582 forum posts
59 photos

The rate switches I’ve renewed in the past have been standard on/off switches, two wires, but of course a change over switch, three connections, (just use two), will suffice. It’s not difficult to change the switch if it’s just held in the case by it’s bezel nut fixing, but if it’s part of a small PCB it’s a touch more tricky; but if you are able to solder it’s still quite feasible.

I imagine, but this is a complete guess, that there is some sort of variable resistance in series with the stick for low rate, and the switch just shorts it for high rate.

PB

John Cole20/01/2013 13:20:50
615 forum posts
24 photos

Peter: rates controlled by a pot on a "computer" Tx?

WolstonFlyer20/01/2013 13:50:19
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2104 forum posts
189 photos
If you contact HorizonHobbies UK and tell them the problem you will get some form of help.

My son dropped his DX5 and broke two of the switches. I emailed HH and they said I could send them the TX and they would fix the switches for free or they would post me a couple of switches if I was happy to install them myself.

I opted for the latter to save the postage, when the switches arrived it was a simple soldering job with two wires to each switch. The switches were just held in via their bezel thread, no PCB behind them.

I have not had the back off my DX6i but I would say it will be the same 2 wire switches.

Telephone; 01279 641097
E-Mail; sales@horizonhobby.co.uk

Edited By WolstonFlyer on 20/01/2013 13:58:18

Chris Bott - Moderator20/01/2013 14:11:57
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Posted by Peter Beeney on 20/01/2013 13:11:30:

I imagine, but this is a complete guess, that there is some sort of variable resistance in series with the stick for low rate, and the switch just shorts it for high rate.

PB

In a "computer" radio I would suggest that the switch just changes the state (1 or 0) of a digital input to the computer chip. Everything else is done in software.

Peter Beeney20/01/2013 19:44:57
1582 forum posts
59 photos

Yes indeed, I have no idea how it’s done, so then perhaps a better description might be that there is some form of varying the pulse length from the stick which is isolated by the switch? Just my inappropriate choice of words… But I’m not entirely convinced with the 1 or 0 angle, I thought that the 1 was a high condition, a connection to a voltage level, and the 0 was a low level, a connection to the zero volt level, or common. There is also a third possible state, an open circuit, nothing connected. I’d have thought that an on/off switch can only be in one of two states, a connected state, or an open circuit state? Although I suspect the mechanical switch might simply switch an electronic switch on, or off, to do the same thing.

As I so happens, I shall be having an opportunity soon of looking in the back of some Spektrum transmitters, and although it’s a pretty impossible task without any form of circuit diagram, and diagram notes, I’ll see if I can get an inkling of what is going on. But it’s perhaps not that significant anyway, certainly changing the switch is fairly straight forward, which is the main consideration. I’ve often thought that some of the long-lever switches, that tend to stick out of the transmitter a bit, with their lever at it’s weakest point, (narrowest), at the moment point, are particularly vulnerable. I’m sure many of these have been replaced in the past!

PB

Chris Bott - Moderator20/01/2013 19:58:50
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I think you hit the nail on the head with "perhaps not that significant anyway...."

The switch is very likely to have a pull up resistor to the +ve rail and it will connect to, or disconnect from the -ve rail. Thus telling the chip what your choice is. A logic input to the chip if you like.

In software will then mathematically apply either the full travel selected in your endpoint settings or apply a percentage mulitplier as programmed.

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