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Flying from cliffs

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Pete H23/07/2014 17:56:19
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I've just had my first go at flying my zagi from a cliff over the beach below.

It was great fun but I had a problem landing without getting slammed into the ground from about 5ft high when coming in to land.

What is the correct technique?

PatMc23/07/2014 19:32:37
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Come in about 4' 9" lower. teeth 2

John Privett23/07/2014 19:35:52
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Pat, funny you should be the first to answer. On reading Pete's question the first thing that came to my mind was my experience flying off the cliff near the Brierdene car park a few years ago. (That's less than a handful of miles from Pat!)

I'll sit back and see what answers people have to defeating the rotor, because I certainly didn't have any answers that day!

Slopetrashuk23/07/2014 19:54:24
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This largely depends on the shape of the edge of the cliff. With an abrupt edge you can expect some rotor which it sounds like you experienced. You need to walk back from the cliff edge 50 yds or so and try from there.

Andy

GONZO23/07/2014 20:08:04
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When flying off a cliff you need to be about 7 to 9 times the hight of the cliff back from the cliff face before the air starts to smooth out and loose the turbulence generated by the air flowing over the top edge. Or, land at the base of the cliff. Or, find a place along the cliff run where it changes to a round top edge like a hill. This comes from my time hang gliding and not model slope soaring. I've flown many cliffs on a hang glider from Beachy Head to the Tegise Famara cliff run in Lanzarote(2,100ft high) and never landed back on the top of the cliff or met anyone who has. It was only looked upon as an emergency landing option. But then, its a lot more important not to 'trash' yourself than a model.

PatMc23/07/2014 20:20:02
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John, many years ago I used to fly from that car park during my lunch hour when the conditions were right. IIRC I usually landed in the mini golf green back from the rotor.

Pete, sorry I couldn't resist the initial mickey take but it would help if you gave a description &/or location of you flying site for specific meaningful advice to be offered.

If it's unavoidable to land in a rotor affected area I always put in a few clicks of down trim to speed up the approach. This helps maintain positive control all the way until touchdown. IMO more models get broken from cartwheel landings than from fast positive ones.

Slopetrashuk23/07/2014 20:31:08
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Beachy head carries a vicious rotor as the top falls away from the lip compounding the problem. Cliffs such as the Great Orme carry little or no rotor in places where you have to walk slightly downhill to reach the lip. If your site has some higher spot, land there or like i said go further back!
Phil Green23/07/2014 20:57:18
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Filey Brigg (east) has a similar rotor, rather than walk back towards the caravans I just come in faster and stay on the ball ready for the sudden changes of attitude. Sometimes I find its better coming in crosswind, then a tight 90 degrees into wind kills the speed and settles the model down nicely. When you float it in the lower airspeed means you've less control authority. Sometimes the air is still immediately behind the cliff edge, just a few feet back, but then you have to be aware of punters, their dogs, and signs saying "Beware Dangerous Cliff".
All depends on the particular site I spose

img_3813.jpg

 

 

Edited By Phil Green on 23/07/2014 21:01:17

Pete H23/07/2014 21:06:17
71 forum posts
58 photos

That looks just the same as the cliff at West Runton, Norfolk where I'm struggling to land without it looking like a crash.

It sounds like I need to try coming in faster or further back.

West Runton

Edited By Pete H on 23/07/2014 21:11:15

Speedster23/07/2014 21:37:11
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The trick is to walk back until you feel a steady Wind, about 50 meter and land there.

Then there is no problems,

Or if you have flaps you can spot land only 1 meter from the edge, or even land in the lift area..

Good luck
Soren

Speedster07/08/2014 20:31:36
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370 forum posts
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This is the way to do it..
S
kevin b07/08/2014 21:07:39
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Sorry, thought this thread was an advert to a holiday in the Caribbean. Almost had a model and guitar packed !

wink 2

"Got myself a cryin' talkin ..........."

Steve Dorling15/12/2014 22:58:20
41 forum posts
1 articles

Cliff rotor - you have to walk back - a loOOOOOOOOOOONG WAY BACK

PatMc15/12/2014 23:06:22
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Posted by Steve Dorling on 15/12/2014 22:58:26:

Cliff rotor - you have to walk back - a loOOOOOOOOOOONG WAY BACK

Not necessarily. Most times we don't have that option at my local slope & usually land within a few yards of the edge. It's all down to pre-planning & practice. wink 2

Steve Dorling16/12/2014 06:53:15
41 forum posts
1 articles

Can be - but rotors are notoriously unpredictable - you have to learn your hill - if you're a newbie - get walking

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