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fuel proofers

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Phil Winks13/09/2014 21:00:27
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Just a quick question sort of IC related, am I right in thinking that enamel paints and varnishes are glow fuel proof?

Martin Harris13/09/2014 22:43:50
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Not if my experience with Humbrol enamels is anything to go by!

Bob Cotsford13/09/2014 22:52:22
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No, you're wrong Phil. Petrol and diesel, yes, glow, no. Polyurethane is ok-ish but enamel isn't.

Phil Winks14/09/2014 00:01:02
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Thats confusing as the fuel proofer I've used in the internal areas on the DF is an enamel base, well it thins down fine with QD enamel thinners, and says something about being enamel on the label, its the JP high grade satin fuel proofer (one part) does this mean I have to redo all the fuel proofing on the DF?

Martin Harris14/09/2014 00:28:17
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I should hope that if it's sold as fuel proofer it ought to do the job! A bit of advice that I'm usually in too much of a hurry to adhere to is to let fuel proofer dry for at least a week before using the model but I've moved to using water based skinning varnish for many applications which appears fully fuel proof overnight - and easy to slosh around a tank bay and under a cowling, even if a finer finish is required outside.

Fatscoleymo14/09/2014 07:23:52
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A word of advice - I used PolyC on top of Solartex, mainly to seal the weave to keep it cleaner.

Although the blurb says it is fuel proof it's not proving to be. The raw 10% nitro fuel lifts it into a rubbery mess, and the exhaust residue does the same. It might be good with lower levels of nitro, but it's been a bit of a problem for me.

Peter Miller14/09/2014 08:16:20
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The JP fuel proofer is polyurethane and is a good fuel proofer. It looks and smells like Ronseal Polyurethane and I have used that in the past.

Phil Winks14/09/2014 09:12:08
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Posted by Peter Miller on 14/09/2014 08:16:20:

The JP fuel proofer is polyurethane and is a good fuel proofer. It looks and smells like Ronseal Polyurethane and I have used that in the past.

Phew thats a relief though I can see where my confusion came from, it says on the jar "thin if required with J perkins enamels thinners" obviously polyurethane can be thinned with enamel thinners, not something I was aware of but then my paints knowledge is pretty limited, Does anyone know if they make a gloss version, as I want to coat the varnished woodwork on the Df with something gloss, the satin is good for the solartex but the woodwork really needs to be gloss and it would be easier if I can airbrush it on. and the 2 pack stuff is a nightmare to clean out of an airbrush.

Edit:

actually change that question does any one know who stocks it as a quick search on the perkins web site reveals they do

Edited By Phil Winks on 14/09/2014 09:14:48

Peter Miller14/09/2014 09:17:17
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Yes, My tin is gloss.

Stevo16/09/2014 17:47:22
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Yep - used polyurethane spray varnish, 2K, Acid Cat. Lacquer all to good effect!

Edited By Stevo on 16/09/2014 17:47:32

Phil Winks16/09/2014 19:14:31
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Thanks fellas question answered and suitable gloss fuelproofer on its way

Colin Bernard17/09/2014 09:54:35
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Picking up on Fatscoleymo's post I have also found the same thing. Being mainly electric the only fuel proofer I had for a recently finished model was years old and congealed - but I did have a lot of PolyC so reading of its fuel proofing ability I ladled on a few coats.

It was around a month later that I got around to the maiden flight and found exactly the same. Trying to wipe the model clean was fruitless so now I have a white fuselage with off white streaks around the nose and any sort of cleaning shows the coating to be rubbery and sticky.

Need to try and find some way of getting back to the bare Solartex and then using a normal fuel proofer.

Steve Hargreaves - Moderator17/09/2014 10:25:33
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Strange as it seems I always "fuel proof" the front of my electric models......it stops water from a damp strip soaking into the wooden firewall etc....thumbs up

Bob Cotsford17/09/2014 11:54:40
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Posted by Fatscoleymo on 14/09/2014 07:23:52:

A word of advice - I used PolyC on top of Solartex, mainly to seal the weave to keep it cleaner.

Although the blurb says it is fuel proof it's not proving to be. The raw 10% nitro fuel lifts it into a rubbery mess, and the exhaust residue does the same. It might be good with lower levels of nitro, but it's been a bit of a problem for me.

It can't be worse than Flair Satin Fuel Proofer, I tried it on my Black Horse Macchi and it just lifts away after contact with 5% fuel even if it's cleaned up within minutes. Model looks like it's got mange now.

Martin Harris17/09/2014 12:38:05
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I've always used Falcon Skincrylic which I've assumed to be the same floor varnish as PolyC (I don't believe that many products marketed for our hobby are specifically manufactured for us) which has worked brilliantly for me - although I haven't used it over raw Solartex. Perhaps it doesn't bond to it like it does to paint or bare wood?

Fatscoleymo17/09/2014 20:35:43
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Martin - you could have just hit the nail on the head there. Area's that were painted (including the ply gear doors and ABS cowl) and then proofed are OK. So it could be that, as you say, PolyC may not bond so well to 'saw' Solartex.

I'll do a little experimenting over the next week and see if that's the case.

Steve

Fatscoleymo18/09/2014 16:39:14
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Well .... I was mistaken. I've just put a little fuel (10% nitro) onto painted and 'raw' Solartex and the PolyC has detached from both areas. I'll be thinking a different route in future.

Shame 'cos it's so easy and quick to apply.

Steve

Colin Bernard18/09/2014 17:12:05
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Hoping that wouldn't be the case Steve!

So need to look around for another fuel proofer now but the question is whether I apply that over the existing PolyC, or somehow (?) get the PolyC off and apply proofer directly on the Solartex.

Phil Winks18/09/2014 18:23:48
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Posted by Colin Bernard on 18/09/2014 17:12:05:

Hoping that wouldn't be the case Steve!

So need to look around for another fuel proofer now but the question is whether I apply that over the existing PolyC, or somehow (?) get the PolyC off and apply proofer directly on the Solartex.

sounds like fuel is one way to remove polyc lol

Fatscoleymo18/09/2014 19:13:37
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Colin - why not try a little fuel on an inconspicuous area and see how it is? I've cleaned off the 'rubbery' residue with some Detatcheur (it's used for stains / marks in clothes) we get here in France, and it comes up ok. You may be able to live with it. The fuel I use is Model Technics Formula Irvine 10% - maybe your fuel will not react as much?

Good luck!!!

Steve

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