Kits

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Frank Skilbeck  |  Sep 30, 2021  |  0 comments
Frank Skilbeck assembles the built-up balsa version of Max-Thrust's popular high wing sports model

The original foam Max-Thrust Riot has proved to be very successful, with several original and updated V2 versions in our club. Plus, I had the XL version for a couple of years until a club mate persuaded me to pass it on, where it is still doing sterling service. So, the new balsa/ply Pro-Built versions now being distributed by Century UK have a fine pedigree.

Neil Diment  |  Sep 16, 2021  |  0 comments
With a large Mustang on his shopping list, Neil Diment changes tack and is seduced by the 3D capable Bushmaster from Legacy Aviation. Flying pictures by Al Morrow.

Let me cast your mind back to happier, more settled times... It’s August 2019 and I’m at the Nats with my mate, Billy. Two Scotsmen on the annual pilgrimage and we’ve headed into the Nexus Models tent so that I can check their price on the new Hangar 9 P-51 and look at some power options. Hanging from the ceiling Billy spots what appears to be a fairly large Turbo Beaver. 'Awf'y nice model that. Crackin’ scheme too!', he muses.

Arnaldo Correia  |  Aug 03, 2021  |  0 comments
Arnaldo Correia electrifies Keil Kraft’s vintage towline glider.

The Invader was one of six Keil Kraft kits recently chosen for re-release by Ripmax. During my (mis-spent) youth I flew free-flight gliders with long, slender fuselages and was always fascinated by the vintage, full fuselage gliders of yore.

David Ashby  |  Jul 02, 2021  |  0 comments
Dynam are back and quality levels have improved too. David Ashby flies a biplane classic

I don’t know about you, but I do feel a little guilty when I see the great chunks of polystyrene used to protect foam models. It doesn’t bear thinking about how long that stuff will take to break down in landfill, making Dynam’s all-cardboard packaging a welcome sight.

Kevin Crozier  |  Jun 10, 2021  |  0 comments

Starved of his flying fix the Editor enjoys taking the latest Twister helicopter for a spin around his living room.

Thanks to you-know-what and the ensuing New Year lockdown, club flying earlier this year was a non-starter. Grrr!

However, with the arrival of the latest Twister Ninja 250 micro helicopter, distributed by J Perkins, I was still able to keep my thumbs on the sticks, albeit in the rather more restricted confines of my living room. It's a real sweetie, so let's take a closer look at what's in the box.

andrew james  |  Apr 22, 2021  |  0 comments
Andrew James snaps together a quick build, semi-scale glider from FMS.

At 2.5 metre wingspan this quick assembly kit follows in the footsteps of FMS' 3m and 2.3m Fox gliders. In full size terms the Fox is an out and out aerobatic machine while the ASW-17 is an Open Class thermal hunter. Both models look the part, but I am guessing that more compromises have had to be made with the ASW to make it a tough and durable R/C model.

David Ashby  |  Apr 15, 2021  |  0 comments

David Ashby enjoyed his big Bolero, right up to the moment he ran out of talent, but finds consolation in this new compact version

David Ashby  |  Mar 31, 2021  |  0 comments
Arrows Hobby has raised its game with the release of this twin electric ducted fan jet. David Ashby straps in. Despite its contemporary appearance the Mikoyan MiG-29 has been around for over 40 years, would you believe, and remains in production.

Richard Harris  |  Feb 05, 2021  |  0 comments
It has been refreshing to see traditional building making a small comeback, even more so over the last few months where a little bit more building time has been available. In turn this has encouraged small UK kit manufacturers to revitalise older classics with more modern construction techniques, and with fresh new designs springing up for budding builders to tackle.
Frank Skilbeck  |  Aug 24, 2020  |  0 comments
Aero-Naut are a German model company that have been manufacturing a wide range aircraft and boat kits since the 1930s, their kits exuding quality and thoroughness, the cartoon scale Luscombe Silvaire 8 being a fine example. I say cartoon scale as, for ease of building, the model uses a square section fuselage rather than the monocoque oval construction of the full size. The full size, incidentally, broke new ground when introduced in 1937 as it used an all metal fuselage with a fabric covered wing and no wood in its construction, with all metal sheeted wings being introduced in 1946. The aero-naut version, unlike the full size, is of all wood construction and designed for electric power with a 350-watt power train using a 3 or 4S LiPo of around 3,000 mAh.
Simon Cocker  |  Jun 05, 2020  |  0 comments
Graham Ashby (RCM&E former editor) has reviewed a number of scale models from the Freewing range in the past and when chatting to him he’s been genuinely passionate about his collection of foam warbirds. He convinced me that with care they can be kept pristine, being structurally sound enough to absorb a degree of knocking about and able to withstand some aerial abuse, with flight performances providing the real scale effect of the type. His positivity warmed me to the whole concept of an EPO-based RTF, which opened the door to ticking off an item on my bucket list. For many years I’ve harboured the desire to fly an L-39, be it jet-powered or a big PSS, and with Freewing’s EDF version purporting to offer sport-style performance in a scale package it seemed just the ticket, particularly as it will take off from short-grass runways, which is all I have at my disposal.
David Ashby  |  Nov 29, 2019  |  0 comments
There are ARTF kits and there are ARTF kits. Some require little work and fall together without too much effort or added expense, others are more of a ‘project’, requiring time and patience to complete, along with a few extra purchases. This falls into the latter camp and while that’s not to criticise Hangar 9’s new P-47, you should definitely do your sums before purchase. Has there ever been a time when E-flite or Hangar 9 didn’t have a P-47 in the range? In one form or another it’s the warbird that those brands always seem to produce, but you can’t blame them.
Andy Gower  |  Oct 10, 2019  |  0 comments
The Chipmunk, I’ve always assumed, is very much a British aircraft, indeed the image of a Chipmunk was as British to me as the thought of a Spitfire doing a victory roll over the Kentish countryside in the summer of 1940. So, I was surprised to find that, in fact, the Chipmunk was both designed and first flown by de Havilland in Canada. Apparently, at the end of World War II de Havilland in the UK was keen to develop a new low-wing trainer to replace its aging Tiger Moth but was too busy developing new jet aircraft so the task was handed to the Canadian operation. Accordingly, the Chipmunk first flew in Canada in May 1946 and was in service later that year.
RCME Staff  |  Aug 05, 2015  |  0 comments
My first acquaintance with this model was way back in 1982 as a keen 12-year-old during the first of many visits to Woodvale. Much like every weekend I’ve spent there since, it was a fantastic experience - the trade presence in the massive hangars seemed huge to the eyes of this pre-teen, with goodies seemingly stacked right to the roof. A varied range of superb models adorned the flightline: small to almost full-size, sports to exquisite scale, yet one particular example, within the latter category, really grabbed my attention. A large German tri-motor, the Junkers Ju 52.
David Ashby  |  Jun 21, 2015  |  0 comments
This list is designedto help readers locate reviews in their back issues or the digital archive. It is in manufacturer alphabetical order and goes back to include Jan 2007, allSpecial issuesand any reviews published here on the site. This index is updated every month as RCM&E is published. Used in conjunction with the digital archive, it should provide a fast way of finding what you're after.

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